FOCUS ON SENIORS: Build it and they will learn

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Anne and Terry Robinson have a way with hammers and nails.

Between the two of them they have helped build more than 20 homes. This summer they have two more on the books.  

“I have always enjoyed working with my hands,” 72-year-old Terry said. “I was born and raised in St. Mary’s, Ontario, where I was very active on my parents’ farm.”  

Terry’s wife Anne, who celebrated her 69th birthday last month, was raised in Whitby, east of Toronto, also on a farm.

After secondary school, Anne studied to become a registered nurse, while Terry became an engineer.   

In 1972, the couple moved to the rural village of Harley – outside of Burford – when Terry was hired as an engineer with White Farm Equipment. Anne worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Brantford until she retired in 2000.  

“A friend of ours, Bill Welch, a shop instructor at W. Ross Macdonald School, knew that I liked to work with my hands, so he asked me to join the first Habitat for Humanity build in Brantford in 1999,” Terry said. “Anne and I have been involved with every home build since.”  

Anne also contributed to the first home build by preparing food for the volunteer workers. In between using kitchen utensils, Anne picked up a hammer.  

“I can do pretty well anything in construction,” Anne said with a smile.  

According to Terry, Anne does the things that make the homes look good, noting, “She caulks around the doors and does the touch-up painting.”  

Habitat for Humanity Brant is a non-profit, charitable organization that serves low-income residents throughout Brantford and Brant to help make home ownership a reality.  

“You are helping someone have their own home,” Anne said. “It is very meaningful for the people we build a home for. And because they help out we form friendships.”

Terry describes the satisfaction he receives: “When you build a house in a very short period of time like we do with Habitat for Humanity, you see significant progress and accomplishment.”  

By the end of this year, the Robinsons will have helped build all 20 homes Habitat for Humanity has built in Brantford.  

But there is more.  

Habitat for Humanity Canada has developed a presence throughout the world with their Global Village initiative. Volunteers travel to approximately 90 countries around the world to bring home ownership to others in need. 

“So far, Anne and I have joined teams building homes in Hungary, Kenya, Thailand, Bolivia, Ethiopia, Nepal and Portugal,” Terry said. “You spend a week or so building a home, then relax for a few days before returning home.”  

Global Village builds consist of teams of 10 to 15 people of many ages.

“You get to work alongside local people and learn about their country and its culture,” Terry said. “What the young folks may lack in experience they certainly make up with enthusiasm.”  

“We did our first Global Village build in 2008,” Anne said. “We try to go twice each year.”  

As seniors, the Robinsons plan to continue their work with Habitat for Humanity, saying that “as long as our health is fine we won’t be taking off our tool belts.”

The Robinsons are proud of the craftsmanship of the home the volunteers build.  

“I feel very, very confident saying the quality of our homes stack up favourably to a professionally built home,” Terry said. “We wouldn’t want anyone to say that their Habitat for Humanity home isn’t very good quality.”

Habitat for Humanity, Brant will begin their next home build this month. Volunteers should contact Lynn Davidson at 519-759-8600, ext. 28.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Build it and they will learn

Brant seniors devoted to Habitat for Humanity

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Anne and Terry Robinson have a way with hammers and nails.

Between the two of them they have helped build more than 20 homes. This summer they have two more on the books.  

“I have always enjoyed working with my hands,” 72-year-old Terry said. “I was born and raised in St. Mary’s, Ontario, where I was very active on my parents’ farm.”  

Terry’s wife Anne, who celebrated her 69th birthday last month, was raised in Whitby, east of Toronto, also on a farm.

After secondary school, Anne studied to become a registered nurse, while Terry became an engineer.   

In 1972, the couple moved to the rural village of Harley – outside of Burford – when Terry was hired as an engineer with White Farm Equipment. Anne worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Brantford until she retired in 2000.  

“A friend of ours, Bill Welch, a shop instructor at W. Ross Macdonald School, knew that I liked to work with my hands, so he asked me to join the first Habitat for Humanity build in Brantford in 1999,” Terry said. “Anne and I have been involved with every home build since.”  

Anne also contributed to the first home build by preparing food for the volunteer workers. In between using kitchen utensils, Anne picked up a hammer.  

“I can do pretty well anything in construction,” Anne said with a smile.  

According to Terry, Anne does the things that make the homes look good, noting, “She caulks around the doors and does the touch-up painting.”  

Habitat for Humanity Brant is a non-profit, charitable organization that serves low-income residents throughout Brantford and Brant to help make home ownership a reality.  

“You are helping someone have their own home,” Anne said. “It is very meaningful for the people we build a home for. And because they help out we form friendships.”

Terry describes the satisfaction he receives: “When you build a house in a very short period of time like we do with Habitat for Humanity, you see significant progress and accomplishment.”  

By the end of this year, the Robinsons will have helped build all 20 homes Habitat for Humanity has built in Brantford.  

But there is more.  

Habitat for Humanity Canada has developed a presence throughout the world with their Global Village initiative. Volunteers travel to approximately 90 countries around the world to bring home ownership to others in need. 

“So far, Anne and I have joined teams building homes in Hungary, Kenya, Thailand, Bolivia, Ethiopia, Nepal and Portugal,” Terry said. “You spend a week or so building a home, then relax for a few days before returning home.”  

Global Village builds consist of teams of 10 to 15 people of many ages.

“You get to work alongside local people and learn about their country and its culture,” Terry said. “What the young folks may lack in experience they certainly make up with enthusiasm.”  

“We did our first Global Village build in 2008,” Anne said. “We try to go twice each year.”  

As seniors, the Robinsons plan to continue their work with Habitat for Humanity, saying that “as long as our health is fine we won’t be taking off our tool belts.”

The Robinsons are proud of the craftsmanship of the home the volunteers build.  

“I feel very, very confident saying the quality of our homes stack up favourably to a professionally built home,” Terry said. “We wouldn’t want anyone to say that their Habitat for Humanity home isn’t very good quality.”

Habitat for Humanity, Brant will begin their next home build this month. Volunteers should contact Lynn Davidson at 519-759-8600, ext. 28.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Build it and they will learn

Brant seniors devoted to Habitat for Humanity

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Anne and Terry Robinson have a way with hammers and nails.

Between the two of them they have helped build more than 20 homes. This summer they have two more on the books.  

“I have always enjoyed working with my hands,” 72-year-old Terry said. “I was born and raised in St. Mary’s, Ontario, where I was very active on my parents’ farm.”  

Terry’s wife Anne, who celebrated her 69th birthday last month, was raised in Whitby, east of Toronto, also on a farm.

After secondary school, Anne studied to become a registered nurse, while Terry became an engineer.   

In 1972, the couple moved to the rural village of Harley – outside of Burford – when Terry was hired as an engineer with White Farm Equipment. Anne worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Brantford until she retired in 2000.  

“A friend of ours, Bill Welch, a shop instructor at W. Ross Macdonald School, knew that I liked to work with my hands, so he asked me to join the first Habitat for Humanity build in Brantford in 1999,” Terry said. “Anne and I have been involved with every home build since.”  

Anne also contributed to the first home build by preparing food for the volunteer workers. In between using kitchen utensils, Anne picked up a hammer.  

“I can do pretty well anything in construction,” Anne said with a smile.  

According to Terry, Anne does the things that make the homes look good, noting, “She caulks around the doors and does the touch-up painting.”  

Habitat for Humanity Brant is a non-profit, charitable organization that serves low-income residents throughout Brantford and Brant to help make home ownership a reality.  

“You are helping someone have their own home,” Anne said. “It is very meaningful for the people we build a home for. And because they help out we form friendships.”

Terry describes the satisfaction he receives: “When you build a house in a very short period of time like we do with Habitat for Humanity, you see significant progress and accomplishment.”  

By the end of this year, the Robinsons will have helped build all 20 homes Habitat for Humanity has built in Brantford.  

But there is more.  

Habitat for Humanity Canada has developed a presence throughout the world with their Global Village initiative. Volunteers travel to approximately 90 countries around the world to bring home ownership to others in need. 

“So far, Anne and I have joined teams building homes in Hungary, Kenya, Thailand, Bolivia, Ethiopia, Nepal and Portugal,” Terry said. “You spend a week or so building a home, then relax for a few days before returning home.”  

Global Village builds consist of teams of 10 to 15 people of many ages.

“You get to work alongside local people and learn about their country and its culture,” Terry said. “What the young folks may lack in experience they certainly make up with enthusiasm.”  

“We did our first Global Village build in 2008,” Anne said. “We try to go twice each year.”  

As seniors, the Robinsons plan to continue their work with Habitat for Humanity, saying that “as long as our health is fine we won’t be taking off our tool belts.”

The Robinsons are proud of the craftsmanship of the home the volunteers build.  

“I feel very, very confident saying the quality of our homes stack up favourably to a professionally built home,” Terry said. “We wouldn’t want anyone to say that their Habitat for Humanity home isn’t very good quality.”

Habitat for Humanity, Brant will begin their next home build this month. Volunteers should contact Lynn Davidson at 519-759-8600, ext. 28.