ALLEN: Can you find the Escape Key?

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Sean Allen Brant News

The first rule of Escape Key is that I can’t talk about Escape Key.

At least, not the specifics of the puzzles, mystery, intrigue, riddles and code-breaking that takes place within the game itself.

To reveal much more than the fact that it was a boatload of fun, would be to spoil some of that fun for the rest of you.

Having not participated in an escape room game before, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was aware of the popularity of the business model, with more than 40 of them purported to be located within the GTA.

But there wasn’t one in Brantford, so I had never had the chance to try one out.

Escape Key is a work of passion by a group of friends and family.

The group is made up of Steve Tibbett and Samantha Tibbett, Carl Madden and Kaitlynn Denton, Amanda Madden, Wendy and Kim Shaver, Karina Hunter and her husband Dan, as well as their daughter Devin.

“We noticed there isn’t a lot to do for family fun and adventures,” Karina Hunter said. “We had so much fun at the (escape room) in Kitchener-Waterloo, we decided we needed to do this.”

Six months of work went in to building an escape room that goes the extra mile – both in its intricacy and design.

I don’t have a baseline for comparison, but the fact that my wife and I were researching other escape rooms in the region over lunch afterward should be an indicator of how much fun it was.

In fact, I’ll take it one step further – we spent even more time planning on how to go back to Escape Key and try the same adventure again to get even further.

Yes, alas, we did not make it out.

The storyline for the group’s first escape room is that you have been hired by a company to convince the fictional Lady Evelyn to sell her family’s research. You’ve been warned not to continue to pester her.

As a result, you start in a room, handcuffed and with a clock ticking down from 60 minutes before you will meet “a terrible end.”

You might think that an escape room is a one-and-done experience, and that may be the case if you make it out. But not reaching the end leaves me wanting another chance, even though the first part of the adventure won’t surprise me.

There is a score system in place. The “Brant Gnus” team – myself, my wife Trista, Norfolk News editor J.P. Antonacci and his friend Alex – managed to get the highest score so far based on how far we made it to the game and the completion of a number of side challenges.

Escape Key is celebrating a grand opening this weekend by offering gifts and a $200 prize for the best score this weekend.

There are no walk-ins to the 20 Roy Blvd. facility. An appointment must be booked online at EscapeKey.ca.

You need a minimum of four players on the weekend, but eight can be accommodated. And trust me, the more the merrier.

ALLEN: Can you find the Escape Key?

New adventure business tests limits of puzzle solving and fun

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Sean Allen Brant News

The first rule of Escape Key is that I can’t talk about Escape Key.

At least, not the specifics of the puzzles, mystery, intrigue, riddles and code-breaking that takes place within the game itself.

To reveal much more than the fact that it was a boatload of fun, would be to spoil some of that fun for the rest of you.

Having not participated in an escape room game before, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was aware of the popularity of the business model, with more than 40 of them purported to be located within the GTA.

But there wasn’t one in Brantford, so I had never had the chance to try one out.

Escape Key is a work of passion by a group of friends and family.

The group is made up of Steve Tibbett and Samantha Tibbett, Carl Madden and Kaitlynn Denton, Amanda Madden, Wendy and Kim Shaver, Karina Hunter and her husband Dan, as well as their daughter Devin.

“We noticed there isn’t a lot to do for family fun and adventures,” Karina Hunter said. “We had so much fun at the (escape room) in Kitchener-Waterloo, we decided we needed to do this.”

Six months of work went in to building an escape room that goes the extra mile – both in its intricacy and design.

I don’t have a baseline for comparison, but the fact that my wife and I were researching other escape rooms in the region over lunch afterward should be an indicator of how much fun it was.

In fact, I’ll take it one step further – we spent even more time planning on how to go back to Escape Key and try the same adventure again to get even further.

Yes, alas, we did not make it out.

The storyline for the group’s first escape room is that you have been hired by a company to convince the fictional Lady Evelyn to sell her family’s research. You’ve been warned not to continue to pester her.

As a result, you start in a room, handcuffed and with a clock ticking down from 60 minutes before you will meet “a terrible end.”

You might think that an escape room is a one-and-done experience, and that may be the case if you make it out. But not reaching the end leaves me wanting another chance, even though the first part of the adventure won’t surprise me.

There is a score system in place. The “Brant Gnus” team – myself, my wife Trista, Norfolk News editor J.P. Antonacci and his friend Alex – managed to get the highest score so far based on how far we made it to the game and the completion of a number of side challenges.

Escape Key is celebrating a grand opening this weekend by offering gifts and a $200 prize for the best score this weekend.

There are no walk-ins to the 20 Roy Blvd. facility. An appointment must be booked online at EscapeKey.ca.

You need a minimum of four players on the weekend, but eight can be accommodated. And trust me, the more the merrier.

ALLEN: Can you find the Escape Key?

New adventure business tests limits of puzzle solving and fun

Opinion May 06, 2015 by Sean Allen Brant News

The first rule of Escape Key is that I can’t talk about Escape Key.

At least, not the specifics of the puzzles, mystery, intrigue, riddles and code-breaking that takes place within the game itself.

To reveal much more than the fact that it was a boatload of fun, would be to spoil some of that fun for the rest of you.

Having not participated in an escape room game before, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was aware of the popularity of the business model, with more than 40 of them purported to be located within the GTA.

But there wasn’t one in Brantford, so I had never had the chance to try one out.

Escape Key is a work of passion by a group of friends and family.

The group is made up of Steve Tibbett and Samantha Tibbett, Carl Madden and Kaitlynn Denton, Amanda Madden, Wendy and Kim Shaver, Karina Hunter and her husband Dan, as well as their daughter Devin.

“We noticed there isn’t a lot to do for family fun and adventures,” Karina Hunter said. “We had so much fun at the (escape room) in Kitchener-Waterloo, we decided we needed to do this.”

Six months of work went in to building an escape room that goes the extra mile – both in its intricacy and design.

I don’t have a baseline for comparison, but the fact that my wife and I were researching other escape rooms in the region over lunch afterward should be an indicator of how much fun it was.

In fact, I’ll take it one step further – we spent even more time planning on how to go back to Escape Key and try the same adventure again to get even further.

Yes, alas, we did not make it out.

The storyline for the group’s first escape room is that you have been hired by a company to convince the fictional Lady Evelyn to sell her family’s research. You’ve been warned not to continue to pester her.

As a result, you start in a room, handcuffed and with a clock ticking down from 60 minutes before you will meet “a terrible end.”

You might think that an escape room is a one-and-done experience, and that may be the case if you make it out. But not reaching the end leaves me wanting another chance, even though the first part of the adventure won’t surprise me.

There is a score system in place. The “Brant Gnus” team – myself, my wife Trista, Norfolk News editor J.P. Antonacci and his friend Alex – managed to get the highest score so far based on how far we made it to the game and the completion of a number of side challenges.

Escape Key is celebrating a grand opening this weekend by offering gifts and a $200 prize for the best score this weekend.

There are no walk-ins to the 20 Roy Blvd. facility. An appointment must be booked online at EscapeKey.ca.

You need a minimum of four players on the weekend, but eight can be accommodated. And trust me, the more the merrier.