Skilled trades workers are reaching out to students

News Oct 12, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Jobs in the skilled trades are evolving with technology and offer something for everyone.

“There is a huge range of opportunities and not all of them are dirty and labour intensive,” Mark Vicano, from Vicano Construction LTD. said. “There's a huge demand for skilled labour and it pays well. There's no ceiling.”

Vicano hosted Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program's Opportunity Day with students from both the Grand Erie District School Board and the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board on Wednesday at the construction site of Brantford's senior's residence on Mt Pleasant Street to talk about how many different trades are involved in one project.

Students like, Justin Rcarr, from St. John's College, were given the opportunity to learn about the many different and evolving trades involved in the process and how those trades are evolving before a tour of the 57-unit, four-storey building.

Rcarr doesn't know exactly what career path he wants to take, but he knows he likes using his hands.

“I'm enjoying my construction class and it's something to look into,” he said.

Vicano told students that as the world leans toward lowering emissions, tradesmen have evolved to fulfil that need with things like geothermal heating and cooling. That need has opened the door for expansion and need for drilling rig operators, mechanics, HVAC specialists and more.

Holes were drilled 450 feet into the ground around the building and pipes were inserted and connected to run therminol through the pipes in the earth to collect its warmth and bring it back into the building (reversed for cooling), creating a low emission, very low cost heating and cooling system.

“When I was in high school teachers a counsellors focused on college and university, not that that is a bad way to go, but there is no more out there. As the industries expand there is more and more need for skilled workers who can do things like this,” he said.

Carmine Romano, OYAP co-ordinator for the BHNCDSB, said the experience helps broaden student's outlook and gives them career options beyond the norm.

“This is the first time we've partnered with Vicano this way,” he said. “The students are getting the opportunity to see a construction project and get an idea of what it takes from start to finish. Let them see their options.”

Vicano pointed out that there are many people involved in building one structure from project managers, consultants, engineers and architects to masons, drywall fitter, electricians, carpenters, elevator technicians and much more.

“There's a lot of teamwork. It's something you can take pride in. You can drive through the city, the province and see things you've built that will be there for years to come. It's very gratifying, for me and I didn't actually build anything,” Vicano said.

Rcarr said he was glad to be given the opportunity to see the site.

“I've gotten some good information and it's been fun; something to think about, for sure,” he said.

Skilled trades workers are reaching out to students

The trades are evolving and offer lucrative, rewarding careers in many areas

News Oct 12, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Jobs in the skilled trades are evolving with technology and offer something for everyone.

“There is a huge range of opportunities and not all of them are dirty and labour intensive,” Mark Vicano, from Vicano Construction LTD. said. “There's a huge demand for skilled labour and it pays well. There's no ceiling.”

Vicano hosted Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program's Opportunity Day with students from both the Grand Erie District School Board and the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board on Wednesday at the construction site of Brantford's senior's residence on Mt Pleasant Street to talk about how many different trades are involved in one project.

Students like, Justin Rcarr, from St. John's College, were given the opportunity to learn about the many different and evolving trades involved in the process and how those trades are evolving before a tour of the 57-unit, four-storey building.

Rcarr doesn't know exactly what career path he wants to take, but he knows he likes using his hands.

“I'm enjoying my construction class and it's something to look into,” he said.

Vicano told students that as the world leans toward lowering emissions, tradesmen have evolved to fulfil that need with things like geothermal heating and cooling. That need has opened the door for expansion and need for drilling rig operators, mechanics, HVAC specialists and more.

Holes were drilled 450 feet into the ground around the building and pipes were inserted and connected to run therminol through the pipes in the earth to collect its warmth and bring it back into the building (reversed for cooling), creating a low emission, very low cost heating and cooling system.

“When I was in high school teachers a counsellors focused on college and university, not that that is a bad way to go, but there is no more out there. As the industries expand there is more and more need for skilled workers who can do things like this,” he said.

Carmine Romano, OYAP co-ordinator for the BHNCDSB, said the experience helps broaden student's outlook and gives them career options beyond the norm.

“This is the first time we've partnered with Vicano this way,” he said. “The students are getting the opportunity to see a construction project and get an idea of what it takes from start to finish. Let them see their options.”

Vicano pointed out that there are many people involved in building one structure from project managers, consultants, engineers and architects to masons, drywall fitter, electricians, carpenters, elevator technicians and much more.

“There's a lot of teamwork. It's something you can take pride in. You can drive through the city, the province and see things you've built that will be there for years to come. It's very gratifying, for me and I didn't actually build anything,” Vicano said.

Rcarr said he was glad to be given the opportunity to see the site.

“I've gotten some good information and it's been fun; something to think about, for sure,” he said.

Skilled trades workers are reaching out to students

The trades are evolving and offer lucrative, rewarding careers in many areas

News Oct 12, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Jobs in the skilled trades are evolving with technology and offer something for everyone.

“There is a huge range of opportunities and not all of them are dirty and labour intensive,” Mark Vicano, from Vicano Construction LTD. said. “There's a huge demand for skilled labour and it pays well. There's no ceiling.”

Vicano hosted Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program's Opportunity Day with students from both the Grand Erie District School Board and the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board on Wednesday at the construction site of Brantford's senior's residence on Mt Pleasant Street to talk about how many different trades are involved in one project.

Students like, Justin Rcarr, from St. John's College, were given the opportunity to learn about the many different and evolving trades involved in the process and how those trades are evolving before a tour of the 57-unit, four-storey building.

Rcarr doesn't know exactly what career path he wants to take, but he knows he likes using his hands.

“I'm enjoying my construction class and it's something to look into,” he said.

Vicano told students that as the world leans toward lowering emissions, tradesmen have evolved to fulfil that need with things like geothermal heating and cooling. That need has opened the door for expansion and need for drilling rig operators, mechanics, HVAC specialists and more.

Holes were drilled 450 feet into the ground around the building and pipes were inserted and connected to run therminol through the pipes in the earth to collect its warmth and bring it back into the building (reversed for cooling), creating a low emission, very low cost heating and cooling system.

“When I was in high school teachers a counsellors focused on college and university, not that that is a bad way to go, but there is no more out there. As the industries expand there is more and more need for skilled workers who can do things like this,” he said.

Carmine Romano, OYAP co-ordinator for the BHNCDSB, said the experience helps broaden student's outlook and gives them career options beyond the norm.

“This is the first time we've partnered with Vicano this way,” he said. “The students are getting the opportunity to see a construction project and get an idea of what it takes from start to finish. Let them see their options.”

Vicano pointed out that there are many people involved in building one structure from project managers, consultants, engineers and architects to masons, drywall fitter, electricians, carpenters, elevator technicians and much more.

“There's a lot of teamwork. It's something you can take pride in. You can drive through the city, the province and see things you've built that will be there for years to come. It's very gratifying, for me and I didn't actually build anything,” Vicano said.

Rcarr said he was glad to be given the opportunity to see the site.

“I've gotten some good information and it's been fun; something to think about, for sure,” he said.