REMEMBRANCE DAY: Commemorative cenotaph coin collection complete

News Nov 09, 2017 by Sean Allen Brant News

There’s something about a tangible keepsake. 

“It’s something you can put in your hand and show people,” said Robert Johnson, a veteran of the Vietnam War and Thank-A-Vet committee member. “You can say: ‘This is what’s happening in Brant to help promote the memory of our veterans.’” 

With the minting of two final coins featuring images of the cenotaphs throughout the riding of Brant, a keepsake coin series has been completed for all area veterans and their families to commemorate the sacrifices they made — and as a reminder that they didn’t go it alone. 

“We included a monument from each of our communities so that this collection is meaningful to the individual, but they can also reminisce that they fought side by side with others from the area,” said Brant MPP Dave Levac, also a member of the Thank-A-Vet committee. 

In 2015, a single coin featuring the Brant County War Memorial in Brantford was created by the Thank-A-Vet luncheon committee as a keepsake for veterans attending the annual meal in their honour. 

“It was a wildly successful and a sought-after issue,” Levac said. 

Veteran Don Spiece said coins have a particular importance to those in the military. 

“Most regiments carry identification medallions in their pocket,” he said. “So if you say you’ve walked a mile in those shoes, you have the medallion to prove it.” 

With the average age of Canadian Second World War veterans quickly approaching 95, the Thank-A-Vet committee made the decision to fast-track what was originally going to be a six-year, coin-per-year collectors’ series. 

Last year, coins were minted featuring images of the Paris cenotaph, the Six Nations cenotaph and the St. George cenotaph. 

This year, the New Credit cenotaph and Burford cenotaph were added to complete the collection for local veterans.  

No collection would be complete without a proper display case. 

Thank-A-Vet committee member Ed Chrzanowski has been busy handcrafting 550 pine display boxes with preformed foam to fit each of the six coins. 

“I wanted to bring the symbolism of the pine box, which a lot of our soldiers are buried in overseas,” Chrzanowski said. “It’s purposefully not varnished or stained — it’s a plain pine box.” 

The committee estimates that the 550 pine boxes will give them enough complete sets of the coins to ensure that every local veteran or their family gets the collection. 

“The coin sets right now are for veterans only,” Levac said, noting that there has been a lot of interest from the general public in the set. “We are going to work on making sure every veteran gets one of these first. If there are some left over, they may be available for purchase.” 

But Levac said there won’t be any consideration for what to do with any remaining sets until the committee has done its due diligence in tracking down local veterans. 

“If a veteran has passed since we started this, we want the widow or family to come forward and complete the set,” Levac said. 

“The goal should be for a family to have a complete set as a keepsake,” said Robert Lavigne, a committee member who was responsible for designing the coins. 


BRANT REMEMBERS STORIES

   Six Nations veterans recall service in Vietnam War

   Syrian refugees escape civil war to make a new life in Canada

   Great War Centenary Association brings the reality of war closer to home

   Students preserve stories from local veterans

   MP Phil McColeman at home in veterans affairs role

   Luncheon honours veterans

   Finding art in Second World War aircraft

   Hitler Youth conscript calls war ‘demonic'


REMEMBRANCE DAY: Commemorative cenotaph coin collection complete

Thank-A-Vet committee working to ensure every local veteran has keepsake for family

News Nov 09, 2017 by Sean Allen Brant News

There’s something about a tangible keepsake. 

“It’s something you can put in your hand and show people,” said Robert Johnson, a veteran of the Vietnam War and Thank-A-Vet committee member. “You can say: ‘This is what’s happening in Brant to help promote the memory of our veterans.’” 

With the minting of two final coins featuring images of the cenotaphs throughout the riding of Brant, a keepsake coin series has been completed for all area veterans and their families to commemorate the sacrifices they made — and as a reminder that they didn’t go it alone. 

“We included a monument from each of our communities so that this collection is meaningful to the individual, but they can also reminisce that they fought side by side with others from the area,” said Brant MPP Dave Levac, also a member of the Thank-A-Vet committee. 

Related Content

In 2015, a single coin featuring the Brant County War Memorial in Brantford was created by the Thank-A-Vet luncheon committee as a keepsake for veterans attending the annual meal in their honour. 

“It was a wildly successful and a sought-after issue,” Levac said. 

Veteran Don Spiece said coins have a particular importance to those in the military. 

“Most regiments carry identification medallions in their pocket,” he said. “So if you say you’ve walked a mile in those shoes, you have the medallion to prove it.” 

With the average age of Canadian Second World War veterans quickly approaching 95, the Thank-A-Vet committee made the decision to fast-track what was originally going to be a six-year, coin-per-year collectors’ series. 

Last year, coins were minted featuring images of the Paris cenotaph, the Six Nations cenotaph and the St. George cenotaph. 

This year, the New Credit cenotaph and Burford cenotaph were added to complete the collection for local veterans.  

No collection would be complete without a proper display case. 

Thank-A-Vet committee member Ed Chrzanowski has been busy handcrafting 550 pine display boxes with preformed foam to fit each of the six coins. 

“I wanted to bring the symbolism of the pine box, which a lot of our soldiers are buried in overseas,” Chrzanowski said. “It’s purposefully not varnished or stained — it’s a plain pine box.” 

The committee estimates that the 550 pine boxes will give them enough complete sets of the coins to ensure that every local veteran or their family gets the collection. 

“The coin sets right now are for veterans only,” Levac said, noting that there has been a lot of interest from the general public in the set. “We are going to work on making sure every veteran gets one of these first. If there are some left over, they may be available for purchase.” 

But Levac said there won’t be any consideration for what to do with any remaining sets until the committee has done its due diligence in tracking down local veterans. 

“If a veteran has passed since we started this, we want the widow or family to come forward and complete the set,” Levac said. 

“The goal should be for a family to have a complete set as a keepsake,” said Robert Lavigne, a committee member who was responsible for designing the coins. 


BRANT REMEMBERS STORIES

   Six Nations veterans recall service in Vietnam War

   Syrian refugees escape civil war to make a new life in Canada

   Great War Centenary Association brings the reality of war closer to home

   Students preserve stories from local veterans

   MP Phil McColeman at home in veterans affairs role

   Luncheon honours veterans

   Finding art in Second World War aircraft

   Hitler Youth conscript calls war ‘demonic'


REMEMBRANCE DAY: Commemorative cenotaph coin collection complete

Thank-A-Vet committee working to ensure every local veteran has keepsake for family

News Nov 09, 2017 by Sean Allen Brant News

There’s something about a tangible keepsake. 

“It’s something you can put in your hand and show people,” said Robert Johnson, a veteran of the Vietnam War and Thank-A-Vet committee member. “You can say: ‘This is what’s happening in Brant to help promote the memory of our veterans.’” 

With the minting of two final coins featuring images of the cenotaphs throughout the riding of Brant, a keepsake coin series has been completed for all area veterans and their families to commemorate the sacrifices they made — and as a reminder that they didn’t go it alone. 

“We included a monument from each of our communities so that this collection is meaningful to the individual, but they can also reminisce that they fought side by side with others from the area,” said Brant MPP Dave Levac, also a member of the Thank-A-Vet committee. 

Related Content

In 2015, a single coin featuring the Brant County War Memorial in Brantford was created by the Thank-A-Vet luncheon committee as a keepsake for veterans attending the annual meal in their honour. 

“It was a wildly successful and a sought-after issue,” Levac said. 

Veteran Don Spiece said coins have a particular importance to those in the military. 

“Most regiments carry identification medallions in their pocket,” he said. “So if you say you’ve walked a mile in those shoes, you have the medallion to prove it.” 

With the average age of Canadian Second World War veterans quickly approaching 95, the Thank-A-Vet committee made the decision to fast-track what was originally going to be a six-year, coin-per-year collectors’ series. 

Last year, coins were minted featuring images of the Paris cenotaph, the Six Nations cenotaph and the St. George cenotaph. 

This year, the New Credit cenotaph and Burford cenotaph were added to complete the collection for local veterans.  

No collection would be complete without a proper display case. 

Thank-A-Vet committee member Ed Chrzanowski has been busy handcrafting 550 pine display boxes with preformed foam to fit each of the six coins. 

“I wanted to bring the symbolism of the pine box, which a lot of our soldiers are buried in overseas,” Chrzanowski said. “It’s purposefully not varnished or stained — it’s a plain pine box.” 

The committee estimates that the 550 pine boxes will give them enough complete sets of the coins to ensure that every local veteran or their family gets the collection. 

“The coin sets right now are for veterans only,” Levac said, noting that there has been a lot of interest from the general public in the set. “We are going to work on making sure every veteran gets one of these first. If there are some left over, they may be available for purchase.” 

But Levac said there won’t be any consideration for what to do with any remaining sets until the committee has done its due diligence in tracking down local veterans. 

“If a veteran has passed since we started this, we want the widow or family to come forward and complete the set,” Levac said. 

“The goal should be for a family to have a complete set as a keepsake,” said Robert Lavigne, a committee member who was responsible for designing the coins. 


BRANT REMEMBERS STORIES

   Six Nations veterans recall service in Vietnam War

   Syrian refugees escape civil war to make a new life in Canada

   Great War Centenary Association brings the reality of war closer to home

   Students preserve stories from local veterans

   MP Phil McColeman at home in veterans affairs role

   Luncheon honours veterans

   Finding art in Second World War aircraft

   Hitler Youth conscript calls war ‘demonic'