FOCUS ON SENIORS: More than just books

Opinion Nov 03, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

After more than 32 years on the job, Gay Kozak-Selby still gets excited about going to work each day.

Her job? She is the chief librarian for the County of Brant library system.

As the CEO, she is responsible for the libraries in Paris, Burford, Scotland, St. George and Glen Morris.  More than 20 librarians and support staff work together to assist patrons to access information.

In order to remain relevant in today’s technologically focused world, libraries have had to add many different items to their stock. The variety and sheer numbers of items are mind boggling.

There are 109,716 books, 12,064 DVDs or CDs and 60 LeapPads fill their shelves, while 48,880 items are available for downloading or streaming.

“There is no longer such a thing as a traditional library,” Kozak-Selby said. “For one thing, they aren’t quiet anymore.”

Oddly enough, libraries need to return to their roots to develop quiet zones or spaces where people can go to think and study.

In the short term, she envisions greater outreach into the community as libraries raise awareness about their free community information system. She and her staff are working to develop partnerships and she is open to new ideas.

One concept she’d like to develop is “pop-up libraries,” a portable lending service that can be set up temporarily in parks, arenas, grocery stores and pharmacies. Taking the information to where the people are is a new twist for libraries.

Kozak-Selby gets excited working with people to help them get what they want. One thing people often need help with is interpreting government documents. She finds great satisfaction in assisting people this way. She feels libraries should build collections based on their community, citing the differences between the five branches as examples. Often there is a unique interest in each.

Her long-term goals will focus on things such as building accessibility and parking. Some branches function better in these areas than others, but Kozak-Selby would like to see all five libraries become more age-friendly. 

Kozak-Selby said she loves change. A definite asset for the chief librarian, as under her leadership the libraries must constantly shift and change to adapt to rapidly changing technology.

Remember the old card catalogue system? She doesn’t miss that. The new method of electronic bar codes applied to each piece of information completes a filing function within seconds that would have taken hours to record and register using the old system.

And remember encyclopedias? At one time, every library had to have several versions and collections. Now small, digital storage devices and online searches have replaced those heavy, bulky tomes and access to reference materials couldn’t be simpler.

Librarians are available to assist people with technology, too. People especially appreciate the assistance with computer skills, using iPads and learning how to use e-readers.

The County of Brant libraries have information sessions, too. Crock pot cooking or knitting groups have been offered. At the rural branches, the libraries provide an important service by bringing people together and building community.

To date, partnerships with the Alzheimer Society and the Brant County Public Health Unit have been quite successful. Also, the partnership with the Grand River Council on Aging helped present a consumer protection workshops of information about scams.

These workshops served as a platform for the GRCOA to recruit people interested in becoming an age-friendly community champion. The “community” could be a block, a street, a neighbourhood, or an entire community.  

The library website is a wonderful place to find out what’s going on at the library. The event calendar lists daily activities ranging from writing classes to lectures, to family story times.

The “Take Home Tech” offers an incredible array of electronic items and mixed materials to clients in good standing, including empathy toys, Fitbits, launch pads or paper punches. If you don’t know what these items are, you can visit your library to find out.

Kozak-Selby and her team will be pleased to welcome you to any of the five branches that make up the County of Brant library system.

For more information call Burford at 519-449-5371, Glen Morris at 519-740-2122, Paris at 519-442-2433, Scotland at 519-446-0181 or St. George at 519-448-1300. Or visit their website at www.brant.ca/en/explore-our-services/library.

The library has something for all ages … books and so much more.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: More than just books

County of Brant Public Library system changing with the times

Opinion Nov 03, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

After more than 32 years on the job, Gay Kozak-Selby still gets excited about going to work each day.

Her job? She is the chief librarian for the County of Brant library system.

As the CEO, she is responsible for the libraries in Paris, Burford, Scotland, St. George and Glen Morris.  More than 20 librarians and support staff work together to assist patrons to access information.

In order to remain relevant in today’s technologically focused world, libraries have had to add many different items to their stock. The variety and sheer numbers of items are mind boggling.

There are 109,716 books, 12,064 DVDs or CDs and 60 LeapPads fill their shelves, while 48,880 items are available for downloading or streaming.

“There is no longer such a thing as a traditional library,” Kozak-Selby said. “For one thing, they aren’t quiet anymore.”

Oddly enough, libraries need to return to their roots to develop quiet zones or spaces where people can go to think and study.

In the short term, she envisions greater outreach into the community as libraries raise awareness about their free community information system. She and her staff are working to develop partnerships and she is open to new ideas.

One concept she’d like to develop is “pop-up libraries,” a portable lending service that can be set up temporarily in parks, arenas, grocery stores and pharmacies. Taking the information to where the people are is a new twist for libraries.

Kozak-Selby gets excited working with people to help them get what they want. One thing people often need help with is interpreting government documents. She finds great satisfaction in assisting people this way. She feels libraries should build collections based on their community, citing the differences between the five branches as examples. Often there is a unique interest in each.

Her long-term goals will focus on things such as building accessibility and parking. Some branches function better in these areas than others, but Kozak-Selby would like to see all five libraries become more age-friendly. 

Kozak-Selby said she loves change. A definite asset for the chief librarian, as under her leadership the libraries must constantly shift and change to adapt to rapidly changing technology.

Remember the old card catalogue system? She doesn’t miss that. The new method of electronic bar codes applied to each piece of information completes a filing function within seconds that would have taken hours to record and register using the old system.

And remember encyclopedias? At one time, every library had to have several versions and collections. Now small, digital storage devices and online searches have replaced those heavy, bulky tomes and access to reference materials couldn’t be simpler.

Librarians are available to assist people with technology, too. People especially appreciate the assistance with computer skills, using iPads and learning how to use e-readers.

The County of Brant libraries have information sessions, too. Crock pot cooking or knitting groups have been offered. At the rural branches, the libraries provide an important service by bringing people together and building community.

To date, partnerships with the Alzheimer Society and the Brant County Public Health Unit have been quite successful. Also, the partnership with the Grand River Council on Aging helped present a consumer protection workshops of information about scams.

These workshops served as a platform for the GRCOA to recruit people interested in becoming an age-friendly community champion. The “community” could be a block, a street, a neighbourhood, or an entire community.  

The library website is a wonderful place to find out what’s going on at the library. The event calendar lists daily activities ranging from writing classes to lectures, to family story times.

The “Take Home Tech” offers an incredible array of electronic items and mixed materials to clients in good standing, including empathy toys, Fitbits, launch pads or paper punches. If you don’t know what these items are, you can visit your library to find out.

Kozak-Selby and her team will be pleased to welcome you to any of the five branches that make up the County of Brant library system.

For more information call Burford at 519-449-5371, Glen Morris at 519-740-2122, Paris at 519-442-2433, Scotland at 519-446-0181 or St. George at 519-448-1300. Or visit their website at www.brant.ca/en/explore-our-services/library.

The library has something for all ages … books and so much more.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: More than just books

County of Brant Public Library system changing with the times

Opinion Nov 03, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

After more than 32 years on the job, Gay Kozak-Selby still gets excited about going to work each day.

Her job? She is the chief librarian for the County of Brant library system.

As the CEO, she is responsible for the libraries in Paris, Burford, Scotland, St. George and Glen Morris.  More than 20 librarians and support staff work together to assist patrons to access information.

In order to remain relevant in today’s technologically focused world, libraries have had to add many different items to their stock. The variety and sheer numbers of items are mind boggling.

There are 109,716 books, 12,064 DVDs or CDs and 60 LeapPads fill their shelves, while 48,880 items are available for downloading or streaming.

“There is no longer such a thing as a traditional library,” Kozak-Selby said. “For one thing, they aren’t quiet anymore.”

Oddly enough, libraries need to return to their roots to develop quiet zones or spaces where people can go to think and study.

In the short term, she envisions greater outreach into the community as libraries raise awareness about their free community information system. She and her staff are working to develop partnerships and she is open to new ideas.

One concept she’d like to develop is “pop-up libraries,” a portable lending service that can be set up temporarily in parks, arenas, grocery stores and pharmacies. Taking the information to where the people are is a new twist for libraries.

Kozak-Selby gets excited working with people to help them get what they want. One thing people often need help with is interpreting government documents. She finds great satisfaction in assisting people this way. She feels libraries should build collections based on their community, citing the differences between the five branches as examples. Often there is a unique interest in each.

Her long-term goals will focus on things such as building accessibility and parking. Some branches function better in these areas than others, but Kozak-Selby would like to see all five libraries become more age-friendly. 

Kozak-Selby said she loves change. A definite asset for the chief librarian, as under her leadership the libraries must constantly shift and change to adapt to rapidly changing technology.

Remember the old card catalogue system? She doesn’t miss that. The new method of electronic bar codes applied to each piece of information completes a filing function within seconds that would have taken hours to record and register using the old system.

And remember encyclopedias? At one time, every library had to have several versions and collections. Now small, digital storage devices and online searches have replaced those heavy, bulky tomes and access to reference materials couldn’t be simpler.

Librarians are available to assist people with technology, too. People especially appreciate the assistance with computer skills, using iPads and learning how to use e-readers.

The County of Brant libraries have information sessions, too. Crock pot cooking or knitting groups have been offered. At the rural branches, the libraries provide an important service by bringing people together and building community.

To date, partnerships with the Alzheimer Society and the Brant County Public Health Unit have been quite successful. Also, the partnership with the Grand River Council on Aging helped present a consumer protection workshops of information about scams.

These workshops served as a platform for the GRCOA to recruit people interested in becoming an age-friendly community champion. The “community” could be a block, a street, a neighbourhood, or an entire community.  

The library website is a wonderful place to find out what’s going on at the library. The event calendar lists daily activities ranging from writing classes to lectures, to family story times.

The “Take Home Tech” offers an incredible array of electronic items and mixed materials to clients in good standing, including empathy toys, Fitbits, launch pads or paper punches. If you don’t know what these items are, you can visit your library to find out.

Kozak-Selby and her team will be pleased to welcome you to any of the five branches that make up the County of Brant library system.

For more information call Burford at 519-449-5371, Glen Morris at 519-740-2122, Paris at 519-442-2433, Scotland at 519-446-0181 or St. George at 519-448-1300. Or visit their website at www.brant.ca/en/explore-our-services/library.

The library has something for all ages … books and so much more.