GRCHC: Take the fight out of food

Opinion Mar 08, 2017 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Are you a parent of a picky eater?

You aren’t alone.

According to Canadian dietitians, 35 per cent of toddlers and preschoolers are described by their parents as being picky eaters.

“Many factors can influence children and their eating habits,” said Katie Haneke, a registered dietitian at the Grand River Community Health Centre. “To begin with, parents are often rushed at mealtimes. When you consider the changing tastes of each child, things can become mayhem.”

During March — Nutrition Month — the Grand River Community Health Centre is joining forces with Dietitians of Canada to help Brantford-area residents improve their relationship with food, no matter what the struggle.

To promote the theme that eating should be joyful, not a source of everyday frustration and confusion, dietitians are educating parents to follow a three-step approach: spot the problem, get the facts and seek support.

“If your child is a picky eater, most likely part of the problem is that you have become frustrated preparing meals that everyone in the family will enjoy,” Haneke said.

“Involve your children and make a few small changes. Instead of telling your kids that they have to eat everything on their plate, let them choose what they will eat or maybe how much,” Haneke said. “It isn’t unusual for children to have an erratic appetite. That’s normal. Some days they may not be as hungry.”

During March break, Haneke will be hosting a kids' cooking class at the Grand River Community Health Centre, 363 Colborne Street, Brantford. Parents can register their children for the session held Thursday, March 15 between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. by contacting Haneke at 519-754-0777, ext. 234.

Another ‘food fight’ to be addressed during March is food fads.  

Haneke says: “Consumers are inundated with diets these days. Where do you begin?”

“We need to separate the fact from the fiction. The amount of information- true and untrue- is mind-boggling.”

Haneke points to the Internet as an example of too much information.

“Be sure to get your information from credible sources. Websites offering a quick fix or a miracle cure should be avoided. Remember the adage: if it is too good to be true, it’s likely false.”   

On March 9, and each Thursday through March, Haneke will be conducting a cooking demonstration that will teach the basics of a healthy diet. Everyone is invited to register by calling 519-754-0777, extension 234.  

John Urban, a senior living in Brantford, began going to the Grand River Community Health Centre 10 years ago. He describes himself as a ‘guy who doesn’t enjoy cooking.’

“I really never knew my way through the kitchen,” Urban said. “I have taken a number of cooking classes at the Grand River Community Health Centre and now I’m not too bad.”

Urban says: “Hey you have to eat.“

“Besides learning new skills, I have met others just like me.”

For further information about the activities provided during Nutrition Month at the Grand River Community Health Centre, visit www.grandriverchc.ca.

GRCHC: Take the fight out of food

Opinion Mar 08, 2017 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Are you a parent of a picky eater?

You aren’t alone.

According to Canadian dietitians, 35 per cent of toddlers and preschoolers are described by their parents as being picky eaters.

“Many factors can influence children and their eating habits,” said Katie Haneke, a registered dietitian at the Grand River Community Health Centre. “To begin with, parents are often rushed at mealtimes. When you consider the changing tastes of each child, things can become mayhem.”

During March — Nutrition Month — the Grand River Community Health Centre is joining forces with Dietitians of Canada to help Brantford-area residents improve their relationship with food, no matter what the struggle.

To promote the theme that eating should be joyful, not a source of everyday frustration and confusion, dietitians are educating parents to follow a three-step approach: spot the problem, get the facts and seek support.

“If your child is a picky eater, most likely part of the problem is that you have become frustrated preparing meals that everyone in the family will enjoy,” Haneke said.

“Involve your children and make a few small changes. Instead of telling your kids that they have to eat everything on their plate, let them choose what they will eat or maybe how much,” Haneke said. “It isn’t unusual for children to have an erratic appetite. That’s normal. Some days they may not be as hungry.”

During March break, Haneke will be hosting a kids' cooking class at the Grand River Community Health Centre, 363 Colborne Street, Brantford. Parents can register their children for the session held Thursday, March 15 between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. by contacting Haneke at 519-754-0777, ext. 234.

Another ‘food fight’ to be addressed during March is food fads.  

Haneke says: “Consumers are inundated with diets these days. Where do you begin?”

“We need to separate the fact from the fiction. The amount of information- true and untrue- is mind-boggling.”

Haneke points to the Internet as an example of too much information.

“Be sure to get your information from credible sources. Websites offering a quick fix or a miracle cure should be avoided. Remember the adage: if it is too good to be true, it’s likely false.”   

On March 9, and each Thursday through March, Haneke will be conducting a cooking demonstration that will teach the basics of a healthy diet. Everyone is invited to register by calling 519-754-0777, extension 234.  

John Urban, a senior living in Brantford, began going to the Grand River Community Health Centre 10 years ago. He describes himself as a ‘guy who doesn’t enjoy cooking.’

“I really never knew my way through the kitchen,” Urban said. “I have taken a number of cooking classes at the Grand River Community Health Centre and now I’m not too bad.”

Urban says: “Hey you have to eat.“

“Besides learning new skills, I have met others just like me.”

For further information about the activities provided during Nutrition Month at the Grand River Community Health Centre, visit www.grandriverchc.ca.

GRCHC: Take the fight out of food

Opinion Mar 08, 2017 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Are you a parent of a picky eater?

You aren’t alone.

According to Canadian dietitians, 35 per cent of toddlers and preschoolers are described by their parents as being picky eaters.

“Many factors can influence children and their eating habits,” said Katie Haneke, a registered dietitian at the Grand River Community Health Centre. “To begin with, parents are often rushed at mealtimes. When you consider the changing tastes of each child, things can become mayhem.”

During March — Nutrition Month — the Grand River Community Health Centre is joining forces with Dietitians of Canada to help Brantford-area residents improve their relationship with food, no matter what the struggle.

To promote the theme that eating should be joyful, not a source of everyday frustration and confusion, dietitians are educating parents to follow a three-step approach: spot the problem, get the facts and seek support.

“If your child is a picky eater, most likely part of the problem is that you have become frustrated preparing meals that everyone in the family will enjoy,” Haneke said.

“Involve your children and make a few small changes. Instead of telling your kids that they have to eat everything on their plate, let them choose what they will eat or maybe how much,” Haneke said. “It isn’t unusual for children to have an erratic appetite. That’s normal. Some days they may not be as hungry.”

During March break, Haneke will be hosting a kids' cooking class at the Grand River Community Health Centre, 363 Colborne Street, Brantford. Parents can register their children for the session held Thursday, March 15 between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. by contacting Haneke at 519-754-0777, ext. 234.

Another ‘food fight’ to be addressed during March is food fads.  

Haneke says: “Consumers are inundated with diets these days. Where do you begin?”

“We need to separate the fact from the fiction. The amount of information- true and untrue- is mind-boggling.”

Haneke points to the Internet as an example of too much information.

“Be sure to get your information from credible sources. Websites offering a quick fix or a miracle cure should be avoided. Remember the adage: if it is too good to be true, it’s likely false.”   

On March 9, and each Thursday through March, Haneke will be conducting a cooking demonstration that will teach the basics of a healthy diet. Everyone is invited to register by calling 519-754-0777, extension 234.  

John Urban, a senior living in Brantford, began going to the Grand River Community Health Centre 10 years ago. He describes himself as a ‘guy who doesn’t enjoy cooking.’

“I really never knew my way through the kitchen,” Urban said. “I have taken a number of cooking classes at the Grand River Community Health Centre and now I’m not too bad.”

Urban says: “Hey you have to eat.“

“Besides learning new skills, I have met others just like me.”

For further information about the activities provided during Nutrition Month at the Grand River Community Health Centre, visit www.grandriverchc.ca.