Fundraising in ink

Opinion Sep 15, 2017 by Jesse Ferguson Brant News

Brantford’s Sean Thompson has a predicament and has been overwhelmed with the community’s response.

The 29-year-old Brantford resident is chasing his dreams. 

After a successful career in the automotive industry, Thompson wanted to follow his passion and go to school for fine arts at Fanshawe College in London to become an artist. 

He may have jumped the gun. After dumping his small life savings into paying tuition, he recently discovered that, due to past mistakes, he is not eligible to receive OSAP, which he needed to supplement his savings.

Thompson blames himself for not seeing this ahead of time, but has is trying to keep his dream alive.

The self-taught artist is excited to announce that Deep Water Tattoo in downtown Brantford has decided to throw a fundraiser to help get him to school. Deep Water Tattoo, at 136 Dalhousie St., will be doing small $50 tattoos all day and night on Saturday, Sept. 16, with all the proceeds going to Thompson's college fund.

The plan is to hang Thompson's art in the tattoo shop, so people know what they are supporting by getting ink done. 

Thompson also thought he could grab even more attention by sitting outside and working on a large canvas, so people will see him and maybe pop in.

If this plan does not pan out, Thompson relents that he will most likely be forced to drop out.

However, Thompson remains positive that his dream is not dead and that instead, his future is a blank canvas — he just wants to be able to paint it.

Fundraising in ink

Opinion Sep 15, 2017 by Jesse Ferguson Brant News

Brantford’s Sean Thompson has a predicament and has been overwhelmed with the community’s response.

The 29-year-old Brantford resident is chasing his dreams. 

After a successful career in the automotive industry, Thompson wanted to follow his passion and go to school for fine arts at Fanshawe College in London to become an artist. 

He may have jumped the gun. After dumping his small life savings into paying tuition, he recently discovered that, due to past mistakes, he is not eligible to receive OSAP, which he needed to supplement his savings.

Thompson blames himself for not seeing this ahead of time, but has is trying to keep his dream alive.

The self-taught artist is excited to announce that Deep Water Tattoo in downtown Brantford has decided to throw a fundraiser to help get him to school. Deep Water Tattoo, at 136 Dalhousie St., will be doing small $50 tattoos all day and night on Saturday, Sept. 16, with all the proceeds going to Thompson's college fund.

The plan is to hang Thompson's art in the tattoo shop, so people know what they are supporting by getting ink done. 

Thompson also thought he could grab even more attention by sitting outside and working on a large canvas, so people will see him and maybe pop in.

If this plan does not pan out, Thompson relents that he will most likely be forced to drop out.

However, Thompson remains positive that his dream is not dead and that instead, his future is a blank canvas — he just wants to be able to paint it.

Fundraising in ink

Opinion Sep 15, 2017 by Jesse Ferguson Brant News

Brantford’s Sean Thompson has a predicament and has been overwhelmed with the community’s response.

The 29-year-old Brantford resident is chasing his dreams. 

After a successful career in the automotive industry, Thompson wanted to follow his passion and go to school for fine arts at Fanshawe College in London to become an artist. 

He may have jumped the gun. After dumping his small life savings into paying tuition, he recently discovered that, due to past mistakes, he is not eligible to receive OSAP, which he needed to supplement his savings.

Thompson blames himself for not seeing this ahead of time, but has is trying to keep his dream alive.

The self-taught artist is excited to announce that Deep Water Tattoo in downtown Brantford has decided to throw a fundraiser to help get him to school. Deep Water Tattoo, at 136 Dalhousie St., will be doing small $50 tattoos all day and night on Saturday, Sept. 16, with all the proceeds going to Thompson's college fund.

The plan is to hang Thompson's art in the tattoo shop, so people know what they are supporting by getting ink done. 

Thompson also thought he could grab even more attention by sitting outside and working on a large canvas, so people will see him and maybe pop in.

If this plan does not pan out, Thompson relents that he will most likely be forced to drop out.

However, Thompson remains positive that his dream is not dead and that instead, his future is a blank canvas — he just wants to be able to paint it.