Flying high while sitting still

News Oct 18, 2016 by Victoria Gray Brant News

When Ben Davis puts on his goggles he can fly like a fighter pilot.

“I can do things with the drone people only dream of, but there is no danger,” he said.

David flew from Newfoundland to fly his drone in the 2016 FPV Fall Classic Drone Race at the Paris Fair Grounds on Saturday and Sunday.

“I usually try to get out to a few races a year,” he said. “This race is really good quality.”

More than 30 racers came to fly their drones at the race director and announced by Joe Scully who said there are usually about 100 pilots, but many of them were at the Official World Drone Racing Championship in Hawaii.

“This is a really big deal for a lot of guys,” he said. “It's a growing sport and they'll come from all over to race other guys.”

The 1,275 foot course forced pilots to have their three to 12 inch drones fly through obstacles, bridges and more for three laps. Those with the best time on Saturday advanced to the championship on Sunday.

Scully said it's a growing sport and he travels all around the world to commentate races with more than 200 pilots.

“I think as soon as this gets to television it will be huge,” he said.

He has run races in Ontario since 2014, but, this is the first time the Fall Classic was held in Paris, but he thinks the race may have found a permanent home.

“This is a perfect location for us,” he said. “It's nice and open, no obstructions and there is an inside space for us in case it rains.”

Paris Junction Hobbies sponsored the race and set up an emergency mechanical station where pilots who crashed could have a place to go to get the parts and support they needed to get back into the air quickly.

Brandon McLaughlin, technical sales for the local hobby shop said it was their first sponsorship of a race and they planned to do it again and expand their product line for FPV drones and many other similar sports.

“It was definitely a great experience. I got to meet customers from all over the province and outside the province,” he said. “It is an up and coming sporting event and to be able to be part of that growth is definitely something we want to do.”

Jerome Demers, drove eight hours from Quebec to participate in the race, but he really enjoys another aspect of the sport- he likes to build his own drones and tinker with their frames and mechanics.

“I've always been interested in robotics and the mechanical aspect of the sport is interesting,” he said. “It's also the challenge. You know you can always get better and you always know you didn't do something right, you are always trying to get better and go further.”

Flying high while sitting still

News Oct 18, 2016 by Victoria Gray Brant News

When Ben Davis puts on his goggles he can fly like a fighter pilot.

“I can do things with the drone people only dream of, but there is no danger,” he said.

David flew from Newfoundland to fly his drone in the 2016 FPV Fall Classic Drone Race at the Paris Fair Grounds on Saturday and Sunday.

“I usually try to get out to a few races a year,” he said. “This race is really good quality.”

More than 30 racers came to fly their drones at the race director and announced by Joe Scully who said there are usually about 100 pilots, but many of them were at the Official World Drone Racing Championship in Hawaii.

“This is a really big deal for a lot of guys,” he said. “It's a growing sport and they'll come from all over to race other guys.”

The 1,275 foot course forced pilots to have their three to 12 inch drones fly through obstacles, bridges and more for three laps. Those with the best time on Saturday advanced to the championship on Sunday.

Scully said it's a growing sport and he travels all around the world to commentate races with more than 200 pilots.

“I think as soon as this gets to television it will be huge,” he said.

He has run races in Ontario since 2014, but, this is the first time the Fall Classic was held in Paris, but he thinks the race may have found a permanent home.

“This is a perfect location for us,” he said. “It's nice and open, no obstructions and there is an inside space for us in case it rains.”

Paris Junction Hobbies sponsored the race and set up an emergency mechanical station where pilots who crashed could have a place to go to get the parts and support they needed to get back into the air quickly.

Brandon McLaughlin, technical sales for the local hobby shop said it was their first sponsorship of a race and they planned to do it again and expand their product line for FPV drones and many other similar sports.

“It was definitely a great experience. I got to meet customers from all over the province and outside the province,” he said. “It is an up and coming sporting event and to be able to be part of that growth is definitely something we want to do.”

Jerome Demers, drove eight hours from Quebec to participate in the race, but he really enjoys another aspect of the sport- he likes to build his own drones and tinker with their frames and mechanics.

“I've always been interested in robotics and the mechanical aspect of the sport is interesting,” he said. “It's also the challenge. You know you can always get better and you always know you didn't do something right, you are always trying to get better and go further.”

Flying high while sitting still

News Oct 18, 2016 by Victoria Gray Brant News

When Ben Davis puts on his goggles he can fly like a fighter pilot.

“I can do things with the drone people only dream of, but there is no danger,” he said.

David flew from Newfoundland to fly his drone in the 2016 FPV Fall Classic Drone Race at the Paris Fair Grounds on Saturday and Sunday.

“I usually try to get out to a few races a year,” he said. “This race is really good quality.”

More than 30 racers came to fly their drones at the race director and announced by Joe Scully who said there are usually about 100 pilots, but many of them were at the Official World Drone Racing Championship in Hawaii.

“This is a really big deal for a lot of guys,” he said. “It's a growing sport and they'll come from all over to race other guys.”

The 1,275 foot course forced pilots to have their three to 12 inch drones fly through obstacles, bridges and more for three laps. Those with the best time on Saturday advanced to the championship on Sunday.

Scully said it's a growing sport and he travels all around the world to commentate races with more than 200 pilots.

“I think as soon as this gets to television it will be huge,” he said.

He has run races in Ontario since 2014, but, this is the first time the Fall Classic was held in Paris, but he thinks the race may have found a permanent home.

“This is a perfect location for us,” he said. “It's nice and open, no obstructions and there is an inside space for us in case it rains.”

Paris Junction Hobbies sponsored the race and set up an emergency mechanical station where pilots who crashed could have a place to go to get the parts and support they needed to get back into the air quickly.

Brandon McLaughlin, technical sales for the local hobby shop said it was their first sponsorship of a race and they planned to do it again and expand their product line for FPV drones and many other similar sports.

“It was definitely a great experience. I got to meet customers from all over the province and outside the province,” he said. “It is an up and coming sporting event and to be able to be part of that growth is definitely something we want to do.”

Jerome Demers, drove eight hours from Quebec to participate in the race, but he really enjoys another aspect of the sport- he likes to build his own drones and tinker with their frames and mechanics.

“I've always been interested in robotics and the mechanical aspect of the sport is interesting,” he said. “It's also the challenge. You know you can always get better and you always know you didn't do something right, you are always trying to get better and go further.”