Program promises better co-ordination of health care for seniors

News Dec 17, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

A new health care initiative aimed at local seniors and other patients with the highest needs was introduced in Brant on Wednesday.

The Brant Six Nations Health Link focuses on the five per cent of patients, often with multiple, complex conditions, who account for about two-thirds of health-care dollars in their treatment.

The Health Link provides those patients with individual care plans and co-ordinated support from a team of providers that could include doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, home care, long-term care and community agencies. They work together to address each patient’s specific needs, said a release from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

“This is what patients expect and what they deserve,” said Ruby Jacobs, the LHIN’s vice chair designate, at the announcement held in the auditorium of the Beckett Adult Leisure Care Centre on Colborne Street.

Jacobs, a Six Nations resident, told a true story of Bernice, a senior in one of the LHIN’s communities. Bernice suffered a fall that eventually led to her being moved into a long-term care home. But it didn’t need to be that way had there been more co-ordination and follow up in her care.

Not only would she have been able to maintain her independence at home but her health care would have cost the province about $100,000 instead of $500,000, she said.

The LHIN said a study found that 75 per cent of seniors with complex conditions who are discharged from hospital receive care from six or more doctors.

“In this time of fiscal restraint, we family health teams are asked to share health resources, collaborate with community health partners as well as diverting patients from the emergency room,” said Cindy Bratt, executive director of the PrimaCare Community Family Health Team. “A vehicle such as health links has potential to help us achieve all of that, and for that I am very excited.”

The Brant Six Nations Health Link is one of 11 Health Links in the HNHB LHIN. It covers Brantford, Brant County and Six Nations and is led by a steering committee.

Staff have been hired and are in the process of planning and co-ordinating care plans, said Jennifer Slawek of the Brant Community Healthcare System.

Brant Community Healthcare System is the lead organization and recipient of $725,000 in funding from the province to deliver the program.

The funding is one-time but with anticipation that it will continue.

Slawec said patients with high needs would be identified by their primary care giver and based on how many times they’ve visited the hospital or other health-care services.

The province announced the Health Link program in December 2012. The ministry approved the Brant Six Nations business plan in the fall.

“We have now moved quickly forward and began to put our plans into action,” said Lina Rinaldi, the Brant Community Healthcare System’s chief operating officer and chief nursing executive.

She introduced several members of the steering committee who attended the announcement.

Other dignitaries included MPP John Fraser, parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care Eric Hoskins, Brant MPP Dave Levac, Six Nations Chief Ava Hill and Brantford Mayor Chris Friel.

“It’s going to provide more care for our seniors, which we like to call our elders. They’re a very important part of our community. They have a lot of tradition and knowledge, they have our oral history and we like to spend time with them and look after them the best that we can,” Hill said.

Friel said better communication offered through Health Link dovetails with the city’s Healthy Brantford initiative, which aims to improve the health of Brantford’s citizens.

“This a nice little launch for us as we start a new mandate for council,” he said.

Other agencies and organization involved include Alzheimer Society, Brantford Emergency Medical Services, Brantford Family Health Organization, Brant County branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Community Care Access Centre, Grand River Community Health Centre, Participation House Brantford, Primacare Community Family Health Team, Six Nations Health Services and Stedman Community Hospice.

Also included are patient and family advisers, a pharmacist and other primary care providers.

Program promises better co-ordination of health care for seniors

News Dec 17, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

A new health care initiative aimed at local seniors and other patients with the highest needs was introduced in Brant on Wednesday.

The Brant Six Nations Health Link focuses on the five per cent of patients, often with multiple, complex conditions, who account for about two-thirds of health-care dollars in their treatment.

The Health Link provides those patients with individual care plans and co-ordinated support from a team of providers that could include doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, home care, long-term care and community agencies. They work together to address each patient’s specific needs, said a release from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

“This is what patients expect and what they deserve,” said Ruby Jacobs, the LHIN’s vice chair designate, at the announcement held in the auditorium of the Beckett Adult Leisure Care Centre on Colborne Street.

Jacobs, a Six Nations resident, told a true story of Bernice, a senior in one of the LHIN’s communities. Bernice suffered a fall that eventually led to her being moved into a long-term care home. But it didn’t need to be that way had there been more co-ordination and follow up in her care.

Not only would she have been able to maintain her independence at home but her health care would have cost the province about $100,000 instead of $500,000, she said.

The LHIN said a study found that 75 per cent of seniors with complex conditions who are discharged from hospital receive care from six or more doctors.

“In this time of fiscal restraint, we family health teams are asked to share health resources, collaborate with community health partners as well as diverting patients from the emergency room,” said Cindy Bratt, executive director of the PrimaCare Community Family Health Team. “A vehicle such as health links has potential to help us achieve all of that, and for that I am very excited.”

The Brant Six Nations Health Link is one of 11 Health Links in the HNHB LHIN. It covers Brantford, Brant County and Six Nations and is led by a steering committee.

Staff have been hired and are in the process of planning and co-ordinating care plans, said Jennifer Slawek of the Brant Community Healthcare System.

Brant Community Healthcare System is the lead organization and recipient of $725,000 in funding from the province to deliver the program.

The funding is one-time but with anticipation that it will continue.

Slawec said patients with high needs would be identified by their primary care giver and based on how many times they’ve visited the hospital or other health-care services.

The province announced the Health Link program in December 2012. The ministry approved the Brant Six Nations business plan in the fall.

“We have now moved quickly forward and began to put our plans into action,” said Lina Rinaldi, the Brant Community Healthcare System’s chief operating officer and chief nursing executive.

She introduced several members of the steering committee who attended the announcement.

Other dignitaries included MPP John Fraser, parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care Eric Hoskins, Brant MPP Dave Levac, Six Nations Chief Ava Hill and Brantford Mayor Chris Friel.

“It’s going to provide more care for our seniors, which we like to call our elders. They’re a very important part of our community. They have a lot of tradition and knowledge, they have our oral history and we like to spend time with them and look after them the best that we can,” Hill said.

Friel said better communication offered through Health Link dovetails with the city’s Healthy Brantford initiative, which aims to improve the health of Brantford’s citizens.

“This a nice little launch for us as we start a new mandate for council,” he said.

Other agencies and organization involved include Alzheimer Society, Brantford Emergency Medical Services, Brantford Family Health Organization, Brant County branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Community Care Access Centre, Grand River Community Health Centre, Participation House Brantford, Primacare Community Family Health Team, Six Nations Health Services and Stedman Community Hospice.

Also included are patient and family advisers, a pharmacist and other primary care providers.

Program promises better co-ordination of health care for seniors

News Dec 17, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

A new health care initiative aimed at local seniors and other patients with the highest needs was introduced in Brant on Wednesday.

The Brant Six Nations Health Link focuses on the five per cent of patients, often with multiple, complex conditions, who account for about two-thirds of health-care dollars in their treatment.

The Health Link provides those patients with individual care plans and co-ordinated support from a team of providers that could include doctors, nurses, specialists, hospitals, home care, long-term care and community agencies. They work together to address each patient’s specific needs, said a release from the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

“This is what patients expect and what they deserve,” said Ruby Jacobs, the LHIN’s vice chair designate, at the announcement held in the auditorium of the Beckett Adult Leisure Care Centre on Colborne Street.

Jacobs, a Six Nations resident, told a true story of Bernice, a senior in one of the LHIN’s communities. Bernice suffered a fall that eventually led to her being moved into a long-term care home. But it didn’t need to be that way had there been more co-ordination and follow up in her care.

Not only would she have been able to maintain her independence at home but her health care would have cost the province about $100,000 instead of $500,000, she said.

The LHIN said a study found that 75 per cent of seniors with complex conditions who are discharged from hospital receive care from six or more doctors.

“In this time of fiscal restraint, we family health teams are asked to share health resources, collaborate with community health partners as well as diverting patients from the emergency room,” said Cindy Bratt, executive director of the PrimaCare Community Family Health Team. “A vehicle such as health links has potential to help us achieve all of that, and for that I am very excited.”

The Brant Six Nations Health Link is one of 11 Health Links in the HNHB LHIN. It covers Brantford, Brant County and Six Nations and is led by a steering committee.

Staff have been hired and are in the process of planning and co-ordinating care plans, said Jennifer Slawek of the Brant Community Healthcare System.

Brant Community Healthcare System is the lead organization and recipient of $725,000 in funding from the province to deliver the program.

The funding is one-time but with anticipation that it will continue.

Slawec said patients with high needs would be identified by their primary care giver and based on how many times they’ve visited the hospital or other health-care services.

The province announced the Health Link program in December 2012. The ministry approved the Brant Six Nations business plan in the fall.

“We have now moved quickly forward and began to put our plans into action,” said Lina Rinaldi, the Brant Community Healthcare System’s chief operating officer and chief nursing executive.

She introduced several members of the steering committee who attended the announcement.

Other dignitaries included MPP John Fraser, parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care Eric Hoskins, Brant MPP Dave Levac, Six Nations Chief Ava Hill and Brantford Mayor Chris Friel.

“It’s going to provide more care for our seniors, which we like to call our elders. They’re a very important part of our community. They have a lot of tradition and knowledge, they have our oral history and we like to spend time with them and look after them the best that we can,” Hill said.

Friel said better communication offered through Health Link dovetails with the city’s Healthy Brantford initiative, which aims to improve the health of Brantford’s citizens.

“This a nice little launch for us as we start a new mandate for council,” he said.

Other agencies and organization involved include Alzheimer Society, Brantford Emergency Medical Services, Brantford Family Health Organization, Brant County branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Community Care Access Centre, Grand River Community Health Centre, Participation House Brantford, Primacare Community Family Health Team, Six Nations Health Services and Stedman Community Hospice.

Also included are patient and family advisers, a pharmacist and other primary care providers.