FOCUS ON SENIORS: What will they think of next?

Opinion Apr 13, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

What will they think of next? With the over-55 age group growing at an unprecedented rate, a huge market has developed for anything geared toward seniors. Coupled with that is a growing recognition of the need for accessibility planning. More and more products and services are being developed by innovators looking to the changing demographic forecast for the future.

Examples abound. Take, for instance, the products that look like attractive jewellery but are actually wearable sensors that can help staff in retirement communities monitor the wearer’s daily activities. The device can actually track eating, sleeping and physical activity habits to ensure the most accurate health tracking available.

GPS-enabled shoes are another useful wearable product. They can be used to help people keep track of elderly family members. This product is particularly helpful with seniors who have a tendency to wander and get lost.

In 2016, Heathrow Airport marked World Alzheimer Day by announcing its mission to become the world’s first dementia-friendly airport. This exciting new initiative demonstrates enormous efforts to meet the needs of an aging population. In order to accomplish this lofty goal, all 76,000 Heathrow staff members were trained to help those affected by dementia. With a vision to give passengers the best airport service in the world, Heathrow recognizes that airports can be particularly stressful for passengers with dementia.

For fun and function, Hasbro toy manufacturer has a special product line geared for seniors called “Joy for All” that includes a cat and dog option. Each cute critter performs a variety of tricks to promote companionship. Stroke the dog’s cheek and the muzzle will cause the dog to nuzzle against your hand, petting its back activates its heartbeat, and when the robot dog is left alone it will automatically fall asleep. Kitty and doggy can help combat loneliness and isolation too.

The list goes on and on. Change is happening all around the world.

A Belgian firm by the name of Skilpop is producing modular prefab homes that are perfect for people for whom traditional houses are too big. These 516-square-foot homes are ideal for young singles and seniors. They are considered inexpensive, expandable and comfortable, and are set to be provided through social housing organizations in Belgium.

There are even accessible art galleries. Tangled Art Gallery in Toronto is more than just an accessible space where people with disabilities can experience contemporary art. It also provides a platform for artists with disabilities to display their work. Many media are on display including visual art, performance art and film. This venue is fully accessible, with wheelchair seating for about 30 people. All film screenings include closed captioning and all live performances include American Sign Language interpretation with the option for live audio description.

The Common Roots Urban Farm Garden in Halifax is an accessible space for those who are differently-abled. This garden is wheelchair-accessible and features garden beds that are elevated to be the optimal height for those who use mobility aids. People in wheelchairs or those going through rehabilitation can go to enjoy some therapeutic gardening. Situated close to a rehabilitation centre and an emergency room, the location is a great spot for patients to patronize. Future plans call for a tactile garden for those with visual impairments.

Senior Planet is a co-working space in New York City with an exploration centre for people over 60. Classes, workshops, lectures and events help this demographic thrive in the digital world. They can remain relevant and current in the workplace or learn to use technology to better manage their health. This educational hub provides information on how to share Internet links with friends and offers content in a range of categories, such as lifestyle, fashion and health.

It is no longer a case of “what will they think of next?”, but rather “when will they make it happen?” 

When Star Trek came on television in the 1960s, we were introduced to the tri-corder, a communication and analysis device used among the crew. Today, we have our own tri-corders as personal phones, the use of which continues to escalate while companies develop wristwatches to monitor heart rates. It’s good to know the dreamers and designers in areas of science and technology are taking those over 55 and people with varying abilities into account.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: What will they think of next?

Developments in science and technology are taking aging population into account

Opinion Apr 13, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

What will they think of next? With the over-55 age group growing at an unprecedented rate, a huge market has developed for anything geared toward seniors. Coupled with that is a growing recognition of the need for accessibility planning. More and more products and services are being developed by innovators looking to the changing demographic forecast for the future.

Examples abound. Take, for instance, the products that look like attractive jewellery but are actually wearable sensors that can help staff in retirement communities monitor the wearer’s daily activities. The device can actually track eating, sleeping and physical activity habits to ensure the most accurate health tracking available.

GPS-enabled shoes are another useful wearable product. They can be used to help people keep track of elderly family members. This product is particularly helpful with seniors who have a tendency to wander and get lost.

In 2016, Heathrow Airport marked World Alzheimer Day by announcing its mission to become the world’s first dementia-friendly airport. This exciting new initiative demonstrates enormous efforts to meet the needs of an aging population. In order to accomplish this lofty goal, all 76,000 Heathrow staff members were trained to help those affected by dementia. With a vision to give passengers the best airport service in the world, Heathrow recognizes that airports can be particularly stressful for passengers with dementia.

For fun and function, Hasbro toy manufacturer has a special product line geared for seniors called “Joy for All” that includes a cat and dog option. Each cute critter performs a variety of tricks to promote companionship. Stroke the dog’s cheek and the muzzle will cause the dog to nuzzle against your hand, petting its back activates its heartbeat, and when the robot dog is left alone it will automatically fall asleep. Kitty and doggy can help combat loneliness and isolation too.

The list goes on and on. Change is happening all around the world.

A Belgian firm by the name of Skilpop is producing modular prefab homes that are perfect for people for whom traditional houses are too big. These 516-square-foot homes are ideal for young singles and seniors. They are considered inexpensive, expandable and comfortable, and are set to be provided through social housing organizations in Belgium.

There are even accessible art galleries. Tangled Art Gallery in Toronto is more than just an accessible space where people with disabilities can experience contemporary art. It also provides a platform for artists with disabilities to display their work. Many media are on display including visual art, performance art and film. This venue is fully accessible, with wheelchair seating for about 30 people. All film screenings include closed captioning and all live performances include American Sign Language interpretation with the option for live audio description.

The Common Roots Urban Farm Garden in Halifax is an accessible space for those who are differently-abled. This garden is wheelchair-accessible and features garden beds that are elevated to be the optimal height for those who use mobility aids. People in wheelchairs or those going through rehabilitation can go to enjoy some therapeutic gardening. Situated close to a rehabilitation centre and an emergency room, the location is a great spot for patients to patronize. Future plans call for a tactile garden for those with visual impairments.

Senior Planet is a co-working space in New York City with an exploration centre for people over 60. Classes, workshops, lectures and events help this demographic thrive in the digital world. They can remain relevant and current in the workplace or learn to use technology to better manage their health. This educational hub provides information on how to share Internet links with friends and offers content in a range of categories, such as lifestyle, fashion and health.

It is no longer a case of “what will they think of next?”, but rather “when will they make it happen?” 

When Star Trek came on television in the 1960s, we were introduced to the tri-corder, a communication and analysis device used among the crew. Today, we have our own tri-corders as personal phones, the use of which continues to escalate while companies develop wristwatches to monitor heart rates. It’s good to know the dreamers and designers in areas of science and technology are taking those over 55 and people with varying abilities into account.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: What will they think of next?

Developments in science and technology are taking aging population into account

Opinion Apr 13, 2017 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

What will they think of next? With the over-55 age group growing at an unprecedented rate, a huge market has developed for anything geared toward seniors. Coupled with that is a growing recognition of the need for accessibility planning. More and more products and services are being developed by innovators looking to the changing demographic forecast for the future.

Examples abound. Take, for instance, the products that look like attractive jewellery but are actually wearable sensors that can help staff in retirement communities monitor the wearer’s daily activities. The device can actually track eating, sleeping and physical activity habits to ensure the most accurate health tracking available.

GPS-enabled shoes are another useful wearable product. They can be used to help people keep track of elderly family members. This product is particularly helpful with seniors who have a tendency to wander and get lost.

In 2016, Heathrow Airport marked World Alzheimer Day by announcing its mission to become the world’s first dementia-friendly airport. This exciting new initiative demonstrates enormous efforts to meet the needs of an aging population. In order to accomplish this lofty goal, all 76,000 Heathrow staff members were trained to help those affected by dementia. With a vision to give passengers the best airport service in the world, Heathrow recognizes that airports can be particularly stressful for passengers with dementia.

For fun and function, Hasbro toy manufacturer has a special product line geared for seniors called “Joy for All” that includes a cat and dog option. Each cute critter performs a variety of tricks to promote companionship. Stroke the dog’s cheek and the muzzle will cause the dog to nuzzle against your hand, petting its back activates its heartbeat, and when the robot dog is left alone it will automatically fall asleep. Kitty and doggy can help combat loneliness and isolation too.

The list goes on and on. Change is happening all around the world.

A Belgian firm by the name of Skilpop is producing modular prefab homes that are perfect for people for whom traditional houses are too big. These 516-square-foot homes are ideal for young singles and seniors. They are considered inexpensive, expandable and comfortable, and are set to be provided through social housing organizations in Belgium.

There are even accessible art galleries. Tangled Art Gallery in Toronto is more than just an accessible space where people with disabilities can experience contemporary art. It also provides a platform for artists with disabilities to display their work. Many media are on display including visual art, performance art and film. This venue is fully accessible, with wheelchair seating for about 30 people. All film screenings include closed captioning and all live performances include American Sign Language interpretation with the option for live audio description.

The Common Roots Urban Farm Garden in Halifax is an accessible space for those who are differently-abled. This garden is wheelchair-accessible and features garden beds that are elevated to be the optimal height for those who use mobility aids. People in wheelchairs or those going through rehabilitation can go to enjoy some therapeutic gardening. Situated close to a rehabilitation centre and an emergency room, the location is a great spot for patients to patronize. Future plans call for a tactile garden for those with visual impairments.

Senior Planet is a co-working space in New York City with an exploration centre for people over 60. Classes, workshops, lectures and events help this demographic thrive in the digital world. They can remain relevant and current in the workplace or learn to use technology to better manage their health. This educational hub provides information on how to share Internet links with friends and offers content in a range of categories, such as lifestyle, fashion and health.

It is no longer a case of “what will they think of next?”, but rather “when will they make it happen?” 

When Star Trek came on television in the 1960s, we were introduced to the tri-corder, a communication and analysis device used among the crew. Today, we have our own tri-corders as personal phones, the use of which continues to escalate while companies develop wristwatches to monitor heart rates. It’s good to know the dreamers and designers in areas of science and technology are taking those over 55 and people with varying abilities into account.