Learning a lesson in hunger

News Sep 23, 2015 by Brian Shypula Brant News

Any chance for a litre of milk, assistant Crown attorney Larry Brock hinted.

No, said Tammy Gamble, food distribution co-ordinator at the Brantford Food Bank.

It was a humbling moment for a man trained to make compelling arguments in court front of judges and juries.

Brock, wearing his courtroom garb, left the Clarence Street food bank with a three-day emergency food hamper.

Humble and hunger were just getting started.

Brock, who is chair of the 2015 Brant United Way campaign, and eight other community leaders connected to the United Way were taking part in the Do the Math Challenge.

Their challenge was to live exclusively off the non-perishable and perishable food in the hamper for three days beginning Tuesday. They were not allowed to eat out or accept free food or drink.

“There’s not very many ways for them to get a deeper understanding of why it is we fundraise and support the community,” said Sherry Haines, the United Way’s executive director.

Bona fide users of the food bank sometimes must stretch the food hamper to last a week to 10 days out of necessity.

Brock’s hamper included two frozen chicken breasts, frozen asparagus tips, one tomato, 24 cheese slices, two cans of creamed corn, two cans of pasta in sauce, tin of chicken flakes, pack of Kraft Dinner, single-serving fruit cup, one bun and three pitas, two packs of instant oatmeal and tea bags.

“It’s sad that this represents my fruit for the next three days,” he said of the single fruit cup.

It’s a far cry from his usual diet of steaks, roast, hamburgers, lots of pasta and pizza at least twice a week, but represents a balanced and healthy diet to the best of the food bank’s ability.

“We want to give the clients as much as we can, and it’s hard when things are limited,” Gamble said.

Every client wasn’t eligible for a litre of milk on Monday because there wasn’t enough. It was families-only.

“It’s luck of the draw,” Gamble said.

“It’s going to be a big challenge,” Brock said.

The assistant Crown was headed to St. Catharines for the second week of a two-week sex assault trial he is prosecuting. It meant he was going to use a single burner and microwave in his hotel to prepare meals from his hamper.

Also a diabetic, he said it’s important to his health to maintain his blood-sugar levels. The food bank added sweeteners to his hamper.

But Brock was left wondering about keeping up his caloric intake during the stress of the trial and missing the “pick-me-up” of coffee-and-muffin breaks through the long days.

“Water’s not going to do as a substitute, so that’ll be different,” he said.

The others taking the challenge were United Way staffers Roxanne Bond and Jessica Halls and her husband Tim, and four members from the United Way board and campaign cabinet: Brantford police Sgt. Mike Scibberas, Gerry Smits, and Steve and Chandra Portelli.

They were encouraged to journal about their experiences and discuss how they feel physically, mentally and emotionally on social media. The challenge is being shared on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtags #BUWDoTheMath and tagging @BrantUnitedWay.

The Do the Math Challenge highlights Hunger Awareness Week from Sept. 21 to Sept. 25 and the upcoming Thanks-4-Giving Municipal Food Drive in support of the food bank that begins Sept. 26 and runs through Oct. 31.

The food bank serves about 2,800 individuals each month on average. The monthly usage remains about 27 per cent higher than prior to the 2008 recession, said Heather Vanner, executive director of the Community Resource Service.

Haines said the challenge reinforces the need to donate quality and healthy foods.

The food bank has refrigeration and freezers so it is able to accept perishable food including fresh produce, meats and dairy products as well as frozen products at its location at 1100 Clarence St.

Vanner encouraged individuals, groups, businesses and others to organize food drives during the Thanks-4-Giving.

“Our goal is 25,000 pounds,” she said.

The food bank needs to restock its shelves. Supplies and donations typically run low during the summer but usage is high, especially with more children not able to access in-school nutrition programs during the break.

Representatives from the food bank will be at the Brantford Farmer’s Market on Saturday to accept donations of perishable and non-perishable food.

Learning a lesson in hunger

News Sep 23, 2015 by Brian Shypula Brant News

Any chance for a litre of milk, assistant Crown attorney Larry Brock hinted.

No, said Tammy Gamble, food distribution co-ordinator at the Brantford Food Bank.

It was a humbling moment for a man trained to make compelling arguments in court front of judges and juries.

Brock, wearing his courtroom garb, left the Clarence Street food bank with a three-day emergency food hamper.

Humble and hunger were just getting started.

Brock, who is chair of the 2015 Brant United Way campaign, and eight other community leaders connected to the United Way were taking part in the Do the Math Challenge.

Their challenge was to live exclusively off the non-perishable and perishable food in the hamper for three days beginning Tuesday. They were not allowed to eat out or accept free food or drink.

“There’s not very many ways for them to get a deeper understanding of why it is we fundraise and support the community,” said Sherry Haines, the United Way’s executive director.

Bona fide users of the food bank sometimes must stretch the food hamper to last a week to 10 days out of necessity.

Brock’s hamper included two frozen chicken breasts, frozen asparagus tips, one tomato, 24 cheese slices, two cans of creamed corn, two cans of pasta in sauce, tin of chicken flakes, pack of Kraft Dinner, single-serving fruit cup, one bun and three pitas, two packs of instant oatmeal and tea bags.

“It’s sad that this represents my fruit for the next three days,” he said of the single fruit cup.

It’s a far cry from his usual diet of steaks, roast, hamburgers, lots of pasta and pizza at least twice a week, but represents a balanced and healthy diet to the best of the food bank’s ability.

“We want to give the clients as much as we can, and it’s hard when things are limited,” Gamble said.

Every client wasn’t eligible for a litre of milk on Monday because there wasn’t enough. It was families-only.

“It’s luck of the draw,” Gamble said.

“It’s going to be a big challenge,” Brock said.

The assistant Crown was headed to St. Catharines for the second week of a two-week sex assault trial he is prosecuting. It meant he was going to use a single burner and microwave in his hotel to prepare meals from his hamper.

Also a diabetic, he said it’s important to his health to maintain his blood-sugar levels. The food bank added sweeteners to his hamper.

But Brock was left wondering about keeping up his caloric intake during the stress of the trial and missing the “pick-me-up” of coffee-and-muffin breaks through the long days.

“Water’s not going to do as a substitute, so that’ll be different,” he said.

The others taking the challenge were United Way staffers Roxanne Bond and Jessica Halls and her husband Tim, and four members from the United Way board and campaign cabinet: Brantford police Sgt. Mike Scibberas, Gerry Smits, and Steve and Chandra Portelli.

They were encouraged to journal about their experiences and discuss how they feel physically, mentally and emotionally on social media. The challenge is being shared on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtags #BUWDoTheMath and tagging @BrantUnitedWay.

The Do the Math Challenge highlights Hunger Awareness Week from Sept. 21 to Sept. 25 and the upcoming Thanks-4-Giving Municipal Food Drive in support of the food bank that begins Sept. 26 and runs through Oct. 31.

The food bank serves about 2,800 individuals each month on average. The monthly usage remains about 27 per cent higher than prior to the 2008 recession, said Heather Vanner, executive director of the Community Resource Service.

Haines said the challenge reinforces the need to donate quality and healthy foods.

The food bank has refrigeration and freezers so it is able to accept perishable food including fresh produce, meats and dairy products as well as frozen products at its location at 1100 Clarence St.

Vanner encouraged individuals, groups, businesses and others to organize food drives during the Thanks-4-Giving.

“Our goal is 25,000 pounds,” she said.

The food bank needs to restock its shelves. Supplies and donations typically run low during the summer but usage is high, especially with more children not able to access in-school nutrition programs during the break.

Representatives from the food bank will be at the Brantford Farmer’s Market on Saturday to accept donations of perishable and non-perishable food.

Learning a lesson in hunger

News Sep 23, 2015 by Brian Shypula Brant News

Any chance for a litre of milk, assistant Crown attorney Larry Brock hinted.

No, said Tammy Gamble, food distribution co-ordinator at the Brantford Food Bank.

It was a humbling moment for a man trained to make compelling arguments in court front of judges and juries.

Brock, wearing his courtroom garb, left the Clarence Street food bank with a three-day emergency food hamper.

Humble and hunger were just getting started.

Brock, who is chair of the 2015 Brant United Way campaign, and eight other community leaders connected to the United Way were taking part in the Do the Math Challenge.

Their challenge was to live exclusively off the non-perishable and perishable food in the hamper for three days beginning Tuesday. They were not allowed to eat out or accept free food or drink.

“There’s not very many ways for them to get a deeper understanding of why it is we fundraise and support the community,” said Sherry Haines, the United Way’s executive director.

Bona fide users of the food bank sometimes must stretch the food hamper to last a week to 10 days out of necessity.

Brock’s hamper included two frozen chicken breasts, frozen asparagus tips, one tomato, 24 cheese slices, two cans of creamed corn, two cans of pasta in sauce, tin of chicken flakes, pack of Kraft Dinner, single-serving fruit cup, one bun and three pitas, two packs of instant oatmeal and tea bags.

“It’s sad that this represents my fruit for the next three days,” he said of the single fruit cup.

It’s a far cry from his usual diet of steaks, roast, hamburgers, lots of pasta and pizza at least twice a week, but represents a balanced and healthy diet to the best of the food bank’s ability.

“We want to give the clients as much as we can, and it’s hard when things are limited,” Gamble said.

Every client wasn’t eligible for a litre of milk on Monday because there wasn’t enough. It was families-only.

“It’s luck of the draw,” Gamble said.

“It’s going to be a big challenge,” Brock said.

The assistant Crown was headed to St. Catharines for the second week of a two-week sex assault trial he is prosecuting. It meant he was going to use a single burner and microwave in his hotel to prepare meals from his hamper.

Also a diabetic, he said it’s important to his health to maintain his blood-sugar levels. The food bank added sweeteners to his hamper.

But Brock was left wondering about keeping up his caloric intake during the stress of the trial and missing the “pick-me-up” of coffee-and-muffin breaks through the long days.

“Water’s not going to do as a substitute, so that’ll be different,” he said.

The others taking the challenge were United Way staffers Roxanne Bond and Jessica Halls and her husband Tim, and four members from the United Way board and campaign cabinet: Brantford police Sgt. Mike Scibberas, Gerry Smits, and Steve and Chandra Portelli.

They were encouraged to journal about their experiences and discuss how they feel physically, mentally and emotionally on social media. The challenge is being shared on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtags #BUWDoTheMath and tagging @BrantUnitedWay.

The Do the Math Challenge highlights Hunger Awareness Week from Sept. 21 to Sept. 25 and the upcoming Thanks-4-Giving Municipal Food Drive in support of the food bank that begins Sept. 26 and runs through Oct. 31.

The food bank serves about 2,800 individuals each month on average. The monthly usage remains about 27 per cent higher than prior to the 2008 recession, said Heather Vanner, executive director of the Community Resource Service.

Haines said the challenge reinforces the need to donate quality and healthy foods.

The food bank has refrigeration and freezers so it is able to accept perishable food including fresh produce, meats and dairy products as well as frozen products at its location at 1100 Clarence St.

Vanner encouraged individuals, groups, businesses and others to organize food drives during the Thanks-4-Giving.

“Our goal is 25,000 pounds,” she said.

The food bank needs to restock its shelves. Supplies and donations typically run low during the summer but usage is high, especially with more children not able to access in-school nutrition programs during the break.

Representatives from the food bank will be at the Brantford Farmer’s Market on Saturday to accept donations of perishable and non-perishable food.