How music therapy helps in the grieving process

News Feb 07, 2014 by Stedman Community Hospice Brant News

When a loved one dies, the grief we experience can be deep and profound.

We often grieve in ways that words cannot describe.

What do we do with that grief? How do we express it? How do we find our way through it?

In music, we discover a way to express grief creatively, touching upon the depth of our response to loss. The benefits of music therapy as part of the multi-disciplinary approach in hospice palliative care have been recognized and increasingly documented in health care literature.

Music therapy can also extend to provide support for bereaved caregivers and loved ones. In bereavement, we can use music to identify, acknowledge and express our grief. We can also learn how to use music as a tool for continued coping throughout the grieving process.

The music therapy bereavement group is an eight-week, topic-based, music-centred therapy group. This program was initially developed by Sara Klinck and Maureen Russell in 2008 and further revised by Klinck in 2013.

Klinck is an accredited music therapist whose clinical focus is hospice palliative care and bereavement support. Russell has been working in hospice palliative care for the past 14 years, providing psychosocial, spiritual and bereavement care to individuals and their families.

The intent of the program is to provide the bereaved with opportunities to share their stories and to find meaning and healing in a supportive environment while using the emotional and creative qualities of music.

Here is what some of the program participants have had to say about their experience with the music therapy bereavement group:

• “Under the influence of musical direction and reflections, spiritual guidance and support of group members, I was able to travel the journey of healing of the heart and soul. It has been a rewarding journey – one filled with sadness, joy and restored faith. We were linked together by the journey of grief...an experience of understanding.”

• “I know how necessary self-care is to anyone in the helping professions and I have allowed myself to receive care and healing…the use and the benefits of music therapy were new to me. This was a learning experience for me to see how music could take me to another deep and rich level of emotion.”

• “The mutual sharing and learning about each other’s journey, when you’re with people in the same boat, you’re not the only one and the music supports that. At the end, there was a real bond formed and a mutual strengthening all around the circle.”

Each of the eight weeks focuses on a central issue related to grief, which is then explored verbally and musically.

In sessions, group members are given opportunities to engage in a variety of music-listening and music-making experiences, such as clinical improvisation, lyric analysis, songwriting, group singing, music and art and the sharing of personally significant songs.

Individuals are able to experience emotional expression and validation within the music therapy group as they journey toward healing together, each connecting with the music, with their own process and with others who understand grief.

For more information about the program or to register, call Stedman Community Hospice at 519-751-7096 ext. 2500.

How music therapy helps in the grieving process

Stedman Community Hospice offers music therapy bereavement group

News Feb 07, 2014 by Stedman Community Hospice Brant News

When a loved one dies, the grief we experience can be deep and profound.

We often grieve in ways that words cannot describe.

What do we do with that grief? How do we express it? How do we find our way through it?

In music, we discover a way to express grief creatively, touching upon the depth of our response to loss. The benefits of music therapy as part of the multi-disciplinary approach in hospice palliative care have been recognized and increasingly documented in health care literature.

Music therapy can also extend to provide support for bereaved caregivers and loved ones. In bereavement, we can use music to identify, acknowledge and express our grief. We can also learn how to use music as a tool for continued coping throughout the grieving process.

The music therapy bereavement group is an eight-week, topic-based, music-centred therapy group. This program was initially developed by Sara Klinck and Maureen Russell in 2008 and further revised by Klinck in 2013.

Klinck is an accredited music therapist whose clinical focus is hospice palliative care and bereavement support. Russell has been working in hospice palliative care for the past 14 years, providing psychosocial, spiritual and bereavement care to individuals and their families.

The intent of the program is to provide the bereaved with opportunities to share their stories and to find meaning and healing in a supportive environment while using the emotional and creative qualities of music.

Here is what some of the program participants have had to say about their experience with the music therapy bereavement group:

• “Under the influence of musical direction and reflections, spiritual guidance and support of group members, I was able to travel the journey of healing of the heart and soul. It has been a rewarding journey – one filled with sadness, joy and restored faith. We were linked together by the journey of grief...an experience of understanding.”

• “I know how necessary self-care is to anyone in the helping professions and I have allowed myself to receive care and healing…the use and the benefits of music therapy were new to me. This was a learning experience for me to see how music could take me to another deep and rich level of emotion.”

• “The mutual sharing and learning about each other’s journey, when you’re with people in the same boat, you’re not the only one and the music supports that. At the end, there was a real bond formed and a mutual strengthening all around the circle.”

Each of the eight weeks focuses on a central issue related to grief, which is then explored verbally and musically.

In sessions, group members are given opportunities to engage in a variety of music-listening and music-making experiences, such as clinical improvisation, lyric analysis, songwriting, group singing, music and art and the sharing of personally significant songs.

Individuals are able to experience emotional expression and validation within the music therapy group as they journey toward healing together, each connecting with the music, with their own process and with others who understand grief.

For more information about the program or to register, call Stedman Community Hospice at 519-751-7096 ext. 2500.

How music therapy helps in the grieving process

Stedman Community Hospice offers music therapy bereavement group

News Feb 07, 2014 by Stedman Community Hospice Brant News

When a loved one dies, the grief we experience can be deep and profound.

We often grieve in ways that words cannot describe.

What do we do with that grief? How do we express it? How do we find our way through it?

In music, we discover a way to express grief creatively, touching upon the depth of our response to loss. The benefits of music therapy as part of the multi-disciplinary approach in hospice palliative care have been recognized and increasingly documented in health care literature.

Music therapy can also extend to provide support for bereaved caregivers and loved ones. In bereavement, we can use music to identify, acknowledge and express our grief. We can also learn how to use music as a tool for continued coping throughout the grieving process.

The music therapy bereavement group is an eight-week, topic-based, music-centred therapy group. This program was initially developed by Sara Klinck and Maureen Russell in 2008 and further revised by Klinck in 2013.

Klinck is an accredited music therapist whose clinical focus is hospice palliative care and bereavement support. Russell has been working in hospice palliative care for the past 14 years, providing psychosocial, spiritual and bereavement care to individuals and their families.

The intent of the program is to provide the bereaved with opportunities to share their stories and to find meaning and healing in a supportive environment while using the emotional and creative qualities of music.

Here is what some of the program participants have had to say about their experience with the music therapy bereavement group:

• “Under the influence of musical direction and reflections, spiritual guidance and support of group members, I was able to travel the journey of healing of the heart and soul. It has been a rewarding journey – one filled with sadness, joy and restored faith. We were linked together by the journey of grief...an experience of understanding.”

• “I know how necessary self-care is to anyone in the helping professions and I have allowed myself to receive care and healing…the use and the benefits of music therapy were new to me. This was a learning experience for me to see how music could take me to another deep and rich level of emotion.”

• “The mutual sharing and learning about each other’s journey, when you’re with people in the same boat, you’re not the only one and the music supports that. At the end, there was a real bond formed and a mutual strengthening all around the circle.”

Each of the eight weeks focuses on a central issue related to grief, which is then explored verbally and musically.

In sessions, group members are given opportunities to engage in a variety of music-listening and music-making experiences, such as clinical improvisation, lyric analysis, songwriting, group singing, music and art and the sharing of personally significant songs.

Individuals are able to experience emotional expression and validation within the music therapy group as they journey toward healing together, each connecting with the music, with their own process and with others who understand grief.

For more information about the program or to register, call Stedman Community Hospice at 519-751-7096 ext. 2500.