Committee supports Watts Pond Road work

News Jan 14, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

Brant's public works committee supported a request by Dufferin Aggregates to ask for bids on Watts Pond Road improvements Tuesday.

Kevin Mitchell, director of property, planning and approvals at Holcim Canada Inc., Dufferin's parent company, told the committee work needed for 1 km of the road leading to a new sand and gravel pit is ready for tender.

The design to reconstruct Watts Pond Road is all but completed, according to Mitchell. Improvements will make it suitable for heavy truck traffic from the gravel pit, which has already started removing aggregate from the 640 acres owned by Dufferin, north and south of Watts Pond Road.

"We're ready to start shipping to our customers," Mitchell said. "We've got product ready to go."

County of Brant council supported the call for improvements back in August 2013.

Dufferin is paying for the estimated $1.1 million reconstruction work hoped to begin in April.

Opening the gravel pit means similar improvements are called for to Watts Pond Road west of Pinehurst Road and over to Ayr Road, which will be taken care of by the county. Holcim has contributed $1.5 million in aggregate to help with the cost of that project, estimated to cost about $2 million.

However, Brant's manager of public works Mike Tout said the county's work on Watts Pond Road won't happen until 2016 because it can handle truck traffic for now, but it will need a bit of new asphalt. There is currently pre-engineering work underway.

Drumbo Road has been considered as a possible route for the trucks, but it's in very bad shape, takes trucks further away from Highway 403 and would require more work and funds. Instead, the trucks will take Watts Pond Road, turn left onto Ayr Road, follow it to Keg Lane, head west to Brant-Oxford Road, follow it south to Highway 2, head east on 2 to Rest Acres Road and then south to Highway 403.

Councillor David Miller said "it's a good idea" to get the improvements to Watts Pond Road underway as soon as possible to mitigate the impact of truck traffic on other area roads.

Mitchell responded to a question from Councilor Dan Cardy, saying that Dufferin has all of the approvals needed to extract from the site, including the proper zoning and an Official Plan designation from the county, and an Aggregate Resources Act licence issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

One major hurdle left for Dufferin is obtain a Permit to Take Water (PTTW) from the Ministry of the Environment (MOE), which has been challenged by the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) since Dufferin announced opening the Paris pit three years ago with a licence granted 40 years ago. Mitchell said the licence meets all of the current government standards and regulations, despite its age.

With the permit, Dufferin would use the water to create a wash pond for cleaning the aggregate mined from the site.

The ministry will be holding a technical advisory meeting on the PTTW in the near future. Mitchell said all of the concerned agencies, including the County of Brant, Six Nations and the CCOB will be invited. After the meeting, the MOE will make a decision on the PTTW application. 

"We hope the MOE decision will be made before the summer," Mitchell said.

Dufferin's Paris pit contains 32 million tonnes of aggregate and is expected to have a life of approximately 40 years.

Final approval of the work on Watts Pond Road is up to County of Brant council at its next meeting on Jan. 27.

Committee supports Watts Pond Road work

Paris gravel pit ready to ship product

News Jan 14, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

Brant's public works committee supported a request by Dufferin Aggregates to ask for bids on Watts Pond Road improvements Tuesday.

Kevin Mitchell, director of property, planning and approvals at Holcim Canada Inc., Dufferin's parent company, told the committee work needed for 1 km of the road leading to a new sand and gravel pit is ready for tender.

The design to reconstruct Watts Pond Road is all but completed, according to Mitchell. Improvements will make it suitable for heavy truck traffic from the gravel pit, which has already started removing aggregate from the 640 acres owned by Dufferin, north and south of Watts Pond Road.

"We're ready to start shipping to our customers," Mitchell said. "We've got product ready to go."

County of Brant council supported the call for improvements back in August 2013.

Dufferin is paying for the estimated $1.1 million reconstruction work hoped to begin in April.

Opening the gravel pit means similar improvements are called for to Watts Pond Road west of Pinehurst Road and over to Ayr Road, which will be taken care of by the county. Holcim has contributed $1.5 million in aggregate to help with the cost of that project, estimated to cost about $2 million.

However, Brant's manager of public works Mike Tout said the county's work on Watts Pond Road won't happen until 2016 because it can handle truck traffic for now, but it will need a bit of new asphalt. There is currently pre-engineering work underway.

Drumbo Road has been considered as a possible route for the trucks, but it's in very bad shape, takes trucks further away from Highway 403 and would require more work and funds. Instead, the trucks will take Watts Pond Road, turn left onto Ayr Road, follow it to Keg Lane, head west to Brant-Oxford Road, follow it south to Highway 2, head east on 2 to Rest Acres Road and then south to Highway 403.

Councillor David Miller said "it's a good idea" to get the improvements to Watts Pond Road underway as soon as possible to mitigate the impact of truck traffic on other area roads.

Mitchell responded to a question from Councilor Dan Cardy, saying that Dufferin has all of the approvals needed to extract from the site, including the proper zoning and an Official Plan designation from the county, and an Aggregate Resources Act licence issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

One major hurdle left for Dufferin is obtain a Permit to Take Water (PTTW) from the Ministry of the Environment (MOE), which has been challenged by the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) since Dufferin announced opening the Paris pit three years ago with a licence granted 40 years ago. Mitchell said the licence meets all of the current government standards and regulations, despite its age.

With the permit, Dufferin would use the water to create a wash pond for cleaning the aggregate mined from the site.

The ministry will be holding a technical advisory meeting on the PTTW in the near future. Mitchell said all of the concerned agencies, including the County of Brant, Six Nations and the CCOB will be invited. After the meeting, the MOE will make a decision on the PTTW application. 

"We hope the MOE decision will be made before the summer," Mitchell said.

Dufferin's Paris pit contains 32 million tonnes of aggregate and is expected to have a life of approximately 40 years.

Final approval of the work on Watts Pond Road is up to County of Brant council at its next meeting on Jan. 27.

Committee supports Watts Pond Road work

Paris gravel pit ready to ship product

News Jan 14, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

Brant's public works committee supported a request by Dufferin Aggregates to ask for bids on Watts Pond Road improvements Tuesday.

Kevin Mitchell, director of property, planning and approvals at Holcim Canada Inc., Dufferin's parent company, told the committee work needed for 1 km of the road leading to a new sand and gravel pit is ready for tender.

The design to reconstruct Watts Pond Road is all but completed, according to Mitchell. Improvements will make it suitable for heavy truck traffic from the gravel pit, which has already started removing aggregate from the 640 acres owned by Dufferin, north and south of Watts Pond Road.

"We're ready to start shipping to our customers," Mitchell said. "We've got product ready to go."

County of Brant council supported the call for improvements back in August 2013.

Dufferin is paying for the estimated $1.1 million reconstruction work hoped to begin in April.

Opening the gravel pit means similar improvements are called for to Watts Pond Road west of Pinehurst Road and over to Ayr Road, which will be taken care of by the county. Holcim has contributed $1.5 million in aggregate to help with the cost of that project, estimated to cost about $2 million.

However, Brant's manager of public works Mike Tout said the county's work on Watts Pond Road won't happen until 2016 because it can handle truck traffic for now, but it will need a bit of new asphalt. There is currently pre-engineering work underway.

Drumbo Road has been considered as a possible route for the trucks, but it's in very bad shape, takes trucks further away from Highway 403 and would require more work and funds. Instead, the trucks will take Watts Pond Road, turn left onto Ayr Road, follow it to Keg Lane, head west to Brant-Oxford Road, follow it south to Highway 2, head east on 2 to Rest Acres Road and then south to Highway 403.

Councillor David Miller said "it's a good idea" to get the improvements to Watts Pond Road underway as soon as possible to mitigate the impact of truck traffic on other area roads.

Mitchell responded to a question from Councilor Dan Cardy, saying that Dufferin has all of the approvals needed to extract from the site, including the proper zoning and an Official Plan designation from the county, and an Aggregate Resources Act licence issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

One major hurdle left for Dufferin is obtain a Permit to Take Water (PTTW) from the Ministry of the Environment (MOE), which has been challenged by the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) since Dufferin announced opening the Paris pit three years ago with a licence granted 40 years ago. Mitchell said the licence meets all of the current government standards and regulations, despite its age.

With the permit, Dufferin would use the water to create a wash pond for cleaning the aggregate mined from the site.

The ministry will be holding a technical advisory meeting on the PTTW in the near future. Mitchell said all of the concerned agencies, including the County of Brant, Six Nations and the CCOB will be invited. After the meeting, the MOE will make a decision on the PTTW application. 

"We hope the MOE decision will be made before the summer," Mitchell said.

Dufferin's Paris pit contains 32 million tonnes of aggregate and is expected to have a life of approximately 40 years.

Final approval of the work on Watts Pond Road is up to County of Brant council at its next meeting on Jan. 27.