Thank-A-Vet luncheon honours veterans

News Nov 07, 2017 by Shawn Smith Brant News

For 20 years, the Thank-A-Vet luncheon in Brantford has helped honour veterans from throughout Canada’s history. Whether it’s the First World War, Second World War, Korean War, Afghanistan, NATO missions or the Six Nations veterans who fought in Vietnam, the event is a tribute to those who sacrificed and in some cases lost their lives for our freedoms.

More than 450 community members, including many veterans, filled the Assumption College gymnasium on Saturday.

“This is the 20th anniversary; it’s changed locations over that time, the demographics have changed dramatically,” said committee member Robert Lavigne. “It’s a yearlong effort. We literally start as soon as this one is over to plan for next year.”

The event featured a variety of guest speakers, including Brantford Mayor Chris Friel, County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy and Six Nations elected Chief Ava Hill. 

MP Phil McColeman and MPP Dave Levac, who also serves as a committee member for the event, took turns sharing messages of support.

Levac, who helped found the luncheon, is entering his final year of municipal politics. He pledged to stay involved in the event as long as he could, the only pledge of its kind Levac has made for his retirement.

While the Thank-A-Vet luncheon will continue to honour veterans in the coming years, the demographics of the event are growing and evolving.

“What we have obviously seen is a decrease in the veterans, but we have seen an increase in the general public in support,” Lavigne said. “Over the years, as there are less and less veterans, you’re going to see overwhelming support from the community to embrace them while they are still here.”

Lavigne said there are ideas floating around to help the event appeal to the younger veterans, such as those who fought in Afghanistan, who were helping to serve during this year’s event.

“To me, there will always be an opportunity to thank our veterans,” Lavigne said. “How that manifests, whether it’s a stag and doe for Afghanistan veterans because they’re younger, or an evolution of this luncheon to be more for the general public, those are the questions we’ll have over the next years.”


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REMEMBRANCE DAY: Thank-A-Vet luncheon honours veterans

Twenty years later, event continues to grow and evolve

News Nov 07, 2017 by Shawn Smith Brant News

For 20 years, the Thank-A-Vet luncheon in Brantford has helped honour veterans from throughout Canada’s history. Whether it’s the First World War, Second World War, Korean War, Afghanistan, NATO missions or the Six Nations veterans who fought in Vietnam, the event is a tribute to those who sacrificed and in some cases lost their lives for our freedoms.

More than 450 community members, including many veterans, filled the Assumption College gymnasium on Saturday.

“This is the 20th anniversary; it’s changed locations over that time, the demographics have changed dramatically,” said committee member Robert Lavigne. “It’s a yearlong effort. We literally start as soon as this one is over to plan for next year.”

The event featured a variety of guest speakers, including Brantford Mayor Chris Friel, County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy and Six Nations elected Chief Ava Hill. 

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MP Phil McColeman and MPP Dave Levac, who also serves as a committee member for the event, took turns sharing messages of support.

Levac, who helped found the luncheon, is entering his final year of municipal politics. He pledged to stay involved in the event as long as he could, the only pledge of its kind Levac has made for his retirement.

While the Thank-A-Vet luncheon will continue to honour veterans in the coming years, the demographics of the event are growing and evolving.

“What we have obviously seen is a decrease in the veterans, but we have seen an increase in the general public in support,” Lavigne said. “Over the years, as there are less and less veterans, you’re going to see overwhelming support from the community to embrace them while they are still here.”

Lavigne said there are ideas floating around to help the event appeal to the younger veterans, such as those who fought in Afghanistan, who were helping to serve during this year’s event.

“To me, there will always be an opportunity to thank our veterans,” Lavigne said. “How that manifests, whether it’s a stag and doe for Afghanistan veterans because they’re younger, or an evolution of this luncheon to be more for the general public, those are the questions we’ll have over the next years.”

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Thank-A-Vet luncheon honours veterans

Twenty years later, event continues to grow and evolve

News Nov 07, 2017 by Shawn Smith Brant News

For 20 years, the Thank-A-Vet luncheon in Brantford has helped honour veterans from throughout Canada’s history. Whether it’s the First World War, Second World War, Korean War, Afghanistan, NATO missions or the Six Nations veterans who fought in Vietnam, the event is a tribute to those who sacrificed and in some cases lost their lives for our freedoms.

More than 450 community members, including many veterans, filled the Assumption College gymnasium on Saturday.

“This is the 20th anniversary; it’s changed locations over that time, the demographics have changed dramatically,” said committee member Robert Lavigne. “It’s a yearlong effort. We literally start as soon as this one is over to plan for next year.”

The event featured a variety of guest speakers, including Brantford Mayor Chris Friel, County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy and Six Nations elected Chief Ava Hill. 

Related Content

MP Phil McColeman and MPP Dave Levac, who also serves as a committee member for the event, took turns sharing messages of support.

Levac, who helped found the luncheon, is entering his final year of municipal politics. He pledged to stay involved in the event as long as he could, the only pledge of its kind Levac has made for his retirement.

While the Thank-A-Vet luncheon will continue to honour veterans in the coming years, the demographics of the event are growing and evolving.

“What we have obviously seen is a decrease in the veterans, but we have seen an increase in the general public in support,” Lavigne said. “Over the years, as there are less and less veterans, you’re going to see overwhelming support from the community to embrace them while they are still here.”

Lavigne said there are ideas floating around to help the event appeal to the younger veterans, such as those who fought in Afghanistan, who were helping to serve during this year’s event.

“To me, there will always be an opportunity to thank our veterans,” Lavigne said. “How that manifests, whether it’s a stag and doe for Afghanistan veterans because they’re younger, or an evolution of this luncheon to be more for the general public, those are the questions we’ll have over the next years.”