FOCUS ON SENIORS: Take a hike

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

For Sarah Otto, getting outdoors to experience nature is part of her routine. It’s become a lifestyle and she particularly enjoys canoeing and hiking.

When looking for a volunteer activity, she was drawn to the Grand Valley Trails Association (GVTA). She is upbeat and enthusiastic about her involvement with this association serving as the marketing director on the board of directors. It’s a good fit for Otto, enabling her to pass on her love of the outdoors and the joy of hiking, while furthering the goals and objectives of the association.

The mandate of the GVTA is to build and maintain hiking trails in the Grand River Valley. In addition, it also promotes healthy living that includes outdoor activities such as hiking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and canoeing.

The Grand Valley Trail is 275 kilometres long, stretching from Rockpoint Provincial Park on Lake Erie to the top of the pinnacle in Alton, a small village near Orangeville.

Trails provide everyone from young children to older adults from all backgrounds and abilities with the opportunity to be physically active. A physically active lifestyle improves physical and mental health as well as the quality of life. Trails also offer the opportunity to experience different environments.

Hiking is a relatively inexpensive sport – a pair of shoes with soles that grip, fit well, and keep your feet warm and dry is the only requirement. Some hikers use a hiking staff or trekking pole. They are standard equipment for many people as they enhance stability and provide support on all terrains. They also help distribute energy usage in a way that can help hiking endurance. A simple backpack or knapsack can carry a water bottle and a snack.

Canada Trails have suggested guidelines that help making hiking a safe and pleasant experience for everyone. If you drive to the starting point of the trail, be sure to park your car well off the road and away from private driveways. Be sure to stay on the trail. Deviating from the path can increase erosion and destroy vegetation. Keep dogs on leashes and be sure to clean up after them.

Otto lives to the standard “pack in, pack out” – always taking her garbage out with her. Other mottos for the trails include, “leave nothing behind, not even footprints,” and “take nothing except photographs.” Abiding by these simple guidelines will ensure safe, available trails for all to enjoy for many years to come.

Levels of difficulty for the trails begin with Level 1, which includes well-defined trails and gentle inclines. This level is suitable for beginners. The next level may be hilly, with some rough spots or obstacles. Boots are recommended for these trails. Lastly, Level 3 has rough terrain and may have steep sections, long climbs and descents. Hiking experience and a high level of fitness are essential for this level, and long pants and sleeves are recommended.

Hiking is an age-friendly activity and Otto would like to see more children and youth participate. The average age of the membership in the GVTA is over 55. She is trying to bring a youthful, fresh approach to encourage others to join in.

The GVTA is a volunteer organization that creates and maintains its trails through its membership, donations and sponsorships. They are always looking for volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities such as board membership or trail maintenance. For information on how to volunteer or to become a member go to www.gvta.on.ca or call 519-576-6156.

There are several other noteworthy trails in this area, which are maintained by the City of Brantford and the County of Brant. Some trails have been named after local citizens in recognition of their community service such as the Gordon Glaves Memorial Trail or for the company that supported trail development such as the SC Johnson Trail.

There is a full-colour, easy-to-read trail map on the city’s website www.brantford.ca. It shows 18 different access points and includes many points of interest to be found along the various trails.  

The County of Brant website www.brant.ca lists regional trails such as one going from Paris to Cambridge and GVTA and local trails such as the Apps Mill Trail and the Mount Pleasant Walking Tour.

Otto encourages people to enjoy any of the beautiful trails to experience nature and benefit from the physical activity.

“We have a beautiful, historic river running through our communities and should be proud of our heritage,” she said.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Take a hike

Grand Valley Trails Association encourages hiking as approachable exercise

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

For Sarah Otto, getting outdoors to experience nature is part of her routine. It’s become a lifestyle and she particularly enjoys canoeing and hiking.

When looking for a volunteer activity, she was drawn to the Grand Valley Trails Association (GVTA). She is upbeat and enthusiastic about her involvement with this association serving as the marketing director on the board of directors. It’s a good fit for Otto, enabling her to pass on her love of the outdoors and the joy of hiking, while furthering the goals and objectives of the association.

The mandate of the GVTA is to build and maintain hiking trails in the Grand River Valley. In addition, it also promotes healthy living that includes outdoor activities such as hiking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and canoeing.

The Grand Valley Trail is 275 kilometres long, stretching from Rockpoint Provincial Park on Lake Erie to the top of the pinnacle in Alton, a small village near Orangeville.

Trails provide everyone from young children to older adults from all backgrounds and abilities with the opportunity to be physically active. A physically active lifestyle improves physical and mental health as well as the quality of life. Trails also offer the opportunity to experience different environments.

Hiking is a relatively inexpensive sport – a pair of shoes with soles that grip, fit well, and keep your feet warm and dry is the only requirement. Some hikers use a hiking staff or trekking pole. They are standard equipment for many people as they enhance stability and provide support on all terrains. They also help distribute energy usage in a way that can help hiking endurance. A simple backpack or knapsack can carry a water bottle and a snack.

Canada Trails have suggested guidelines that help making hiking a safe and pleasant experience for everyone. If you drive to the starting point of the trail, be sure to park your car well off the road and away from private driveways. Be sure to stay on the trail. Deviating from the path can increase erosion and destroy vegetation. Keep dogs on leashes and be sure to clean up after them.

Otto lives to the standard “pack in, pack out” – always taking her garbage out with her. Other mottos for the trails include, “leave nothing behind, not even footprints,” and “take nothing except photographs.” Abiding by these simple guidelines will ensure safe, available trails for all to enjoy for many years to come.

Levels of difficulty for the trails begin with Level 1, which includes well-defined trails and gentle inclines. This level is suitable for beginners. The next level may be hilly, with some rough spots or obstacles. Boots are recommended for these trails. Lastly, Level 3 has rough terrain and may have steep sections, long climbs and descents. Hiking experience and a high level of fitness are essential for this level, and long pants and sleeves are recommended.

Hiking is an age-friendly activity and Otto would like to see more children and youth participate. The average age of the membership in the GVTA is over 55. She is trying to bring a youthful, fresh approach to encourage others to join in.

The GVTA is a volunteer organization that creates and maintains its trails through its membership, donations and sponsorships. They are always looking for volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities such as board membership or trail maintenance. For information on how to volunteer or to become a member go to www.gvta.on.ca or call 519-576-6156.

There are several other noteworthy trails in this area, which are maintained by the City of Brantford and the County of Brant. Some trails have been named after local citizens in recognition of their community service such as the Gordon Glaves Memorial Trail or for the company that supported trail development such as the SC Johnson Trail.

There is a full-colour, easy-to-read trail map on the city’s website www.brantford.ca. It shows 18 different access points and includes many points of interest to be found along the various trails.  

The County of Brant website www.brant.ca lists regional trails such as one going from Paris to Cambridge and GVTA and local trails such as the Apps Mill Trail and the Mount Pleasant Walking Tour.

Otto encourages people to enjoy any of the beautiful trails to experience nature and benefit from the physical activity.

“We have a beautiful, historic river running through our communities and should be proud of our heritage,” she said.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Take a hike

Grand Valley Trails Association encourages hiking as approachable exercise

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

For Sarah Otto, getting outdoors to experience nature is part of her routine. It’s become a lifestyle and she particularly enjoys canoeing and hiking.

When looking for a volunteer activity, she was drawn to the Grand Valley Trails Association (GVTA). She is upbeat and enthusiastic about her involvement with this association serving as the marketing director on the board of directors. It’s a good fit for Otto, enabling her to pass on her love of the outdoors and the joy of hiking, while furthering the goals and objectives of the association.

The mandate of the GVTA is to build and maintain hiking trails in the Grand River Valley. In addition, it also promotes healthy living that includes outdoor activities such as hiking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and canoeing.

The Grand Valley Trail is 275 kilometres long, stretching from Rockpoint Provincial Park on Lake Erie to the top of the pinnacle in Alton, a small village near Orangeville.

Trails provide everyone from young children to older adults from all backgrounds and abilities with the opportunity to be physically active. A physically active lifestyle improves physical and mental health as well as the quality of life. Trails also offer the opportunity to experience different environments.

Hiking is a relatively inexpensive sport – a pair of shoes with soles that grip, fit well, and keep your feet warm and dry is the only requirement. Some hikers use a hiking staff or trekking pole. They are standard equipment for many people as they enhance stability and provide support on all terrains. They also help distribute energy usage in a way that can help hiking endurance. A simple backpack or knapsack can carry a water bottle and a snack.

Canada Trails have suggested guidelines that help making hiking a safe and pleasant experience for everyone. If you drive to the starting point of the trail, be sure to park your car well off the road and away from private driveways. Be sure to stay on the trail. Deviating from the path can increase erosion and destroy vegetation. Keep dogs on leashes and be sure to clean up after them.

Otto lives to the standard “pack in, pack out” – always taking her garbage out with her. Other mottos for the trails include, “leave nothing behind, not even footprints,” and “take nothing except photographs.” Abiding by these simple guidelines will ensure safe, available trails for all to enjoy for many years to come.

Levels of difficulty for the trails begin with Level 1, which includes well-defined trails and gentle inclines. This level is suitable for beginners. The next level may be hilly, with some rough spots or obstacles. Boots are recommended for these trails. Lastly, Level 3 has rough terrain and may have steep sections, long climbs and descents. Hiking experience and a high level of fitness are essential for this level, and long pants and sleeves are recommended.

Hiking is an age-friendly activity and Otto would like to see more children and youth participate. The average age of the membership in the GVTA is over 55. She is trying to bring a youthful, fresh approach to encourage others to join in.

The GVTA is a volunteer organization that creates and maintains its trails through its membership, donations and sponsorships. They are always looking for volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities such as board membership or trail maintenance. For information on how to volunteer or to become a member go to www.gvta.on.ca or call 519-576-6156.

There are several other noteworthy trails in this area, which are maintained by the City of Brantford and the County of Brant. Some trails have been named after local citizens in recognition of their community service such as the Gordon Glaves Memorial Trail or for the company that supported trail development such as the SC Johnson Trail.

There is a full-colour, easy-to-read trail map on the city’s website www.brantford.ca. It shows 18 different access points and includes many points of interest to be found along the various trails.  

The County of Brant website www.brant.ca lists regional trails such as one going from Paris to Cambridge and GVTA and local trails such as the Apps Mill Trail and the Mount Pleasant Walking Tour.

Otto encourages people to enjoy any of the beautiful trails to experience nature and benefit from the physical activity.

“We have a beautiful, historic river running through our communities and should be proud of our heritage,” she said.