FOCUS ON SENIORS: Your golden years: a time of possibilities

Opinion Jan 29, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

As communities realize the changing age demographics, with older adults representing the largest category, many other forecasts have also come to light.  

Predictions about the increased burden on our health-care system, housing and transportation needs, while possibly accurate, fail to take into account the positive aspects of growing older from the individual perspective.  

What’s it like to be an older adult? It’s not all doom and gloom.

The golden years can be a time to imagine new possibilities. The golden years represent a true gift of time when older adults can pursue interests and hobbies. Some have even returned to school. Now that Brantford is a university town, older adults have the opportunity to study for a degree.

More and more people are choosing to remain in the workforce longer or are returning to work in some other capacity after having retired. For some this is a choice, for others a necessity. Some are having second or third careers.

Seniors have the chance to examine life and its many possibilities. They can use their years of experience to reach even higher, not wind down. This can be a time to achieve aspirations. It can be a time to develop new skills, to learn and discover new interests and pastimes.  

Older adults can use their life experience to carve out new paths.  

For one thing, seniors are enjoying their grandchildren. In many cases, people have been able to retire much earlier than their parents. With improved health and secure incomes, they have the time and resources to engage actively with the next generation.  

Grandparents are even able to enjoy grandchildren living abroad or across the country  through the wonderful inventions of email, texting, social media or Skype.  

Retirees are engaged in their communities, too. Many volunteer. They join local seniors clubs. They golf or they paint. They might seek out new friends and experiences in a social club. For some, it’s a time to become more active in their church. Regardless of education, background or socioeconomic status, one thing older adults all have in common is time.  

Social clubs for seniors are very popular in our community. One example is Probus, which is a social club for retirees from business and professional backgrounds.  

In our area, there are six Probus clubs, four for women and two for men.  

Neighbourhood seniors clubs are another attractive option for older adults to consider. There are seven neighbourhood clubs in Brantford and one in the County of Brant to choose from.  They are the Beckett Friendship Club, Bellview Club, Brant Towers Club, Charlotte Street Club, Eagle Place Club, King George Club, Woodman Park Club and Paris Seniors Club. 

The Beckett Adult Leisure Centre is another location offering programs for older adults.  Members of this centre enjoy programs geared toward keeping their bodies fit and minds active, while providing opportunities to socialize and interact with their peers. They have drop-in activities as well as special interest instructional programs that require registration.

The GRCOA wants to visit seniors where they congregate. Last week, COMPASS coaches attended the Eagle Place Seniors Club weekly meeting on Erie Avenue.  

This was an exciting moment for the GRCOA and its COMPASS coaches, who are trained to consult with seniors and are seniors themselves.    They share a strong passion to give back to the community and are adept at listening to seniors’ stories. They also conduct research for the GRCOA to report back to the community.

Every club or organization geared to seniors is an opportunity for fellowship, socialization, learning and fun.  Opportunities abound.  Seniors can even be found at the Boys and Girls Club, the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre, the Brantford Public Library and County of Brant libraries.

Seniors looking for other pursuits could choose to serve as educators, mentors, advisers and coaches. The next generations will benefit from their accumulated wisdom and experience.

Living longer is a remarkable accomplishment. However, to capture the full benefits of advanced age, seniors should reflect on two things: the time they’ve been given and what they’re going to do with it. It’s about quality and purpose.

If you think of life as a journey, aging provides jogs in the road with awesome potential.

The golden years can be fabulous. Just imagine the possibilities.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Your golden years: a time of possibilities

How seniors can keep active and make a contribution to community

Opinion Jan 29, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

As communities realize the changing age demographics, with older adults representing the largest category, many other forecasts have also come to light.  

Predictions about the increased burden on our health-care system, housing and transportation needs, while possibly accurate, fail to take into account the positive aspects of growing older from the individual perspective.  

What’s it like to be an older adult? It’s not all doom and gloom.

The golden years can be a time to imagine new possibilities. The golden years represent a true gift of time when older adults can pursue interests and hobbies. Some have even returned to school. Now that Brantford is a university town, older adults have the opportunity to study for a degree.

More and more people are choosing to remain in the workforce longer or are returning to work in some other capacity after having retired. For some this is a choice, for others a necessity. Some are having second or third careers.

Seniors have the chance to examine life and its many possibilities. They can use their years of experience to reach even higher, not wind down. This can be a time to achieve aspirations. It can be a time to develop new skills, to learn and discover new interests and pastimes.  

Older adults can use their life experience to carve out new paths.  

For one thing, seniors are enjoying their grandchildren. In many cases, people have been able to retire much earlier than their parents. With improved health and secure incomes, they have the time and resources to engage actively with the next generation.  

Grandparents are even able to enjoy grandchildren living abroad or across the country  through the wonderful inventions of email, texting, social media or Skype.  

Retirees are engaged in their communities, too. Many volunteer. They join local seniors clubs. They golf or they paint. They might seek out new friends and experiences in a social club. For some, it’s a time to become more active in their church. Regardless of education, background or socioeconomic status, one thing older adults all have in common is time.  

Social clubs for seniors are very popular in our community. One example is Probus, which is a social club for retirees from business and professional backgrounds.  

In our area, there are six Probus clubs, four for women and two for men.  

Neighbourhood seniors clubs are another attractive option for older adults to consider. There are seven neighbourhood clubs in Brantford and one in the County of Brant to choose from.  They are the Beckett Friendship Club, Bellview Club, Brant Towers Club, Charlotte Street Club, Eagle Place Club, King George Club, Woodman Park Club and Paris Seniors Club. 

The Beckett Adult Leisure Centre is another location offering programs for older adults.  Members of this centre enjoy programs geared toward keeping their bodies fit and minds active, while providing opportunities to socialize and interact with their peers. They have drop-in activities as well as special interest instructional programs that require registration.

The GRCOA wants to visit seniors where they congregate. Last week, COMPASS coaches attended the Eagle Place Seniors Club weekly meeting on Erie Avenue.  

This was an exciting moment for the GRCOA and its COMPASS coaches, who are trained to consult with seniors and are seniors themselves.    They share a strong passion to give back to the community and are adept at listening to seniors’ stories. They also conduct research for the GRCOA to report back to the community.

Every club or organization geared to seniors is an opportunity for fellowship, socialization, learning and fun.  Opportunities abound.  Seniors can even be found at the Boys and Girls Club, the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre, the Brantford Public Library and County of Brant libraries.

Seniors looking for other pursuits could choose to serve as educators, mentors, advisers and coaches. The next generations will benefit from their accumulated wisdom and experience.

Living longer is a remarkable accomplishment. However, to capture the full benefits of advanced age, seniors should reflect on two things: the time they’ve been given and what they’re going to do with it. It’s about quality and purpose.

If you think of life as a journey, aging provides jogs in the road with awesome potential.

The golden years can be fabulous. Just imagine the possibilities.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Your golden years: a time of possibilities

How seniors can keep active and make a contribution to community

Opinion Jan 29, 2015 by Kathryn Poirier Brant News

As communities realize the changing age demographics, with older adults representing the largest category, many other forecasts have also come to light.  

Predictions about the increased burden on our health-care system, housing and transportation needs, while possibly accurate, fail to take into account the positive aspects of growing older from the individual perspective.  

What’s it like to be an older adult? It’s not all doom and gloom.

The golden years can be a time to imagine new possibilities. The golden years represent a true gift of time when older adults can pursue interests and hobbies. Some have even returned to school. Now that Brantford is a university town, older adults have the opportunity to study for a degree.

More and more people are choosing to remain in the workforce longer or are returning to work in some other capacity after having retired. For some this is a choice, for others a necessity. Some are having second or third careers.

Seniors have the chance to examine life and its many possibilities. They can use their years of experience to reach even higher, not wind down. This can be a time to achieve aspirations. It can be a time to develop new skills, to learn and discover new interests and pastimes.  

Older adults can use their life experience to carve out new paths.  

For one thing, seniors are enjoying their grandchildren. In many cases, people have been able to retire much earlier than their parents. With improved health and secure incomes, they have the time and resources to engage actively with the next generation.  

Grandparents are even able to enjoy grandchildren living abroad or across the country  through the wonderful inventions of email, texting, social media or Skype.  

Retirees are engaged in their communities, too. Many volunteer. They join local seniors clubs. They golf or they paint. They might seek out new friends and experiences in a social club. For some, it’s a time to become more active in their church. Regardless of education, background or socioeconomic status, one thing older adults all have in common is time.  

Social clubs for seniors are very popular in our community. One example is Probus, which is a social club for retirees from business and professional backgrounds.  

In our area, there are six Probus clubs, four for women and two for men.  

Neighbourhood seniors clubs are another attractive option for older adults to consider. There are seven neighbourhood clubs in Brantford and one in the County of Brant to choose from.  They are the Beckett Friendship Club, Bellview Club, Brant Towers Club, Charlotte Street Club, Eagle Place Club, King George Club, Woodman Park Club and Paris Seniors Club. 

The Beckett Adult Leisure Centre is another location offering programs for older adults.  Members of this centre enjoy programs geared toward keeping their bodies fit and minds active, while providing opportunities to socialize and interact with their peers. They have drop-in activities as well as special interest instructional programs that require registration.

The GRCOA wants to visit seniors where they congregate. Last week, COMPASS coaches attended the Eagle Place Seniors Club weekly meeting on Erie Avenue.  

This was an exciting moment for the GRCOA and its COMPASS coaches, who are trained to consult with seniors and are seniors themselves.    They share a strong passion to give back to the community and are adept at listening to seniors’ stories. They also conduct research for the GRCOA to report back to the community.

Every club or organization geared to seniors is an opportunity for fellowship, socialization, learning and fun.  Opportunities abound.  Seniors can even be found at the Boys and Girls Club, the Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre, the Brantford Public Library and County of Brant libraries.

Seniors looking for other pursuits could choose to serve as educators, mentors, advisers and coaches. The next generations will benefit from their accumulated wisdom and experience.

Living longer is a remarkable accomplishment. However, to capture the full benefits of advanced age, seniors should reflect on two things: the time they’ve been given and what they’re going to do with it. It’s about quality and purpose.

If you think of life as a journey, aging provides jogs in the road with awesome potential.

The golden years can be fabulous. Just imagine the possibilities.