BRANT UNITED WAY: What defines H.O.P.E.?

Opinion Nov 14, 2017 by Brant United Way Brant News

Have you ever needed to contact a service over the weekend and they weren’t open until Monday? Those 48 hours between Friday night and Monday morning can be the longest waiting time in your life.

What happens if you are nearing a crisis point?

Brant United Way funds H.O.P.E. (Helping Ourselves through Peer Support and Employment), a program started by the Canadian Mental Health Association. The program runs on the weekends when most support — except, of course, emergency services — are unavailable. It’s a drop-in program that provides the flexibility for people to come as they need.

Oftentimes, the individuals who attend H.O.P.E need a safe place to go, the opportunity to be with other people and to be where people will listen and understand. H.O.P.E is a place where stress doesn’t turn into crisis, and peers can provide some life lessons and coping strategies that help.

Take the cases of two women who are currently supported by H.O.P.E. 

Teena has been going to the program for almost three years. She has no family support and needs someone who can listen when she needs it. The weekends are long and lonely, but H.O.P.E. is there for her. While she was uneasy when she first attended, she’s comfortable with participants and staff now and sees herself becoming a peer helper with some further education. It’s a pay-it-forward situation that works. Those with lived experience with mental health issues receive support and some are able to use their life lessons and increased skills to help others.

Another participant who attends H.O.P.E. felt very isolated on the weekends. She says she would sit and “stew” about her problems. Since attending the program on Saturdays, she has met new friends, always has someone to talk to and problem solve with, and has been introduced to new, healthier food choices at the drop-in as well. The program offers not only emotional support but practical and fun activities that engage participants.

Brant United Way supports H.O.P.E. because we recognize that some individuals with mental health concerns need a place to be on those long, lonely weekends. It’s not only a compassionate and productive way to help people, it’s the first step to disclose a potential crisis situation. That’s good planning, great support and an efficient and effective use of Brant United Way funding.

H.O.P.E. is a great example of how local donations are changing lives here in our community.

BRANT UNITED WAY: What defines H.O.P.E.?

Opinion Nov 14, 2017 by Brant United Way Brant News

Have you ever needed to contact a service over the weekend and they weren’t open until Monday? Those 48 hours between Friday night and Monday morning can be the longest waiting time in your life.

What happens if you are nearing a crisis point?

Brant United Way funds H.O.P.E. (Helping Ourselves through Peer Support and Employment), a program started by the Canadian Mental Health Association. The program runs on the weekends when most support — except, of course, emergency services — are unavailable. It’s a drop-in program that provides the flexibility for people to come as they need.

Oftentimes, the individuals who attend H.O.P.E need a safe place to go, the opportunity to be with other people and to be where people will listen and understand. H.O.P.E is a place where stress doesn’t turn into crisis, and peers can provide some life lessons and coping strategies that help.

Take the cases of two women who are currently supported by H.O.P.E. 

Teena has been going to the program for almost three years. She has no family support and needs someone who can listen when she needs it. The weekends are long and lonely, but H.O.P.E. is there for her. While she was uneasy when she first attended, she’s comfortable with participants and staff now and sees herself becoming a peer helper with some further education. It’s a pay-it-forward situation that works. Those with lived experience with mental health issues receive support and some are able to use their life lessons and increased skills to help others.

Another participant who attends H.O.P.E. felt very isolated on the weekends. She says she would sit and “stew” about her problems. Since attending the program on Saturdays, she has met new friends, always has someone to talk to and problem solve with, and has been introduced to new, healthier food choices at the drop-in as well. The program offers not only emotional support but practical and fun activities that engage participants.

Brant United Way supports H.O.P.E. because we recognize that some individuals with mental health concerns need a place to be on those long, lonely weekends. It’s not only a compassionate and productive way to help people, it’s the first step to disclose a potential crisis situation. That’s good planning, great support and an efficient and effective use of Brant United Way funding.

H.O.P.E. is a great example of how local donations are changing lives here in our community.

BRANT UNITED WAY: What defines H.O.P.E.?

Opinion Nov 14, 2017 by Brant United Way Brant News

Have you ever needed to contact a service over the weekend and they weren’t open until Monday? Those 48 hours between Friday night and Monday morning can be the longest waiting time in your life.

What happens if you are nearing a crisis point?

Brant United Way funds H.O.P.E. (Helping Ourselves through Peer Support and Employment), a program started by the Canadian Mental Health Association. The program runs on the weekends when most support — except, of course, emergency services — are unavailable. It’s a drop-in program that provides the flexibility for people to come as they need.

Oftentimes, the individuals who attend H.O.P.E need a safe place to go, the opportunity to be with other people and to be where people will listen and understand. H.O.P.E is a place where stress doesn’t turn into crisis, and peers can provide some life lessons and coping strategies that help.

Take the cases of two women who are currently supported by H.O.P.E. 

Teena has been going to the program for almost three years. She has no family support and needs someone who can listen when she needs it. The weekends are long and lonely, but H.O.P.E. is there for her. While she was uneasy when she first attended, she’s comfortable with participants and staff now and sees herself becoming a peer helper with some further education. It’s a pay-it-forward situation that works. Those with lived experience with mental health issues receive support and some are able to use their life lessons and increased skills to help others.

Another participant who attends H.O.P.E. felt very isolated on the weekends. She says she would sit and “stew” about her problems. Since attending the program on Saturdays, she has met new friends, always has someone to talk to and problem solve with, and has been introduced to new, healthier food choices at the drop-in as well. The program offers not only emotional support but practical and fun activities that engage participants.

Brant United Way supports H.O.P.E. because we recognize that some individuals with mental health concerns need a place to be on those long, lonely weekends. It’s not only a compassionate and productive way to help people, it’s the first step to disclose a potential crisis situation. That’s good planning, great support and an efficient and effective use of Brant United Way funding.

H.O.P.E. is a great example of how local donations are changing lives here in our community.