FOCUS ON SENIORS: Paris becoming a dementia-friendly town

News Jul 22, 2016 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Paris is changing.

Shops and boutiques are thriving all along Grand River Street North and nearby. The restaurant scene is growing. Handsome cobblestone homes connect residents to the town’s stately past.

All this has led the town’s leaders to promote Paris as “Canada’s prettiest little town” and “Canada’s cobblestone capital.”

But these days, Paris is also on its way to becoming a dementia-friendly community.

“Paris is an example of a town where people with dementia can live well in their community,’ said Kerri Emberlin, team lead – volunteer engagement with the Alzheimer Society of Brant.

“As long as a community has the necessary supports in place, people with memory loss can remain in their homes.”

A dementia-friendly community’ is the goal of many local businesses who are working with the Alzheimer Society to train their staff to be able to better recognize and serve the unique needs of people living with dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common of a large group of disorders known as dementia. It is an irreversible disease of the brain that causes a person’s thinking ability and memory to deteriorate. The ability to perform simple, everyday living activities is affected.

Emberlin estimates 2,200 people in Brantford and Brant are diagnosed with dementia and another 22,000 people are impacted.

“One person with dementia affects ten others,” she said. “These people become caregivers responsible for assisting with shopping, medical appointments and other daily activities that we take for granted.”

Recognizing that people with dementia are part of the local economy and need to access shops and businesses, Emberlin oversees a group of volunteers who conduct seminars to train shopkeepers and their staff in better serving people living with dementia.

After attending the session, everyone comes away with a better understanding of how they can improve their customer service to better meet the needs of people with dementia.

“So far we have trained about 100 people in Paris and Brant County,” Emberlin says. “Businesses such as the Paris LCBO, Brant Paris Family Eye Care, the library staff and others have attended.”

The training consists of defining the different types of dementia and outlining the supports that people with dementia need to be included and be able live independently.

Reaction from those who have completed the training has been very positive.

“We had 15 staff members attend a training session,” said Jenn Caskil, assistant manager at Brant Paris Family Eye Care.

“We learned lots of strategies you can implement right away to help people with dementia and their families. I recommend all businesses take the training.”

Brant County council is also doing its part. A community services staff member will receive dementia-friendly training and develop a policy and implement staff training.

The initiative will lead to enhanced understanding and awareness and assist people with dementia.

County facilities will display the Dementia Friendly Community sticker, showing their partnership with the initiative.

Emberlin is encouraged by the reaction to the training.

Brant County is an early adapter of Dementia-Friendly Community training, having been preceded by Kingston, Bobcaygeon, and a few other centres.

“Our goal is to eventually offer seminars throughout all of Brant,” Emberlin said.

“People with dementia do better when they are socially engaged, physically active and their minds are in motion.

“A dementia-friendly community assists people to remain in their homes longer as well as raise awareness that people with dementia can live well in their community.”

Lucy Marco, president of the Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA), said community support for people with dementia and their families plays a significant role in ensuring the community is a better place to live.

On Aug. 19, GRCOA, in co-operation with MPP Dave Levac, will host its next gathering of seniors, older adults, caregivers, stakeholders and community agencies at the Brant Sports Complex on Rest Acres Road.

The theme is “respect and social inclusion.”

Registration commences at 8:30 a.m.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Paris becoming a dementia-friendly town

Alzheimer Society of Brant conducting seminars to train local workers on how to serve people with dementia

News Jul 22, 2016 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Paris is changing.

Shops and boutiques are thriving all along Grand River Street North and nearby. The restaurant scene is growing. Handsome cobblestone homes connect residents to the town’s stately past.

All this has led the town’s leaders to promote Paris as “Canada’s prettiest little town” and “Canada’s cobblestone capital.”

But these days, Paris is also on its way to becoming a dementia-friendly community.

“Paris is an example of a town where people with dementia can live well in their community,’ said Kerri Emberlin, team lead – volunteer engagement with the Alzheimer Society of Brant.

“As long as a community has the necessary supports in place, people with memory loss can remain in their homes.”

A dementia-friendly community’ is the goal of many local businesses who are working with the Alzheimer Society to train their staff to be able to better recognize and serve the unique needs of people living with dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common of a large group of disorders known as dementia. It is an irreversible disease of the brain that causes a person’s thinking ability and memory to deteriorate. The ability to perform simple, everyday living activities is affected.

Emberlin estimates 2,200 people in Brantford and Brant are diagnosed with dementia and another 22,000 people are impacted.

“One person with dementia affects ten others,” she said. “These people become caregivers responsible for assisting with shopping, medical appointments and other daily activities that we take for granted.”

Recognizing that people with dementia are part of the local economy and need to access shops and businesses, Emberlin oversees a group of volunteers who conduct seminars to train shopkeepers and their staff in better serving people living with dementia.

After attending the session, everyone comes away with a better understanding of how they can improve their customer service to better meet the needs of people with dementia.

“So far we have trained about 100 people in Paris and Brant County,” Emberlin says. “Businesses such as the Paris LCBO, Brant Paris Family Eye Care, the library staff and others have attended.”

The training consists of defining the different types of dementia and outlining the supports that people with dementia need to be included and be able live independently.

Reaction from those who have completed the training has been very positive.

“We had 15 staff members attend a training session,” said Jenn Caskil, assistant manager at Brant Paris Family Eye Care.

“We learned lots of strategies you can implement right away to help people with dementia and their families. I recommend all businesses take the training.”

Brant County council is also doing its part. A community services staff member will receive dementia-friendly training and develop a policy and implement staff training.

The initiative will lead to enhanced understanding and awareness and assist people with dementia.

County facilities will display the Dementia Friendly Community sticker, showing their partnership with the initiative.

Emberlin is encouraged by the reaction to the training.

Brant County is an early adapter of Dementia-Friendly Community training, having been preceded by Kingston, Bobcaygeon, and a few other centres.

“Our goal is to eventually offer seminars throughout all of Brant,” Emberlin said.

“People with dementia do better when they are socially engaged, physically active and their minds are in motion.

“A dementia-friendly community assists people to remain in their homes longer as well as raise awareness that people with dementia can live well in their community.”

Lucy Marco, president of the Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA), said community support for people with dementia and their families plays a significant role in ensuring the community is a better place to live.

On Aug. 19, GRCOA, in co-operation with MPP Dave Levac, will host its next gathering of seniors, older adults, caregivers, stakeholders and community agencies at the Brant Sports Complex on Rest Acres Road.

The theme is “respect and social inclusion.”

Registration commences at 8:30 a.m.

FOCUS ON SENIORS: Paris becoming a dementia-friendly town

Alzheimer Society of Brant conducting seminars to train local workers on how to serve people with dementia

News Jul 22, 2016 by Gary Chalk Brant News

Paris is changing.

Shops and boutiques are thriving all along Grand River Street North and nearby. The restaurant scene is growing. Handsome cobblestone homes connect residents to the town’s stately past.

All this has led the town’s leaders to promote Paris as “Canada’s prettiest little town” and “Canada’s cobblestone capital.”

But these days, Paris is also on its way to becoming a dementia-friendly community.

“Paris is an example of a town where people with dementia can live well in their community,’ said Kerri Emberlin, team lead – volunteer engagement with the Alzheimer Society of Brant.

“As long as a community has the necessary supports in place, people with memory loss can remain in their homes.”

A dementia-friendly community’ is the goal of many local businesses who are working with the Alzheimer Society to train their staff to be able to better recognize and serve the unique needs of people living with dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common of a large group of disorders known as dementia. It is an irreversible disease of the brain that causes a person’s thinking ability and memory to deteriorate. The ability to perform simple, everyday living activities is affected.

Emberlin estimates 2,200 people in Brantford and Brant are diagnosed with dementia and another 22,000 people are impacted.

“One person with dementia affects ten others,” she said. “These people become caregivers responsible for assisting with shopping, medical appointments and other daily activities that we take for granted.”

Recognizing that people with dementia are part of the local economy and need to access shops and businesses, Emberlin oversees a group of volunteers who conduct seminars to train shopkeepers and their staff in better serving people living with dementia.

After attending the session, everyone comes away with a better understanding of how they can improve their customer service to better meet the needs of people with dementia.

“So far we have trained about 100 people in Paris and Brant County,” Emberlin says. “Businesses such as the Paris LCBO, Brant Paris Family Eye Care, the library staff and others have attended.”

The training consists of defining the different types of dementia and outlining the supports that people with dementia need to be included and be able live independently.

Reaction from those who have completed the training has been very positive.

“We had 15 staff members attend a training session,” said Jenn Caskil, assistant manager at Brant Paris Family Eye Care.

“We learned lots of strategies you can implement right away to help people with dementia and their families. I recommend all businesses take the training.”

Brant County council is also doing its part. A community services staff member will receive dementia-friendly training and develop a policy and implement staff training.

The initiative will lead to enhanced understanding and awareness and assist people with dementia.

County facilities will display the Dementia Friendly Community sticker, showing their partnership with the initiative.

Emberlin is encouraged by the reaction to the training.

Brant County is an early adapter of Dementia-Friendly Community training, having been preceded by Kingston, Bobcaygeon, and a few other centres.

“Our goal is to eventually offer seminars throughout all of Brant,” Emberlin said.

“People with dementia do better when they are socially engaged, physically active and their minds are in motion.

“A dementia-friendly community assists people to remain in their homes longer as well as raise awareness that people with dementia can live well in their community.”

Lucy Marco, president of the Grand River Council on Aging (GRCOA), said community support for people with dementia and their families plays a significant role in ensuring the community is a better place to live.

On Aug. 19, GRCOA, in co-operation with MPP Dave Levac, will host its next gathering of seniors, older adults, caregivers, stakeholders and community agencies at the Brant Sports Complex on Rest Acres Road.

The theme is “respect and social inclusion.”

Registration commences at 8:30 a.m.