Torch relay provides priceless moments

Opinion Jun 26, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The look on Lucy Marco’s face as the doors to the bus opened and she saw the crowd awaiting her was priceless.

Family and friends had gathered on a bright, sunny day to cheer her on. It was an emotional moment for all, as she grasped the torch in one hand and her daughter’s arm in the other and made her way up Darling Street.

We followed along with her, giddy with excitement and emotional with pride as the 76-year-old mother, grandmother and great-grandmother became one of 3,000 individuals selected to carry the torch in the 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.   

Shouts of “Go Lucy!” followed her up the street.

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) is a presenting partner of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.  Through the OLG “Pass it Ontario Program,” chambers of commerce and boards of trade from across the province were asked to select a local resident to carry the Pan Am torch as it makes its way through their communities. Torchbearer selections were made based on the core characteristics of the torch relay: community, celebration, participation and pride.

The torch relay is a 41-day journey that shares the Pan Am spirit in more than 130 communities. The flame was lit during a traditional ceremony in Teotihuacan, Mexico, before it travelled to Canada. It will travel more than 5,000 kilometres by road, 15,000 kilometres by air and through 130 communities before it arrives in Toronto, where it will light the cauldron at the opening ceremony.

The Pan Am schedule runs from July 7 to July 26 and covers all 36 Pan Am Games sports from archery to wrestling.

Brantford resident Erika Polidori, a competitor at the games as a member of the Canadian women’s softball team, handed Marco the torch. It was a beautiful moment to watch the two women – in an “age-to-age” manoeuvre – as the torch transferred from a young athlete to a great-grandmother.

Dressed in the official clothing, both women wore the torchbearer uniform which displays the contemporary design of the energetic and playfulness of the brand and captures the spirit of the games. The colourful “United we Play” pictograms featured on the torchbearer uniform represent the coming together of sport and culture.

Marco is the president of the Grand River Council on Aging. She wears many hats, one of which was the first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce Brantford-Brant. It makes sense that she would be the chamber representative.

Throughout her long career of community service, she has worked tirelessly on behalf of others. She has carried the torch in other ways.  Many programs, services and initiatives in the City of Brantford and the County of Brant are richer for having her leadership and input.   

She was incredibly honoured and humbled to be invited to carry the torch, and with her indomitable spirit, she gave it everything she had to do the job well.   

Marco exemplifies the spirit of the games. The values of community, celebration, participation and pride are evident in every role she has assumed.   

A typical work week for this community advocate keeps her on the go, moving from meeting to presentation, to appointment to presentation, from morning to night. That doesn’t take into account her personal activities which include bridge, Scrabble, lifetime girls’ club with her best friends and camping. How she fits it in is incredible and her schedule would put a younger person to shame.   

We can learn a lot from the lived experience of Marco and others like her. What’s been termed, the “Second Act” or the “Encore” has become a stage in life, that many older adults are embracing and truly living life to the fullest.

When thinking about the type of person that should carry a torch for the games, a young athlete first comes to mind. Indeed, many, many young athletes did carry the torch. Incredibly though, many older adults were also afforded the privilege.   

Bringing people together in the spirit of the Pan Am Games, blending youth with lived experience in the choice of torchbearers, is definitely age-friendly.

How wonderful that for a few precious hours on a sunny summer day, Brantford became part of the 2015 Toronto Pan Am Games.  People gathered at the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre and later in Harmony Square and all along the route to welcome people of all ages coming together in the spirit of community, celebration, participation and pride.

And that too, is priceless.

Torch relay provides priceless moments

GRCOA president Lucy Marco a part of Pan Am relay

Opinion Jun 26, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The look on Lucy Marco’s face as the doors to the bus opened and she saw the crowd awaiting her was priceless.

Family and friends had gathered on a bright, sunny day to cheer her on. It was an emotional moment for all, as she grasped the torch in one hand and her daughter’s arm in the other and made her way up Darling Street.

We followed along with her, giddy with excitement and emotional with pride as the 76-year-old mother, grandmother and great-grandmother became one of 3,000 individuals selected to carry the torch in the 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.   

Shouts of “Go Lucy!” followed her up the street.

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) is a presenting partner of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.  Through the OLG “Pass it Ontario Program,” chambers of commerce and boards of trade from across the province were asked to select a local resident to carry the Pan Am torch as it makes its way through their communities. Torchbearer selections were made based on the core characteristics of the torch relay: community, celebration, participation and pride.

The torch relay is a 41-day journey that shares the Pan Am spirit in more than 130 communities. The flame was lit during a traditional ceremony in Teotihuacan, Mexico, before it travelled to Canada. It will travel more than 5,000 kilometres by road, 15,000 kilometres by air and through 130 communities before it arrives in Toronto, where it will light the cauldron at the opening ceremony.

The Pan Am schedule runs from July 7 to July 26 and covers all 36 Pan Am Games sports from archery to wrestling.

Brantford resident Erika Polidori, a competitor at the games as a member of the Canadian women’s softball team, handed Marco the torch. It was a beautiful moment to watch the two women – in an “age-to-age” manoeuvre – as the torch transferred from a young athlete to a great-grandmother.

Dressed in the official clothing, both women wore the torchbearer uniform which displays the contemporary design of the energetic and playfulness of the brand and captures the spirit of the games. The colourful “United we Play” pictograms featured on the torchbearer uniform represent the coming together of sport and culture.

Marco is the president of the Grand River Council on Aging. She wears many hats, one of which was the first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce Brantford-Brant. It makes sense that she would be the chamber representative.

Throughout her long career of community service, she has worked tirelessly on behalf of others. She has carried the torch in other ways.  Many programs, services and initiatives in the City of Brantford and the County of Brant are richer for having her leadership and input.   

She was incredibly honoured and humbled to be invited to carry the torch, and with her indomitable spirit, she gave it everything she had to do the job well.   

Marco exemplifies the spirit of the games. The values of community, celebration, participation and pride are evident in every role she has assumed.   

A typical work week for this community advocate keeps her on the go, moving from meeting to presentation, to appointment to presentation, from morning to night. That doesn’t take into account her personal activities which include bridge, Scrabble, lifetime girls’ club with her best friends and camping. How she fits it in is incredible and her schedule would put a younger person to shame.   

We can learn a lot from the lived experience of Marco and others like her. What’s been termed, the “Second Act” or the “Encore” has become a stage in life, that many older adults are embracing and truly living life to the fullest.

When thinking about the type of person that should carry a torch for the games, a young athlete first comes to mind. Indeed, many, many young athletes did carry the torch. Incredibly though, many older adults were also afforded the privilege.   

Bringing people together in the spirit of the Pan Am Games, blending youth with lived experience in the choice of torchbearers, is definitely age-friendly.

How wonderful that for a few precious hours on a sunny summer day, Brantford became part of the 2015 Toronto Pan Am Games.  People gathered at the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre and later in Harmony Square and all along the route to welcome people of all ages coming together in the spirit of community, celebration, participation and pride.

And that too, is priceless.

Torch relay provides priceless moments

GRCOA president Lucy Marco a part of Pan Am relay

Opinion Jun 26, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

The look on Lucy Marco’s face as the doors to the bus opened and she saw the crowd awaiting her was priceless.

Family and friends had gathered on a bright, sunny day to cheer her on. It was an emotional moment for all, as she grasped the torch in one hand and her daughter’s arm in the other and made her way up Darling Street.

We followed along with her, giddy with excitement and emotional with pride as the 76-year-old mother, grandmother and great-grandmother became one of 3,000 individuals selected to carry the torch in the 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.   

Shouts of “Go Lucy!” followed her up the street.

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) is a presenting partner of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games torch relay.  Through the OLG “Pass it Ontario Program,” chambers of commerce and boards of trade from across the province were asked to select a local resident to carry the Pan Am torch as it makes its way through their communities. Torchbearer selections were made based on the core characteristics of the torch relay: community, celebration, participation and pride.

The torch relay is a 41-day journey that shares the Pan Am spirit in more than 130 communities. The flame was lit during a traditional ceremony in Teotihuacan, Mexico, before it travelled to Canada. It will travel more than 5,000 kilometres by road, 15,000 kilometres by air and through 130 communities before it arrives in Toronto, where it will light the cauldron at the opening ceremony.

The Pan Am schedule runs from July 7 to July 26 and covers all 36 Pan Am Games sports from archery to wrestling.

Brantford resident Erika Polidori, a competitor at the games as a member of the Canadian women’s softball team, handed Marco the torch. It was a beautiful moment to watch the two women – in an “age-to-age” manoeuvre – as the torch transferred from a young athlete to a great-grandmother.

Dressed in the official clothing, both women wore the torchbearer uniform which displays the contemporary design of the energetic and playfulness of the brand and captures the spirit of the games. The colourful “United we Play” pictograms featured on the torchbearer uniform represent the coming together of sport and culture.

Marco is the president of the Grand River Council on Aging. She wears many hats, one of which was the first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce Brantford-Brant. It makes sense that she would be the chamber representative.

Throughout her long career of community service, she has worked tirelessly on behalf of others. She has carried the torch in other ways.  Many programs, services and initiatives in the City of Brantford and the County of Brant are richer for having her leadership and input.   

She was incredibly honoured and humbled to be invited to carry the torch, and with her indomitable spirit, she gave it everything she had to do the job well.   

Marco exemplifies the spirit of the games. The values of community, celebration, participation and pride are evident in every role she has assumed.   

A typical work week for this community advocate keeps her on the go, moving from meeting to presentation, to appointment to presentation, from morning to night. That doesn’t take into account her personal activities which include bridge, Scrabble, lifetime girls’ club with her best friends and camping. How she fits it in is incredible and her schedule would put a younger person to shame.   

We can learn a lot from the lived experience of Marco and others like her. What’s been termed, the “Second Act” or the “Encore” has become a stage in life, that many older adults are embracing and truly living life to the fullest.

When thinking about the type of person that should carry a torch for the games, a young athlete first comes to mind. Indeed, many, many young athletes did carry the torch. Incredibly though, many older adults were also afforded the privilege.   

Bringing people together in the spirit of the Pan Am Games, blending youth with lived experience in the choice of torchbearers, is definitely age-friendly.

How wonderful that for a few precious hours on a sunny summer day, Brantford became part of the 2015 Toronto Pan Am Games.  People gathered at the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre and later in Harmony Square and all along the route to welcome people of all ages coming together in the spirit of community, celebration, participation and pride.

And that too, is priceless.