Brant mayoral candidates sound off on proposed gravel pit

News Sep 28, 2014 by Natalie Paddon Brant News

Brant mayoral candidates say they plan to continue supporting the Concerned Citizens of Brant and the concerns the group has about a planned gravel pit in Paris if elected on Oct. 27.

Over the past few years, CCOB has been active in voicing their fears that the proposed Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road could contaminate the local water supply and create the need for additional road maintenance because of damage caused by gravel trucks transporting material.

The group hosted a meet-and-greet for all of the mayoral and councillor candidates in the county at Syl Apps Community Centre in Paris on Sunday to offer voters a chance to ask politicians the questions that are important to them whether they pertain to the pit or not.

“We believe it's more important that the community is informed about (the election),” said CCOB president Ron Norris.

Previously CCOB posed six questions to the local candidates and filmed responses that they posted on their website for both the provincial election in June and the 2010 municipal election.

At Sunday's event, mayoral candidate Shawn Pratt said CCOB's concerns about the planned pit would be “strongly considered” if he was elected.

The Paris resident said a common ground must be reached to allow Dufferin to continue with their business while ensuring the safety of the local water supply. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources granted Dufferin a license for this pit in 1974.

Pratt said that could be achieved through assurances from Dufferin that if and when problems occurred, they would be held legally and financially responsible for cleaning up the mess.

“I don't believe we can stop it,” said Pratt, who owns Grand River Cab. “I think we can probably work to an agreement that's beneficial to the county and to the people who own (the pit).”

Former County of Brant councillor and current mayoral candidate Roy Haggart said the municipality is limited as to what action it can take because the industry is regulated by the province.

But he said, if elected, he will continue the efforts with both council and citizens to petition the province to ensure the aquifer is not disturbed.

“Once it's contaminated, you're done,” Haggart said.

A provincial appointed member of the Lake Erie region source water protection committee for the past six years, Haggart said he made a motion a couple of years ago to send a letter to the Ministry of the Environment to request that excavation below the water table and breaking through the aquifer be designated a risk and a threat to source water protection.

Haggart said said the minister responded that it was not a risk or a threat and that this request was beyond the committee's mandate.

If elected, he said he would work toward asked neighbouring municipalities such as Brantford, Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo to support the county by approaching the minister to generate more of an impact around this issue.

Incumbent Ron Eddy said the municipality cannot stop gravel extraction because it's controlled by the province, but he has run into conflict with the provincial government including the Ministry of Natural Resources because of his concerns about excavation below the water table.

While Paris has always had gravel pits, he has worries about some pits in the area not being rehabilitated.

“There's scars on the face of the earth,” he said.

Eddy's two main concerns include how the pit could affect Paris' water supply as well as farmland because of excavating below the water table and breaking through the aquifer.

“We've got hundreds and hundreds of good farmlands that will be turned into lakes,” he said.

Eddy said he's hoping to join a new aggregates committee formed through the Association of Municipalities Ontario that will work with the provinces on issues like this one.

CCOB's Nick Greenacre said the group is asking candidates to support their action about the pit and for pit's license to be revoked.

Brant mayoral candidates sound off on proposed gravel pit

News Sep 28, 2014 by Natalie Paddon Brant News

Brant mayoral candidates say they plan to continue supporting the Concerned Citizens of Brant and the concerns the group has about a planned gravel pit in Paris if elected on Oct. 27.

Over the past few years, CCOB has been active in voicing their fears that the proposed Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road could contaminate the local water supply and create the need for additional road maintenance because of damage caused by gravel trucks transporting material.

The group hosted a meet-and-greet for all of the mayoral and councillor candidates in the county at Syl Apps Community Centre in Paris on Sunday to offer voters a chance to ask politicians the questions that are important to them whether they pertain to the pit or not.

“We believe it's more important that the community is informed about (the election),” said CCOB president Ron Norris.

Previously CCOB posed six questions to the local candidates and filmed responses that they posted on their website for both the provincial election in June and the 2010 municipal election.

At Sunday's event, mayoral candidate Shawn Pratt said CCOB's concerns about the planned pit would be “strongly considered” if he was elected.

The Paris resident said a common ground must be reached to allow Dufferin to continue with their business while ensuring the safety of the local water supply. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources granted Dufferin a license for this pit in 1974.

Pratt said that could be achieved through assurances from Dufferin that if and when problems occurred, they would be held legally and financially responsible for cleaning up the mess.

“I don't believe we can stop it,” said Pratt, who owns Grand River Cab. “I think we can probably work to an agreement that's beneficial to the county and to the people who own (the pit).”

Former County of Brant councillor and current mayoral candidate Roy Haggart said the municipality is limited as to what action it can take because the industry is regulated by the province.

But he said, if elected, he will continue the efforts with both council and citizens to petition the province to ensure the aquifer is not disturbed.

“Once it's contaminated, you're done,” Haggart said.

A provincial appointed member of the Lake Erie region source water protection committee for the past six years, Haggart said he made a motion a couple of years ago to send a letter to the Ministry of the Environment to request that excavation below the water table and breaking through the aquifer be designated a risk and a threat to source water protection.

Haggart said said the minister responded that it was not a risk or a threat and that this request was beyond the committee's mandate.

If elected, he said he would work toward asked neighbouring municipalities such as Brantford, Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo to support the county by approaching the minister to generate more of an impact around this issue.

Incumbent Ron Eddy said the municipality cannot stop gravel extraction because it's controlled by the province, but he has run into conflict with the provincial government including the Ministry of Natural Resources because of his concerns about excavation below the water table.

While Paris has always had gravel pits, he has worries about some pits in the area not being rehabilitated.

“There's scars on the face of the earth,” he said.

Eddy's two main concerns include how the pit could affect Paris' water supply as well as farmland because of excavating below the water table and breaking through the aquifer.

“We've got hundreds and hundreds of good farmlands that will be turned into lakes,” he said.

Eddy said he's hoping to join a new aggregates committee formed through the Association of Municipalities Ontario that will work with the provinces on issues like this one.

CCOB's Nick Greenacre said the group is asking candidates to support their action about the pit and for pit's license to be revoked.

Brant mayoral candidates sound off on proposed gravel pit

News Sep 28, 2014 by Natalie Paddon Brant News

Brant mayoral candidates say they plan to continue supporting the Concerned Citizens of Brant and the concerns the group has about a planned gravel pit in Paris if elected on Oct. 27.

Over the past few years, CCOB has been active in voicing their fears that the proposed Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road could contaminate the local water supply and create the need for additional road maintenance because of damage caused by gravel trucks transporting material.

The group hosted a meet-and-greet for all of the mayoral and councillor candidates in the county at Syl Apps Community Centre in Paris on Sunday to offer voters a chance to ask politicians the questions that are important to them whether they pertain to the pit or not.

“We believe it's more important that the community is informed about (the election),” said CCOB president Ron Norris.

Previously CCOB posed six questions to the local candidates and filmed responses that they posted on their website for both the provincial election in June and the 2010 municipal election.

At Sunday's event, mayoral candidate Shawn Pratt said CCOB's concerns about the planned pit would be “strongly considered” if he was elected.

The Paris resident said a common ground must be reached to allow Dufferin to continue with their business while ensuring the safety of the local water supply. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources granted Dufferin a license for this pit in 1974.

Pratt said that could be achieved through assurances from Dufferin that if and when problems occurred, they would be held legally and financially responsible for cleaning up the mess.

“I don't believe we can stop it,” said Pratt, who owns Grand River Cab. “I think we can probably work to an agreement that's beneficial to the county and to the people who own (the pit).”

Former County of Brant councillor and current mayoral candidate Roy Haggart said the municipality is limited as to what action it can take because the industry is regulated by the province.

But he said, if elected, he will continue the efforts with both council and citizens to petition the province to ensure the aquifer is not disturbed.

“Once it's contaminated, you're done,” Haggart said.

A provincial appointed member of the Lake Erie region source water protection committee for the past six years, Haggart said he made a motion a couple of years ago to send a letter to the Ministry of the Environment to request that excavation below the water table and breaking through the aquifer be designated a risk and a threat to source water protection.

Haggart said said the minister responded that it was not a risk or a threat and that this request was beyond the committee's mandate.

If elected, he said he would work toward asked neighbouring municipalities such as Brantford, Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo to support the county by approaching the minister to generate more of an impact around this issue.

Incumbent Ron Eddy said the municipality cannot stop gravel extraction because it's controlled by the province, but he has run into conflict with the provincial government including the Ministry of Natural Resources because of his concerns about excavation below the water table.

While Paris has always had gravel pits, he has worries about some pits in the area not being rehabilitated.

“There's scars on the face of the earth,” he said.

Eddy's two main concerns include how the pit could affect Paris' water supply as well as farmland because of excavating below the water table and breaking through the aquifer.

“We've got hundreds and hundreds of good farmlands that will be turned into lakes,” he said.

Eddy said he's hoping to join a new aggregates committee formed through the Association of Municipalities Ontario that will work with the provinces on issues like this one.

CCOB's Nick Greenacre said the group is asking candidates to support their action about the pit and for pit's license to be revoked.