Bowling on the green carpet

News Feb 16, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

In its heyday in the mid 1980s the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club was an admirable force.

With upwards of 30 bowlers who competed in carpet bowling tournaments and championships, the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club made its mark in the carpet bowling world, as evidenced by a trophy won by the club and a medal won by founding member Don Sims at the Ontario Games.

The trophy — along with Sims’ medal — is lovingly honoured in a wood and glass case. Members are quick to bring it out and tell Sims’ story whenever a newcomer drops by to see what carpet bowling is all about.

“He bowled right up until his last days,” score recorder Al Robinson said. “Even though he lost his sight he could still bowl better than some of us who could see what we were doing.”

Sims passed away about four years ago but his love of carpet bowling lives on in the seven original members who continue to bowl every Tuesday night at St. James Anglican Church in Brantford.

Much like lawn bowling — albeit with slightly different rules — carpet bowling is a fun social event that Glenwood members enjoy. They would like to see more people pick up the game so they can remain viable.

“We now have two carpets, which can accommodate 32 bowlers, but we are down to about six or eight people that still come regularly,” Robinson said. “We are desperately looking for new members or we may have to close up.”

Although the remaining members are all seniors, carpet bowling is open to anyone over the age of 16. Unlike pin bowling it is a quiet sport that involves very little exertion.

“With carpet bowling there is no running or major exercise involved as you just stand, bend over, or kneel and let the ball roll off your hand,” Robinson said. “We have members that have had heart attacks and they enjoy it because it gets them out of the house for a few hours in the evening.”

As they progressed over the years Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club members tweaked rules here and there to accommodate the dwindling membership. Bowlers draw tokens every Tuesday to form two teams — nobody knows which team they will be on until the tokens are drawn.

“That way it works evenly because you never know who’s got the good bowlers and who’s got the bad ones,” Robinson joked.

Scorekeeping was also slightly altered to keep the game in play if the white marker ball — the Jack — is knocked off the carpet. Two games of 10 ends are played each night with coffee, tea and cookies enjoyed at halftime.

Carpet bowling is ideal for lawn bowlers that are stuck indoors over the winter months and is also a good sport for people with limited mobility — as long as they have some arm and hand strength.

Ask any member why they continue to come out and the answer is always the same: “It’s a fun night out.”

“Where else,” asked Bert Cutler, “can you go and get a coffee or a tea and a cookie for only $2? What more could you want?”

Robinson agreed.

“I don’t care if I win or lose, we just have fun,” he said.

Sean Ellerker comes all the way from Cayuga to bowl.

“It’s a nice night out and it costs you nothing,” he said.

Each person’s $2 fee is put into the kitty to pay for the refreshments.

Second vice president Stan Plumstead and Alex Balicki drive in from Paris to bowl each week, and other members drive in from Caledonia.

Balicki is a stroke survivor and although he had to switch arms, he still enjoys carpet bowling.

“Now I bowl with my left hand all the time and it works for me,” he said. “And once in a while you get a good game.”

Carpet bowling is relatively easy to learn — people just need to know not to throw the ball, which is levelled on a bias, too hard.

“You can be the best bowler going but you’re going to have an off day,” Cutler said. “You know as soon as you let go of the ball if you’re a little too heavy, but it’s fun.”

John Dzsudzsak in one of the original Glenwood Carpet Bowling members.

“That’s our cup,” he said proudly of the encased trophy. “We beat Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk. We bowled for nine hours.”

People are invited to come out to watch and try carpet bowling on a Tuesday night beginning at 7 p.m. The first night is free.

St. James Anglican Church is located at the corner of Grand and Dublin Streets. For more information call Robinson on 519-752-4414 or Cutler on 519-756-1683.

“It keeps us off the chesterfield and it makes my wife happy because it gets me out of the house,” Cutler said. 

Bowling on the green carpet

Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club enjoy camaraderie and sport

News Feb 16, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

In its heyday in the mid 1980s the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club was an admirable force.

With upwards of 30 bowlers who competed in carpet bowling tournaments and championships, the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club made its mark in the carpet bowling world, as evidenced by a trophy won by the club and a medal won by founding member Don Sims at the Ontario Games.

The trophy — along with Sims’ medal — is lovingly honoured in a wood and glass case. Members are quick to bring it out and tell Sims’ story whenever a newcomer drops by to see what carpet bowling is all about.

“He bowled right up until his last days,” score recorder Al Robinson said. “Even though he lost his sight he could still bowl better than some of us who could see what we were doing.”

Sims passed away about four years ago but his love of carpet bowling lives on in the seven original members who continue to bowl every Tuesday night at St. James Anglican Church in Brantford.

Much like lawn bowling — albeit with slightly different rules — carpet bowling is a fun social event that Glenwood members enjoy. They would like to see more people pick up the game so they can remain viable.

“We now have two carpets, which can accommodate 32 bowlers, but we are down to about six or eight people that still come regularly,” Robinson said. “We are desperately looking for new members or we may have to close up.”

Although the remaining members are all seniors, carpet bowling is open to anyone over the age of 16. Unlike pin bowling it is a quiet sport that involves very little exertion.

“With carpet bowling there is no running or major exercise involved as you just stand, bend over, or kneel and let the ball roll off your hand,” Robinson said. “We have members that have had heart attacks and they enjoy it because it gets them out of the house for a few hours in the evening.”

As they progressed over the years Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club members tweaked rules here and there to accommodate the dwindling membership. Bowlers draw tokens every Tuesday to form two teams — nobody knows which team they will be on until the tokens are drawn.

“That way it works evenly because you never know who’s got the good bowlers and who’s got the bad ones,” Robinson joked.

Scorekeeping was also slightly altered to keep the game in play if the white marker ball — the Jack — is knocked off the carpet. Two games of 10 ends are played each night with coffee, tea and cookies enjoyed at halftime.

Carpet bowling is ideal for lawn bowlers that are stuck indoors over the winter months and is also a good sport for people with limited mobility — as long as they have some arm and hand strength.

Ask any member why they continue to come out and the answer is always the same: “It’s a fun night out.”

“Where else,” asked Bert Cutler, “can you go and get a coffee or a tea and a cookie for only $2? What more could you want?”

Robinson agreed.

“I don’t care if I win or lose, we just have fun,” he said.

Sean Ellerker comes all the way from Cayuga to bowl.

“It’s a nice night out and it costs you nothing,” he said.

Each person’s $2 fee is put into the kitty to pay for the refreshments.

Second vice president Stan Plumstead and Alex Balicki drive in from Paris to bowl each week, and other members drive in from Caledonia.

Balicki is a stroke survivor and although he had to switch arms, he still enjoys carpet bowling.

“Now I bowl with my left hand all the time and it works for me,” he said. “And once in a while you get a good game.”

Carpet bowling is relatively easy to learn — people just need to know not to throw the ball, which is levelled on a bias, too hard.

“You can be the best bowler going but you’re going to have an off day,” Cutler said. “You know as soon as you let go of the ball if you’re a little too heavy, but it’s fun.”

John Dzsudzsak in one of the original Glenwood Carpet Bowling members.

“That’s our cup,” he said proudly of the encased trophy. “We beat Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk. We bowled for nine hours.”

People are invited to come out to watch and try carpet bowling on a Tuesday night beginning at 7 p.m. The first night is free.

St. James Anglican Church is located at the corner of Grand and Dublin Streets. For more information call Robinson on 519-752-4414 or Cutler on 519-756-1683.

“It keeps us off the chesterfield and it makes my wife happy because it gets me out of the house,” Cutler said. 

Bowling on the green carpet

Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club enjoy camaraderie and sport

News Feb 16, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

In its heyday in the mid 1980s the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club was an admirable force.

With upwards of 30 bowlers who competed in carpet bowling tournaments and championships, the Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club made its mark in the carpet bowling world, as evidenced by a trophy won by the club and a medal won by founding member Don Sims at the Ontario Games.

The trophy — along with Sims’ medal — is lovingly honoured in a wood and glass case. Members are quick to bring it out and tell Sims’ story whenever a newcomer drops by to see what carpet bowling is all about.

“He bowled right up until his last days,” score recorder Al Robinson said. “Even though he lost his sight he could still bowl better than some of us who could see what we were doing.”

Sims passed away about four years ago but his love of carpet bowling lives on in the seven original members who continue to bowl every Tuesday night at St. James Anglican Church in Brantford.

Much like lawn bowling — albeit with slightly different rules — carpet bowling is a fun social event that Glenwood members enjoy. They would like to see more people pick up the game so they can remain viable.

“We now have two carpets, which can accommodate 32 bowlers, but we are down to about six or eight people that still come regularly,” Robinson said. “We are desperately looking for new members or we may have to close up.”

Although the remaining members are all seniors, carpet bowling is open to anyone over the age of 16. Unlike pin bowling it is a quiet sport that involves very little exertion.

“With carpet bowling there is no running or major exercise involved as you just stand, bend over, or kneel and let the ball roll off your hand,” Robinson said. “We have members that have had heart attacks and they enjoy it because it gets them out of the house for a few hours in the evening.”

As they progressed over the years Glenwood Carpet Bowling Club members tweaked rules here and there to accommodate the dwindling membership. Bowlers draw tokens every Tuesday to form two teams — nobody knows which team they will be on until the tokens are drawn.

“That way it works evenly because you never know who’s got the good bowlers and who’s got the bad ones,” Robinson joked.

Scorekeeping was also slightly altered to keep the game in play if the white marker ball — the Jack — is knocked off the carpet. Two games of 10 ends are played each night with coffee, tea and cookies enjoyed at halftime.

Carpet bowling is ideal for lawn bowlers that are stuck indoors over the winter months and is also a good sport for people with limited mobility — as long as they have some arm and hand strength.

Ask any member why they continue to come out and the answer is always the same: “It’s a fun night out.”

“Where else,” asked Bert Cutler, “can you go and get a coffee or a tea and a cookie for only $2? What more could you want?”

Robinson agreed.

“I don’t care if I win or lose, we just have fun,” he said.

Sean Ellerker comes all the way from Cayuga to bowl.

“It’s a nice night out and it costs you nothing,” he said.

Each person’s $2 fee is put into the kitty to pay for the refreshments.

Second vice president Stan Plumstead and Alex Balicki drive in from Paris to bowl each week, and other members drive in from Caledonia.

Balicki is a stroke survivor and although he had to switch arms, he still enjoys carpet bowling.

“Now I bowl with my left hand all the time and it works for me,” he said. “And once in a while you get a good game.”

Carpet bowling is relatively easy to learn — people just need to know not to throw the ball, which is levelled on a bias, too hard.

“You can be the best bowler going but you’re going to have an off day,” Cutler said. “You know as soon as you let go of the ball if you’re a little too heavy, but it’s fun.”

John Dzsudzsak in one of the original Glenwood Carpet Bowling members.

“That’s our cup,” he said proudly of the encased trophy. “We beat Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk. We bowled for nine hours.”

People are invited to come out to watch and try carpet bowling on a Tuesday night beginning at 7 p.m. The first night is free.

St. James Anglican Church is located at the corner of Grand and Dublin Streets. For more information call Robinson on 519-752-4414 or Cutler on 519-756-1683.

“It keeps us off the chesterfield and it makes my wife happy because it gets me out of the house,” Cutler said.