Youth speak out over Paris gravel pit

News Jan 05, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

A Paris high school student has spoken out for a youthful contingent against the Dufferin Aggregates pit under construction on Watts Pond Road.

Beth Stulen handed over more than 500 letters written to raise concern over the gravel pit to County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy during the last meeting of the 2010-2014 council.

"I represent not just my generation, but my children and grandchildren," Stulen told council, and members of the community, many of whom are part of the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) group that formed a few years ago when Dufferin announced the gravel pit. "We all depend on the (Telfer) wellhead as a source of clean water."

Stulen handed Eddy a Christmas stocking filled with 506 letters written by people who each "have the right to clean water."

"We're asking council to support the revocation of the gravel pit's licence," she said.

The licence in question was granted roughly 40 years ago to Dufferin by the provincial government. The CCOB has all the while protested that the licence should not be valid due to the fact it was granted when the legislation on aggregate mining was significantly different.

The letters delivered by Stulen request the Minister of the Environment (MOE) not put Brant's drinking water at risk.

The young letter writers point out that evidence found by the MOE’s technical expert committee concludes that removing aggregate from the area will pose a high risk to the drinking water supply for much of Paris.

“With the growing evidence of a looming water shortage around the world, why should we be risking our own water sources?" read the letters. "In the event of water contamination, who will be liable?Who would pay for purifying the water or accessing a new source?”

They are also worried about indirect consequences to the reputation and integrity of Paris, such as decrease in tourism and future economic development.

The letters ask that work be stopped on the pit until a complete scientific evaluation is undertaken of any activity that has the potential for ill effects on the water supply.

Youth speak out over Paris gravel pit

News Jan 05, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

A Paris high school student has spoken out for a youthful contingent against the Dufferin Aggregates pit under construction on Watts Pond Road.

Beth Stulen handed over more than 500 letters written to raise concern over the gravel pit to County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy during the last meeting of the 2010-2014 council.

"I represent not just my generation, but my children and grandchildren," Stulen told council, and members of the community, many of whom are part of the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) group that formed a few years ago when Dufferin announced the gravel pit. "We all depend on the (Telfer) wellhead as a source of clean water."

Stulen handed Eddy a Christmas stocking filled with 506 letters written by people who each "have the right to clean water."

"We're asking council to support the revocation of the gravel pit's licence," she said.

The licence in question was granted roughly 40 years ago to Dufferin by the provincial government. The CCOB has all the while protested that the licence should not be valid due to the fact it was granted when the legislation on aggregate mining was significantly different.

The letters delivered by Stulen request the Minister of the Environment (MOE) not put Brant's drinking water at risk.

The young letter writers point out that evidence found by the MOE’s technical expert committee concludes that removing aggregate from the area will pose a high risk to the drinking water supply for much of Paris.

“With the growing evidence of a looming water shortage around the world, why should we be risking our own water sources?" read the letters. "In the event of water contamination, who will be liable?Who would pay for purifying the water or accessing a new source?”

They are also worried about indirect consequences to the reputation and integrity of Paris, such as decrease in tourism and future economic development.

The letters ask that work be stopped on the pit until a complete scientific evaluation is undertaken of any activity that has the potential for ill effects on the water supply.

Youth speak out over Paris gravel pit

News Jan 05, 2015 by Mike Peeling Brant News

A Paris high school student has spoken out for a youthful contingent against the Dufferin Aggregates pit under construction on Watts Pond Road.

Beth Stulen handed over more than 500 letters written to raise concern over the gravel pit to County of Brant Mayor Ron Eddy during the last meeting of the 2010-2014 council.

"I represent not just my generation, but my children and grandchildren," Stulen told council, and members of the community, many of whom are part of the Concerned Citizens of Brant (CCOB) group that formed a few years ago when Dufferin announced the gravel pit. "We all depend on the (Telfer) wellhead as a source of clean water."

Stulen handed Eddy a Christmas stocking filled with 506 letters written by people who each "have the right to clean water."

"We're asking council to support the revocation of the gravel pit's licence," she said.

The licence in question was granted roughly 40 years ago to Dufferin by the provincial government. The CCOB has all the while protested that the licence should not be valid due to the fact it was granted when the legislation on aggregate mining was significantly different.

The letters delivered by Stulen request the Minister of the Environment (MOE) not put Brant's drinking water at risk.

The young letter writers point out that evidence found by the MOE’s technical expert committee concludes that removing aggregate from the area will pose a high risk to the drinking water supply for much of Paris.

“With the growing evidence of a looming water shortage around the world, why should we be risking our own water sources?" read the letters. "In the event of water contamination, who will be liable?Who would pay for purifying the water or accessing a new source?”

They are also worried about indirect consequences to the reputation and integrity of Paris, such as decrease in tourism and future economic development.

The letters ask that work be stopped on the pit until a complete scientific evaluation is undertaken of any activity that has the potential for ill effects on the water supply.