Community welcome to apartheid talks

News Nov 14, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Individuals can make a difference for those experiencing racism.

Yola Grant and Yolisa Dalamba want to show the community how they and others did just that in South Africa.

Two women actively campaigned against South African apartheid and will speak at the People Make History lecture series at Wilfrid Laurier University’s Brantford campus on Nov. 16 and 17.

“Our goal for the lecture series is to showcase history from the perspective of someone who lived through a historic event and to demonstrate how individuals can impact history,” said Tarah Brookfield, Laurier associate professor and organizer of the event. “For this particular lecture, we want to raise awareness about the history of apartheid and the resistance against it in South Africa and Canada.”

On Nov. 16, they will talk about Anti-Apartheid Activism in Canada and South Africa throughout the 1980s and 90s in room RCW002 in the Research and Academic Centre on Dalhousie Street from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

On Nov. 17, they will have breakfast with students from the law and society, human rights and human diversity, social and environmental justice, and education programs to talk about law and education careers. Afterward the community is welcome to hear their reflections on South African apartheid, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Odeon Building in room 200, on Market Street.

Grant was born in Jamaica and is the associate chair and adjudicator at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. She immigrated to Canada in the 1970s and advocated for anti-racism, public education and in the anti-apartheid and feminist movements.

She was co-chair of the Anti-Apartheid Coalition of Toronto and chair of Canadians Concerned about South Africa, advocating for sanctions on South Africa.

After apartheid ended in South Africa, she served as an elections observer in 1994. She has also served on the boards of numerous not-for-profit organizations, including the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund in Canada.

Dalamba was born in South Africa and grew up in the anti-apartheid movement. She has been a grassroots activist-educator for more than 30 years and she has worked in Southern Africa and Canada. During the height of the AIDS crisis in the 1990s, she travelled around Southern Africa educating people about the disease.

The lecture series is free and everyone is welcome.

Community welcome to apartheid talks

Laurier Brantford's lecture series, People Make History, runs Nov. 16 and 17

News Nov 14, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Individuals can make a difference for those experiencing racism.

Yola Grant and Yolisa Dalamba want to show the community how they and others did just that in South Africa.

Two women actively campaigned against South African apartheid and will speak at the People Make History lecture series at Wilfrid Laurier University’s Brantford campus on Nov. 16 and 17.

“Our goal for the lecture series is to showcase history from the perspective of someone who lived through a historic event and to demonstrate how individuals can impact history,” said Tarah Brookfield, Laurier associate professor and organizer of the event. “For this particular lecture, we want to raise awareness about the history of apartheid and the resistance against it in South Africa and Canada.”

On Nov. 16, they will talk about Anti-Apartheid Activism in Canada and South Africa throughout the 1980s and 90s in room RCW002 in the Research and Academic Centre on Dalhousie Street from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

On Nov. 17, they will have breakfast with students from the law and society, human rights and human diversity, social and environmental justice, and education programs to talk about law and education careers. Afterward the community is welcome to hear their reflections on South African apartheid, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Odeon Building in room 200, on Market Street.

Grant was born in Jamaica and is the associate chair and adjudicator at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. She immigrated to Canada in the 1970s and advocated for anti-racism, public education and in the anti-apartheid and feminist movements.

She was co-chair of the Anti-Apartheid Coalition of Toronto and chair of Canadians Concerned about South Africa, advocating for sanctions on South Africa.

After apartheid ended in South Africa, she served as an elections observer in 1994. She has also served on the boards of numerous not-for-profit organizations, including the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund in Canada.

Dalamba was born in South Africa and grew up in the anti-apartheid movement. She has been a grassroots activist-educator for more than 30 years and she has worked in Southern Africa and Canada. During the height of the AIDS crisis in the 1990s, she travelled around Southern Africa educating people about the disease.

The lecture series is free and everyone is welcome.

Community welcome to apartheid talks

Laurier Brantford's lecture series, People Make History, runs Nov. 16 and 17

News Nov 14, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Individuals can make a difference for those experiencing racism.

Yola Grant and Yolisa Dalamba want to show the community how they and others did just that in South Africa.

Two women actively campaigned against South African apartheid and will speak at the People Make History lecture series at Wilfrid Laurier University’s Brantford campus on Nov. 16 and 17.

“Our goal for the lecture series is to showcase history from the perspective of someone who lived through a historic event and to demonstrate how individuals can impact history,” said Tarah Brookfield, Laurier associate professor and organizer of the event. “For this particular lecture, we want to raise awareness about the history of apartheid and the resistance against it in South Africa and Canada.”

On Nov. 16, they will talk about Anti-Apartheid Activism in Canada and South Africa throughout the 1980s and 90s in room RCW002 in the Research and Academic Centre on Dalhousie Street from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

On Nov. 17, they will have breakfast with students from the law and society, human rights and human diversity, social and environmental justice, and education programs to talk about law and education careers. Afterward the community is welcome to hear their reflections on South African apartheid, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Odeon Building in room 200, on Market Street.

Grant was born in Jamaica and is the associate chair and adjudicator at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. She immigrated to Canada in the 1970s and advocated for anti-racism, public education and in the anti-apartheid and feminist movements.

She was co-chair of the Anti-Apartheid Coalition of Toronto and chair of Canadians Concerned about South Africa, advocating for sanctions on South Africa.

After apartheid ended in South Africa, she served as an elections observer in 1994. She has also served on the boards of numerous not-for-profit organizations, including the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund in Canada.

Dalamba was born in South Africa and grew up in the anti-apartheid movement. She has been a grassroots activist-educator for more than 30 years and she has worked in Southern Africa and Canada. During the height of the AIDS crisis in the 1990s, she travelled around Southern Africa educating people about the disease.

The lecture series is free and everyone is welcome.