FOCUS ON SENIORS: Finding support through ARTC

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Sean Allen Brant News

‘Every community needs an adult day program like ARTC.”

That’s what Janice Schweder says about Brantford’s Adult Recreation Therapy Centre, or ARTC.

Janice’s husband, Frank, was admitted to the hospital in 2014 after a series of falls and with a serious infection. While in the hospital, doctors determined that he had early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

“I had suspected that Frank’s thought process was deteriorating,” Schweder said. “However, when the physicians confirmed Alzheimer’s it turned my world completely upside down.

“I was in denial. You are at a loss for words.”  

When Frank was ready to be discharged from the hospital Janice insisted that he come home. She didn’t want him to move to a long-term care facility. She studied up on Alzheimer’s, even took some courses, learning as much as she could.

“They suggested that Frank begin taking a medication to control the disease and go to a long-term care facility,” Janice said. “I was of the opinion that we should keep long-term care as an option and that we should let nature take its course to avoid all the complications of side effects that these types of medications may bring.

“It turns out that for us it was the best decision.”

At home, a team of personal support workers were assigned by the Community Care Access Centre to assist Frank with his morning routine.

“These women have been the impetus to our survival and coping with the situation,” Schweder said.

“Amanda, one of our personal support workers, strongly recommended the ARTC program. When I called, the program co-ordinator at ARTC came to the house. I knew then that we were moving in the right direction.”        

The Alzheimer Society of Brant has also been supportive.

“Joan Nelson encouraged me to enrol in the dementia education program offered by Laurie Ball,” Schweder said. “They have inspired me to never lose hope as we struggle through the various stages of the disease.”   

Frank attends the ARTC facility three days each week.  

“Frank absolutely loves it,” Janice said. “It has given him so much more confidence and awareness.

“He has a new circle of friends. He gathers with many different people who also have mobility issues and they learn from each other. The indoor track they have allows Frank to continue yearlong exercise.   

“The social time is so special and the ARTC staff is wonderful.”

Lori Santilli has been with ARTC for 23 years, 20 as executive director.

“ARTC is a community-based adult therapy program for people with compromised health – people suffering from a stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease,” Santilli said. “We aim to help people maintain an optimum level of physical ability, intellectual function and social interaction while at the same time provide support and information to caregivers.  

“Our staff includes recreational therapists, kinesiologists, a social worker, a speech language pathologist, a communication disorder specialist and fitness instructors for seniors.”

This past December ARTC moved into its new home at 58 Easton Rd. in Brantford. Funding comes from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network, Brant United Way, fundraising and user fees.

ARTC has expanded to include services throughout the community including falls prevention at 15 different sites, such as churches and community centres.

“We are creating a hub of services and aligning with like-minded organizations throughout our community,” Santilli said. “By filling a niche we can act as a navigator for people who often can be confused trying to find the right program. Our mantra is ‘no door is the wrong door.’”      

For further information about the Adult Recreation Therapy Centre visit www.artc.ca.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Finding support through ARTC

Adult Recreation Therapy Centre helps clients maintain quality of life

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Sean Allen Brant News

‘Every community needs an adult day program like ARTC.”

That’s what Janice Schweder says about Brantford’s Adult Recreation Therapy Centre, or ARTC.

Janice’s husband, Frank, was admitted to the hospital in 2014 after a series of falls and with a serious infection. While in the hospital, doctors determined that he had early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

“I had suspected that Frank’s thought process was deteriorating,” Schweder said. “However, when the physicians confirmed Alzheimer’s it turned my world completely upside down.

“I was in denial. You are at a loss for words.”  

When Frank was ready to be discharged from the hospital Janice insisted that he come home. She didn’t want him to move to a long-term care facility. She studied up on Alzheimer’s, even took some courses, learning as much as she could.

“They suggested that Frank begin taking a medication to control the disease and go to a long-term care facility,” Janice said. “I was of the opinion that we should keep long-term care as an option and that we should let nature take its course to avoid all the complications of side effects that these types of medications may bring.

“It turns out that for us it was the best decision.”

At home, a team of personal support workers were assigned by the Community Care Access Centre to assist Frank with his morning routine.

“These women have been the impetus to our survival and coping with the situation,” Schweder said.

“Amanda, one of our personal support workers, strongly recommended the ARTC program. When I called, the program co-ordinator at ARTC came to the house. I knew then that we were moving in the right direction.”        

The Alzheimer Society of Brant has also been supportive.

“Joan Nelson encouraged me to enrol in the dementia education program offered by Laurie Ball,” Schweder said. “They have inspired me to never lose hope as we struggle through the various stages of the disease.”   

Frank attends the ARTC facility three days each week.  

“Frank absolutely loves it,” Janice said. “It has given him so much more confidence and awareness.

“He has a new circle of friends. He gathers with many different people who also have mobility issues and they learn from each other. The indoor track they have allows Frank to continue yearlong exercise.   

“The social time is so special and the ARTC staff is wonderful.”

Lori Santilli has been with ARTC for 23 years, 20 as executive director.

“ARTC is a community-based adult therapy program for people with compromised health – people suffering from a stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease,” Santilli said. “We aim to help people maintain an optimum level of physical ability, intellectual function and social interaction while at the same time provide support and information to caregivers.  

“Our staff includes recreational therapists, kinesiologists, a social worker, a speech language pathologist, a communication disorder specialist and fitness instructors for seniors.”

This past December ARTC moved into its new home at 58 Easton Rd. in Brantford. Funding comes from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network, Brant United Way, fundraising and user fees.

ARTC has expanded to include services throughout the community including falls prevention at 15 different sites, such as churches and community centres.

“We are creating a hub of services and aligning with like-minded organizations throughout our community,” Santilli said. “By filling a niche we can act as a navigator for people who often can be confused trying to find the right program. Our mantra is ‘no door is the wrong door.’”      

For further information about the Adult Recreation Therapy Centre visit www.artc.ca.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Finding support through ARTC

Adult Recreation Therapy Centre helps clients maintain quality of life

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Sean Allen Brant News

‘Every community needs an adult day program like ARTC.”

That’s what Janice Schweder says about Brantford’s Adult Recreation Therapy Centre, or ARTC.

Janice’s husband, Frank, was admitted to the hospital in 2014 after a series of falls and with a serious infection. While in the hospital, doctors determined that he had early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

“I had suspected that Frank’s thought process was deteriorating,” Schweder said. “However, when the physicians confirmed Alzheimer’s it turned my world completely upside down.

“I was in denial. You are at a loss for words.”  

When Frank was ready to be discharged from the hospital Janice insisted that he come home. She didn’t want him to move to a long-term care facility. She studied up on Alzheimer’s, even took some courses, learning as much as she could.

“They suggested that Frank begin taking a medication to control the disease and go to a long-term care facility,” Janice said. “I was of the opinion that we should keep long-term care as an option and that we should let nature take its course to avoid all the complications of side effects that these types of medications may bring.

“It turns out that for us it was the best decision.”

At home, a team of personal support workers were assigned by the Community Care Access Centre to assist Frank with his morning routine.

“These women have been the impetus to our survival and coping with the situation,” Schweder said.

“Amanda, one of our personal support workers, strongly recommended the ARTC program. When I called, the program co-ordinator at ARTC came to the house. I knew then that we were moving in the right direction.”        

The Alzheimer Society of Brant has also been supportive.

“Joan Nelson encouraged me to enrol in the dementia education program offered by Laurie Ball,” Schweder said. “They have inspired me to never lose hope as we struggle through the various stages of the disease.”   

Frank attends the ARTC facility three days each week.  

“Frank absolutely loves it,” Janice said. “It has given him so much more confidence and awareness.

“He has a new circle of friends. He gathers with many different people who also have mobility issues and they learn from each other. The indoor track they have allows Frank to continue yearlong exercise.   

“The social time is so special and the ARTC staff is wonderful.”

Lori Santilli has been with ARTC for 23 years, 20 as executive director.

“ARTC is a community-based adult therapy program for people with compromised health – people suffering from a stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease,” Santilli said. “We aim to help people maintain an optimum level of physical ability, intellectual function and social interaction while at the same time provide support and information to caregivers.  

“Our staff includes recreational therapists, kinesiologists, a social worker, a speech language pathologist, a communication disorder specialist and fitness instructors for seniors.”

This past December ARTC moved into its new home at 58 Easton Rd. in Brantford. Funding comes from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network, Brant United Way, fundraising and user fees.

ARTC has expanded to include services throughout the community including falls prevention at 15 different sites, such as churches and community centres.

“We are creating a hub of services and aligning with like-minded organizations throughout our community,” Santilli said. “By filling a niche we can act as a navigator for people who often can be confused trying to find the right program. Our mantra is ‘no door is the wrong door.’”      

For further information about the Adult Recreation Therapy Centre visit www.artc.ca.