Talking about depression is the first step to healing

News Sep 20, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Talk about depression, talk about suicide, and give people hope for a future.

It may save their life.

“The resounding message I have heard loud and clear is that people want a sense of belonging, to be respected, to be heard, and to be offered help and given hope that healing is possible,” Sarah Precious, suicide prevention co-ordinator, said.

The Suicide Prevention Committee held its second annual Meet Me at the Flag event in support of World Suicide Awareness Day on Wednesday at city hall, where they raised a flag and held a moment of silence for those struggling with mental illness and depression and those who have been lost to suicide.

Precious said they hope to make a more understanding and compassionate community to create a more suicide-safe Brantford.

“By being here today, you are taking a stand to reduce stigma and to shine a light on this important issue, to send a message to those who are experiencing despair, who are grieving, and who are supporting someone else who is struggling,” she said.

Mark Imgrund, a grade eight teacher at Central School, brought his class to the flag-raising to show them that it's OK not to be OK.

“I want to open up the lines of communication and hopefully keep them open for years to come. I want them to know that if they need to talk, I'm open to talking about it,” he said.

Precious said that suicide is the second leading cause of death for those aged 10 to 24.

“(This) is an opportunity to spread the message that help, hope, and healing are possible. But today is just the beginning. This topic needs attention not only today, but every day. Please consider how you can help create a suicide-safer Brant by taking a minute to make a difference in someone's life, and in Brant, today,” Precious said.

Acting mayor Richard Carpenter said everyone has bad days and everyone has experienced depression and people should talk about it because that's one way to work through it.

“I challenge all of you: when you're looking in the mirror in the morning, brushing your teeth or hair, to say one nice thing about yourself everyday,” he said.

For more information about services available, please visit www.contactbrant.net.

Talking about depression is the first step to healing

Raising awareness for suicide prevention in Brantford

News Sep 20, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Talk about depression, talk about suicide, and give people hope for a future.

It may save their life.

“The resounding message I have heard loud and clear is that people want a sense of belonging, to be respected, to be heard, and to be offered help and given hope that healing is possible,” Sarah Precious, suicide prevention co-ordinator, said.

The Suicide Prevention Committee held its second annual Meet Me at the Flag event in support of World Suicide Awareness Day on Wednesday at city hall, where they raised a flag and held a moment of silence for those struggling with mental illness and depression and those who have been lost to suicide.

Precious said they hope to make a more understanding and compassionate community to create a more suicide-safe Brantford.

“By being here today, you are taking a stand to reduce stigma and to shine a light on this important issue, to send a message to those who are experiencing despair, who are grieving, and who are supporting someone else who is struggling,” she said.

Mark Imgrund, a grade eight teacher at Central School, brought his class to the flag-raising to show them that it's OK not to be OK.

“I want to open up the lines of communication and hopefully keep them open for years to come. I want them to know that if they need to talk, I'm open to talking about it,” he said.

Precious said that suicide is the second leading cause of death for those aged 10 to 24.

“(This) is an opportunity to spread the message that help, hope, and healing are possible. But today is just the beginning. This topic needs attention not only today, but every day. Please consider how you can help create a suicide-safer Brant by taking a minute to make a difference in someone's life, and in Brant, today,” Precious said.

Acting mayor Richard Carpenter said everyone has bad days and everyone has experienced depression and people should talk about it because that's one way to work through it.

“I challenge all of you: when you're looking in the mirror in the morning, brushing your teeth or hair, to say one nice thing about yourself everyday,” he said.

For more information about services available, please visit www.contactbrant.net.

Talking about depression is the first step to healing

Raising awareness for suicide prevention in Brantford

News Sep 20, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

Talk about depression, talk about suicide, and give people hope for a future.

It may save their life.

“The resounding message I have heard loud and clear is that people want a sense of belonging, to be respected, to be heard, and to be offered help and given hope that healing is possible,” Sarah Precious, suicide prevention co-ordinator, said.

The Suicide Prevention Committee held its second annual Meet Me at the Flag event in support of World Suicide Awareness Day on Wednesday at city hall, where they raised a flag and held a moment of silence for those struggling with mental illness and depression and those who have been lost to suicide.

Precious said they hope to make a more understanding and compassionate community to create a more suicide-safe Brantford.

“By being here today, you are taking a stand to reduce stigma and to shine a light on this important issue, to send a message to those who are experiencing despair, who are grieving, and who are supporting someone else who is struggling,” she said.

Mark Imgrund, a grade eight teacher at Central School, brought his class to the flag-raising to show them that it's OK not to be OK.

“I want to open up the lines of communication and hopefully keep them open for years to come. I want them to know that if they need to talk, I'm open to talking about it,” he said.

Precious said that suicide is the second leading cause of death for those aged 10 to 24.

“(This) is an opportunity to spread the message that help, hope, and healing are possible. But today is just the beginning. This topic needs attention not only today, but every day. Please consider how you can help create a suicide-safer Brant by taking a minute to make a difference in someone's life, and in Brant, today,” Precious said.

Acting mayor Richard Carpenter said everyone has bad days and everyone has experienced depression and people should talk about it because that's one way to work through it.

“I challenge all of you: when you're looking in the mirror in the morning, brushing your teeth or hair, to say one nice thing about yourself everyday,” he said.

For more information about services available, please visit www.contactbrant.net.