FOCUS ON SENIORS: A truly magical matinee

Opinion Apr 27, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The first Musical Matinee hosted by the Grand River Council on Aging on April 19 was a resounding success. How do we know? The theatre produced the show, the performers performed, people smiled, and the council even made a small profit.

Many critical influences affected the show’s outcome. Publicity, marketing and promotion were all important. Forming linkages with business members to attract sponsorships was another valiant effort.

The Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA) strives to promote the value of lived experience.

Using a rough calculation of tickets sold by average age of the theatre patron, it was estimated there were more than 21,000 years of lived experience in the theatre, including audience and performers. When you put it like that, the shared theatrical and musical experience becomes a collective aha moment.

How many memories would be stored over that many years?

Memories are created year after year, month after month, and day by day. Some recollections come to mind often, while others are buried and mostly forgotten.

In an almost magical process, our subconscious can help us access those memories, thoughts, and feelings that have been long dormant. Music is known to evoke powerful emotions. The melody of the song may call to one person, while another person thrills to the lyrics and their intended meaning.

With the glorious Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts as backdrop to the incredible talents of the George Rose Band and the Kennie Marco Band, and the unbelievable collective lived experience in the theatre, the Musical Matinee was a magical afternoon.

As promised, pianist Shirley Hutty welcomed guests on the grand piano in the lobby. The quality of her playing was exceptional. Some patrons were heard to complain that as they used the back entrance to the theatre, they missed out on the piano medley. Posting musical entertainment in both the box office and at the stage door is something to think about if the GRCOA does another show.

Host David Georgeff, retired from a 39-year career in radio at CKPC, was a polished, skilled performer in his own right. His voice was his instrument, used skilfully to introduce the various acts. Throughout the afternoon, his memories began to emerge also. With his wit and natural charm, Georgeff shared some of his recollections with the audience.

And then there were the bands and the singers. Both bands put on quite a show. From the George Rose Band came the Big Band sound of the 1940s and ‘50s, and even included a bit of rock ‘n’ roll. Dancers Brian and Kelly Sloat took to the stage with the George Rose Band on several occasions. An Elvis Presley impersonator appeared complete with a tissue scarf that he actually tore into tiny strips to give to his adoring fans.

Performers Nancy DiFelice and Sonny Sinclair perfectly complemented the Kennie Marco Band, bringing a bit of jazz and a bit of country to the stage. And, of course, Marco played a combination of blues, jazz and rock from the 1960s and ‘70s.

For George Rose and Kennie Marco, it was great to entertain for Brantford. Both had several family members and friends in the theatre that day. The common refrain was “It’s like old home week around here” as people chatted.

Judging from the smiles and laughter and the buzz of conversation before and after the show, it seems the music played that day put everyone in a good mood. The songs called to mind weddings, births, successes, celebrations and other good stuff.

What a wonderful life! On behalf of the Grand River Council on Aging, thanks for the memories.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: A truly magical matinee

Opinion Apr 27, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The first Musical Matinee hosted by the Grand River Council on Aging on April 19 was a resounding success. How do we know? The theatre produced the show, the performers performed, people smiled, and the council even made a small profit.

Many critical influences affected the show’s outcome. Publicity, marketing and promotion were all important. Forming linkages with business members to attract sponsorships was another valiant effort.

The Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA) strives to promote the value of lived experience.

Using a rough calculation of tickets sold by average age of the theatre patron, it was estimated there were more than 21,000 years of lived experience in the theatre, including audience and performers. When you put it like that, the shared theatrical and musical experience becomes a collective aha moment.

How many memories would be stored over that many years?

Memories are created year after year, month after month, and day by day. Some recollections come to mind often, while others are buried and mostly forgotten.

In an almost magical process, our subconscious can help us access those memories, thoughts, and feelings that have been long dormant. Music is known to evoke powerful emotions. The melody of the song may call to one person, while another person thrills to the lyrics and their intended meaning.

With the glorious Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts as backdrop to the incredible talents of the George Rose Band and the Kennie Marco Band, and the unbelievable collective lived experience in the theatre, the Musical Matinee was a magical afternoon.

As promised, pianist Shirley Hutty welcomed guests on the grand piano in the lobby. The quality of her playing was exceptional. Some patrons were heard to complain that as they used the back entrance to the theatre, they missed out on the piano medley. Posting musical entertainment in both the box office and at the stage door is something to think about if the GRCOA does another show.

Host David Georgeff, retired from a 39-year career in radio at CKPC, was a polished, skilled performer in his own right. His voice was his instrument, used skilfully to introduce the various acts. Throughout the afternoon, his memories began to emerge also. With his wit and natural charm, Georgeff shared some of his recollections with the audience.

And then there were the bands and the singers. Both bands put on quite a show. From the George Rose Band came the Big Band sound of the 1940s and ‘50s, and even included a bit of rock ‘n’ roll. Dancers Brian and Kelly Sloat took to the stage with the George Rose Band on several occasions. An Elvis Presley impersonator appeared complete with a tissue scarf that he actually tore into tiny strips to give to his adoring fans.

Performers Nancy DiFelice and Sonny Sinclair perfectly complemented the Kennie Marco Band, bringing a bit of jazz and a bit of country to the stage. And, of course, Marco played a combination of blues, jazz and rock from the 1960s and ‘70s.

For George Rose and Kennie Marco, it was great to entertain for Brantford. Both had several family members and friends in the theatre that day. The common refrain was “It’s like old home week around here” as people chatted.

Judging from the smiles and laughter and the buzz of conversation before and after the show, it seems the music played that day put everyone in a good mood. The songs called to mind weddings, births, successes, celebrations and other good stuff.

What a wonderful life! On behalf of the Grand River Council on Aging, thanks for the memories.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: A truly magical matinee

Opinion Apr 27, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The first Musical Matinee hosted by the Grand River Council on Aging on April 19 was a resounding success. How do we know? The theatre produced the show, the performers performed, people smiled, and the council even made a small profit.

Many critical influences affected the show’s outcome. Publicity, marketing and promotion were all important. Forming linkages with business members to attract sponsorships was another valiant effort.

The Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA) strives to promote the value of lived experience.

Using a rough calculation of tickets sold by average age of the theatre patron, it was estimated there were more than 21,000 years of lived experience in the theatre, including audience and performers. When you put it like that, the shared theatrical and musical experience becomes a collective aha moment.

How many memories would be stored over that many years?

Memories are created year after year, month after month, and day by day. Some recollections come to mind often, while others are buried and mostly forgotten.

In an almost magical process, our subconscious can help us access those memories, thoughts, and feelings that have been long dormant. Music is known to evoke powerful emotions. The melody of the song may call to one person, while another person thrills to the lyrics and their intended meaning.

With the glorious Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts as backdrop to the incredible talents of the George Rose Band and the Kennie Marco Band, and the unbelievable collective lived experience in the theatre, the Musical Matinee was a magical afternoon.

As promised, pianist Shirley Hutty welcomed guests on the grand piano in the lobby. The quality of her playing was exceptional. Some patrons were heard to complain that as they used the back entrance to the theatre, they missed out on the piano medley. Posting musical entertainment in both the box office and at the stage door is something to think about if the GRCOA does another show.

Host David Georgeff, retired from a 39-year career in radio at CKPC, was a polished, skilled performer in his own right. His voice was his instrument, used skilfully to introduce the various acts. Throughout the afternoon, his memories began to emerge also. With his wit and natural charm, Georgeff shared some of his recollections with the audience.

And then there were the bands and the singers. Both bands put on quite a show. From the George Rose Band came the Big Band sound of the 1940s and ‘50s, and even included a bit of rock ‘n’ roll. Dancers Brian and Kelly Sloat took to the stage with the George Rose Band on several occasions. An Elvis Presley impersonator appeared complete with a tissue scarf that he actually tore into tiny strips to give to his adoring fans.

Performers Nancy DiFelice and Sonny Sinclair perfectly complemented the Kennie Marco Band, bringing a bit of jazz and a bit of country to the stage. And, of course, Marco played a combination of blues, jazz and rock from the 1960s and ‘70s.

For George Rose and Kennie Marco, it was great to entertain for Brantford. Both had several family members and friends in the theatre that day. The common refrain was “It’s like old home week around here” as people chatted.

Judging from the smiles and laughter and the buzz of conversation before and after the show, it seems the music played that day put everyone in a good mood. The songs called to mind weddings, births, successes, celebrations and other good stuff.

What a wonderful life! On behalf of the Grand River Council on Aging, thanks for the memories.