BCHS community recruitment program receives continued support from the city

News Mar 22, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

The Brant Community Heathcare System will continue it’s recruitment program with the support of the city.

At Tuesday’s committee meeting, Brantford city council voted to give BCHS $110,000 – as it’s done since 2008 – to help recruit doctors and nurses to the area.

Jim Hornell, BCHS president and CEO, said that the program helped bring seven new doctors to the area last year and thinks it has attracted three or four a year since the program started.

“On any given year people retire,” he said. “There are five doctors who are accepting patients right now, but there are more retirements coming.”

The BCHS matches the city’s contribution and the program offers $20,000 in bursaries to local students in the hopes that they locate here after their studies.

Hornell said the BCHS has a lot of financial and spacial challenges, which is not uncommon for community hospitals, but they have done a lot of work to ensure their success.

In November, BCHS was projecting a $6-million deficit, but Hornell said they’ve gotten that deficit under $3 million.

“We’ve made a lot of changes and we’re starting to see some results that will carry over into the next year,” he said.

Hornell said changes to ambulance care were also a factor when it came to bringing the budget down and those changes are scheduled to come into effect in April.

He said they are also planning to revamp and expand the emergency wing, which was designed to care for 20,000 people a year and now sees more then 60,000.

“I can confidently say, when you have an emergency in this city, you will be well taken care of,” he said. “Part of our problem is that there are other issues in a large community. People come to the hospital when they really need other types of care. Right now, the challenges in the community are mental health patients (and) people with addictions, who frequently show up at emergency because they have no place else to go.”

Unlike BCHS, Hornell said many hospitals don’t provide non-urgent care services because they aren’t compensated by the province for things like follow-up appointments, bandage changes or injections.

He also said Brantford General Hospital has 262 beds and is usually operating anywhere from five to 15 per cent over capacity.

Last month, the province appointed an investigator to review the hospital’s operations after the chief of medical staff wrote a letter to the province outlining employee relations problems. Hornell said he welcomes the investigation.

“I hope (the investigation) validates good practices and gives us ways to improve,” he said. “All our reports have been made public and we shared that publicly.

“The work of our hospital continues. Patients are coming, they are being cared for and changes are implemented on daily basis.”

 

BCHS community recruitment program receives continued support from the city

News Mar 22, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

The Brant Community Heathcare System will continue it’s recruitment program with the support of the city.

At Tuesday’s committee meeting, Brantford city council voted to give BCHS $110,000 – as it’s done since 2008 – to help recruit doctors and nurses to the area.

Jim Hornell, BCHS president and CEO, said that the program helped bring seven new doctors to the area last year and thinks it has attracted three or four a year since the program started.

“On any given year people retire,” he said. “There are five doctors who are accepting patients right now, but there are more retirements coming.”

The BCHS matches the city’s contribution and the program offers $20,000 in bursaries to local students in the hopes that they locate here after their studies.

Hornell said the BCHS has a lot of financial and spacial challenges, which is not uncommon for community hospitals, but they have done a lot of work to ensure their success.

In November, BCHS was projecting a $6-million deficit, but Hornell said they’ve gotten that deficit under $3 million.

“We’ve made a lot of changes and we’re starting to see some results that will carry over into the next year,” he said.

Hornell said changes to ambulance care were also a factor when it came to bringing the budget down and those changes are scheduled to come into effect in April.

He said they are also planning to revamp and expand the emergency wing, which was designed to care for 20,000 people a year and now sees more then 60,000.

“I can confidently say, when you have an emergency in this city, you will be well taken care of,” he said. “Part of our problem is that there are other issues in a large community. People come to the hospital when they really need other types of care. Right now, the challenges in the community are mental health patients (and) people with addictions, who frequently show up at emergency because they have no place else to go.”

Unlike BCHS, Hornell said many hospitals don’t provide non-urgent care services because they aren’t compensated by the province for things like follow-up appointments, bandage changes or injections.

He also said Brantford General Hospital has 262 beds and is usually operating anywhere from five to 15 per cent over capacity.

Last month, the province appointed an investigator to review the hospital’s operations after the chief of medical staff wrote a letter to the province outlining employee relations problems. Hornell said he welcomes the investigation.

“I hope (the investigation) validates good practices and gives us ways to improve,” he said. “All our reports have been made public and we shared that publicly.

“The work of our hospital continues. Patients are coming, they are being cared for and changes are implemented on daily basis.”

 

BCHS community recruitment program receives continued support from the city

News Mar 22, 2017 by Victoria Gray Brant News

The Brant Community Heathcare System will continue it’s recruitment program with the support of the city.

At Tuesday’s committee meeting, Brantford city council voted to give BCHS $110,000 – as it’s done since 2008 – to help recruit doctors and nurses to the area.

Jim Hornell, BCHS president and CEO, said that the program helped bring seven new doctors to the area last year and thinks it has attracted three or four a year since the program started.

“On any given year people retire,” he said. “There are five doctors who are accepting patients right now, but there are more retirements coming.”

The BCHS matches the city’s contribution and the program offers $20,000 in bursaries to local students in the hopes that they locate here after their studies.

Hornell said the BCHS has a lot of financial and spacial challenges, which is not uncommon for community hospitals, but they have done a lot of work to ensure their success.

In November, BCHS was projecting a $6-million deficit, but Hornell said they’ve gotten that deficit under $3 million.

“We’ve made a lot of changes and we’re starting to see some results that will carry over into the next year,” he said.

Hornell said changes to ambulance care were also a factor when it came to bringing the budget down and those changes are scheduled to come into effect in April.

He said they are also planning to revamp and expand the emergency wing, which was designed to care for 20,000 people a year and now sees more then 60,000.

“I can confidently say, when you have an emergency in this city, you will be well taken care of,” he said. “Part of our problem is that there are other issues in a large community. People come to the hospital when they really need other types of care. Right now, the challenges in the community are mental health patients (and) people with addictions, who frequently show up at emergency because they have no place else to go.”

Unlike BCHS, Hornell said many hospitals don’t provide non-urgent care services because they aren’t compensated by the province for things like follow-up appointments, bandage changes or injections.

He also said Brantford General Hospital has 262 beds and is usually operating anywhere from five to 15 per cent over capacity.

Last month, the province appointed an investigator to review the hospital’s operations after the chief of medical staff wrote a letter to the province outlining employee relations problems. Hornell said he welcomes the investigation.

“I hope (the investigation) validates good practices and gives us ways to improve,” he said. “All our reports have been made public and we shared that publicly.

“The work of our hospital continues. Patients are coming, they are being cared for and changes are implemented on daily basis.”