Concerned citizens win support from county council

News Mar 25, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant have once again asked County of Brant council to pass motions encouraging safeguards for Paris’ water supply in light of a planned a gravel pit.

Nick Greenacre, a member of the Concerned Citizens of Brant, made the requests at council’s Tuesday meeting, focusing on atrazine, a widely used herbicide he says has been linked to breast cancer in women.

The group is concerned Dufferin Aggregates’ request for a permit to take water (PTTW) at the new Watts Pond Road gravel pit will result in unhealthy levels of atrazine contamination in the water.

Greenacre asked for a motion in support of the Lake Erie Region Source Protection Committee’s motion from last November that the committee continues to “express their concerns with regard to land uses and activities that penetrate the municipal aquifer and or increase the vulnerability of wellhead protection areas or intake protection.”

Coun. David Miller asked for a slight rewording that didn’t appear to change the ultimate meaning.

Council voted in favour of supporting the motion.

The CCOB also requested the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) deny Dufferin’s application for a PTTW, for fear the resulting aggregate wash pond will badly contaminate the community’s water supply.

Coun. Robert Chambers said the resolution reaffirms a 2014 resolution passed by council, which carried the resolution a second time on Tuesday.

Greenacre also requested a motion to direct county staff to test the Gilbert and Telfer wellheads for atrazine at a detection limit of 0.1 ppb.

All but Coun. Brian Coleman were in favour of the more sensitive testing.

The fourth motion, carried by council, granted the CCOB permission to test Paris drinking water at a regulated laboratory.

Coleman said he has been using atrazine for decades and has seen no ill effects.

“I’ve been using atrazine for 50 years now,” said Coleman, a farmer. “It’s been on my hands, in my mouth and as I wipe my nose, even as I smoke a cigarette.”

Coleman said he believes rotating crops in his fields from year to year has kept the herbicide from accumulating on his land to dangerous levels.

Coun. John Wheat agreed, noting that three generations of Colemans have farmed that land and experienced no sickness.

Greenacre pointed out that atrazine has been linked to increased incidence of breast cancer.

“A lot of women in the Paris Plains area have been lost to breast cancer,” he said.

CCOB president Jeff Broomfield said that atrazine contamination is “just one piece of the puzzle” that leads to breast cancer.

Broomfield reminded council that Dr. Ken Howard, a hydrogeologist and contamination specialist who aided the Walkerton Inquiry, expressed doubt at a February stakeholders meeting about studies saying Paris’ water will be safe if Dufferin is allowed to take water from the site to clean excavated aggregate.

Kevin Mitchell of Dufferin Aggregates said the company has yet to hear from the MOECC’s decision regarding the application for a PTTW.

Concerned citizens win support from county council

Group asks for better water testing near gravel pit site

News Mar 25, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant have once again asked County of Brant council to pass motions encouraging safeguards for Paris’ water supply in light of a planned a gravel pit.

Nick Greenacre, a member of the Concerned Citizens of Brant, made the requests at council’s Tuesday meeting, focusing on atrazine, a widely used herbicide he says has been linked to breast cancer in women.

The group is concerned Dufferin Aggregates’ request for a permit to take water (PTTW) at the new Watts Pond Road gravel pit will result in unhealthy levels of atrazine contamination in the water.

Greenacre asked for a motion in support of the Lake Erie Region Source Protection Committee’s motion from last November that the committee continues to “express their concerns with regard to land uses and activities that penetrate the municipal aquifer and or increase the vulnerability of wellhead protection areas or intake protection.”

Coun. David Miller asked for a slight rewording that didn’t appear to change the ultimate meaning.

Council voted in favour of supporting the motion.

The CCOB also requested the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) deny Dufferin’s application for a PTTW, for fear the resulting aggregate wash pond will badly contaminate the community’s water supply.

Coun. Robert Chambers said the resolution reaffirms a 2014 resolution passed by council, which carried the resolution a second time on Tuesday.

Greenacre also requested a motion to direct county staff to test the Gilbert and Telfer wellheads for atrazine at a detection limit of 0.1 ppb.

All but Coun. Brian Coleman were in favour of the more sensitive testing.

The fourth motion, carried by council, granted the CCOB permission to test Paris drinking water at a regulated laboratory.

Coleman said he has been using atrazine for decades and has seen no ill effects.

“I’ve been using atrazine for 50 years now,” said Coleman, a farmer. “It’s been on my hands, in my mouth and as I wipe my nose, even as I smoke a cigarette.”

Coleman said he believes rotating crops in his fields from year to year has kept the herbicide from accumulating on his land to dangerous levels.

Coun. John Wheat agreed, noting that three generations of Colemans have farmed that land and experienced no sickness.

Greenacre pointed out that atrazine has been linked to increased incidence of breast cancer.

“A lot of women in the Paris Plains area have been lost to breast cancer,” he said.

CCOB president Jeff Broomfield said that atrazine contamination is “just one piece of the puzzle” that leads to breast cancer.

Broomfield reminded council that Dr. Ken Howard, a hydrogeologist and contamination specialist who aided the Walkerton Inquiry, expressed doubt at a February stakeholders meeting about studies saying Paris’ water will be safe if Dufferin is allowed to take water from the site to clean excavated aggregate.

Kevin Mitchell of Dufferin Aggregates said the company has yet to hear from the MOECC’s decision regarding the application for a PTTW.

Concerned citizens win support from county council

Group asks for better water testing near gravel pit site

News Mar 25, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant have once again asked County of Brant council to pass motions encouraging safeguards for Paris’ water supply in light of a planned a gravel pit.

Nick Greenacre, a member of the Concerned Citizens of Brant, made the requests at council’s Tuesday meeting, focusing on atrazine, a widely used herbicide he says has been linked to breast cancer in women.

The group is concerned Dufferin Aggregates’ request for a permit to take water (PTTW) at the new Watts Pond Road gravel pit will result in unhealthy levels of atrazine contamination in the water.

Greenacre asked for a motion in support of the Lake Erie Region Source Protection Committee’s motion from last November that the committee continues to “express their concerns with regard to land uses and activities that penetrate the municipal aquifer and or increase the vulnerability of wellhead protection areas or intake protection.”

Coun. David Miller asked for a slight rewording that didn’t appear to change the ultimate meaning.

Council voted in favour of supporting the motion.

The CCOB also requested the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) deny Dufferin’s application for a PTTW, for fear the resulting aggregate wash pond will badly contaminate the community’s water supply.

Coun. Robert Chambers said the resolution reaffirms a 2014 resolution passed by council, which carried the resolution a second time on Tuesday.

Greenacre also requested a motion to direct county staff to test the Gilbert and Telfer wellheads for atrazine at a detection limit of 0.1 ppb.

All but Coun. Brian Coleman were in favour of the more sensitive testing.

The fourth motion, carried by council, granted the CCOB permission to test Paris drinking water at a regulated laboratory.

Coleman said he has been using atrazine for decades and has seen no ill effects.

“I’ve been using atrazine for 50 years now,” said Coleman, a farmer. “It’s been on my hands, in my mouth and as I wipe my nose, even as I smoke a cigarette.”

Coleman said he believes rotating crops in his fields from year to year has kept the herbicide from accumulating on his land to dangerous levels.

Coun. John Wheat agreed, noting that three generations of Colemans have farmed that land and experienced no sickness.

Greenacre pointed out that atrazine has been linked to increased incidence of breast cancer.

“A lot of women in the Paris Plains area have been lost to breast cancer,” he said.

CCOB president Jeff Broomfield said that atrazine contamination is “just one piece of the puzzle” that leads to breast cancer.

Broomfield reminded council that Dr. Ken Howard, a hydrogeologist and contamination specialist who aided the Walkerton Inquiry, expressed doubt at a February stakeholders meeting about studies saying Paris’ water will be safe if Dufferin is allowed to take water from the site to clean excavated aggregate.

Kevin Mitchell of Dufferin Aggregates said the company has yet to hear from the MOECC’s decision regarding the application for a PTTW.