Concerned citizens seek to deny Paris pit approvals

News Jun 04, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant wants provincial approvals for the Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road denied until there is scientific proof the gravel pit will not adversely affect the local water supply and aquifer.

County of Brant council supported the request at its most recent meeting, agreeing to ask the Ministry of Environment and Ministry of Natural Resources to hold back approvals.

“It’s clearly a victory for us, a big victory, especially in light of the fact that the MOE is currently reviewing the permit to take water,” said Ron Norris, CCOB president.

The grassroots group is worried about atrazine and other agricultural chemicals sprayed on the proposed pit site, located on 260 hectares (640 acres) of farmland along Watts Pond Road, east of Pinehurst Road. Atrazine is a common weed killer applied to cornfields.

Norris presented evidence from studies that show that atrazine can persist in soil for 20 years and doesn’t permanently bond to the soil. Stripping away the topsoil on the aggregate site would create a double whammy of removing the natural filtration provided by the soil while at the same time potentially remobilizing the atrazine. Water washing also has the potential to extract atrazine derivatives.

“As long as we leave the site the way it is nature will take its course,” Norris said. “Now that we’re stripping the soil we’re changing the dynamics of the process.”

Digging below the water table increases the vulnerability of the aquifer to runoff.

Coun. Brian Coleman disputed information presented by Norris.

“I guess I should be dead because I’ve used atrazine for 45 years,” Coleman said.

Norris said CCOB does not have a problem with farmers’ “responsible” use of atrazine.

“What we’re talking about is washing 30 million or 40 million tonnes of gravel in one little location, which is called a wash pond,” he said.

Atrazine was banned by the European Union in 2004 but continues to be used in North America.

Concerned citizens seek to deny Paris pit approvals

News Jun 04, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant wants provincial approvals for the Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road denied until there is scientific proof the gravel pit will not adversely affect the local water supply and aquifer.

County of Brant council supported the request at its most recent meeting, agreeing to ask the Ministry of Environment and Ministry of Natural Resources to hold back approvals.

“It’s clearly a victory for us, a big victory, especially in light of the fact that the MOE is currently reviewing the permit to take water,” said Ron Norris, CCOB president.

The grassroots group is worried about atrazine and other agricultural chemicals sprayed on the proposed pit site, located on 260 hectares (640 acres) of farmland along Watts Pond Road, east of Pinehurst Road. Atrazine is a common weed killer applied to cornfields.

Norris presented evidence from studies that show that atrazine can persist in soil for 20 years and doesn’t permanently bond to the soil. Stripping away the topsoil on the aggregate site would create a double whammy of removing the natural filtration provided by the soil while at the same time potentially remobilizing the atrazine. Water washing also has the potential to extract atrazine derivatives.

“As long as we leave the site the way it is nature will take its course,” Norris said. “Now that we’re stripping the soil we’re changing the dynamics of the process.”

Digging below the water table increases the vulnerability of the aquifer to runoff.

Coun. Brian Coleman disputed information presented by Norris.

“I guess I should be dead because I’ve used atrazine for 45 years,” Coleman said.

Norris said CCOB does not have a problem with farmers’ “responsible” use of atrazine.

“What we’re talking about is washing 30 million or 40 million tonnes of gravel in one little location, which is called a wash pond,” he said.

Atrazine was banned by the European Union in 2004 but continues to be used in North America.

Concerned citizens seek to deny Paris pit approvals

News Jun 04, 2014 by Brian Shypula Brant News

The Concerned Citizens of Brant wants provincial approvals for the Dufferin Aggregates pit on Watts Pond Road denied until there is scientific proof the gravel pit will not adversely affect the local water supply and aquifer.

County of Brant council supported the request at its most recent meeting, agreeing to ask the Ministry of Environment and Ministry of Natural Resources to hold back approvals.

“It’s clearly a victory for us, a big victory, especially in light of the fact that the MOE is currently reviewing the permit to take water,” said Ron Norris, CCOB president.

The grassroots group is worried about atrazine and other agricultural chemicals sprayed on the proposed pit site, located on 260 hectares (640 acres) of farmland along Watts Pond Road, east of Pinehurst Road. Atrazine is a common weed killer applied to cornfields.

Norris presented evidence from studies that show that atrazine can persist in soil for 20 years and doesn’t permanently bond to the soil. Stripping away the topsoil on the aggregate site would create a double whammy of removing the natural filtration provided by the soil while at the same time potentially remobilizing the atrazine. Water washing also has the potential to extract atrazine derivatives.

“As long as we leave the site the way it is nature will take its course,” Norris said. “Now that we’re stripping the soil we’re changing the dynamics of the process.”

Digging below the water table increases the vulnerability of the aquifer to runoff.

Coun. Brian Coleman disputed information presented by Norris.

“I guess I should be dead because I’ve used atrazine for 45 years,” Coleman said.

Norris said CCOB does not have a problem with farmers’ “responsible” use of atrazine.

“What we’re talking about is washing 30 million or 40 million tonnes of gravel in one little location, which is called a wash pond,” he said.

Atrazine was banned by the European Union in 2004 but continues to be used in North America.