Continuing a fight for her life

News Jul 06, 2013 by John Zronik Brant News

Lauren Baron BRANT NEWS Patty Colig has been fighting for her life for 24 years. First diagnosed with cervical cancer in April 1989 while living in Burnaby, British Columbia, the Brantford resident has had almost a quarter century of radiation treatments, doctors appointments, relapses and constant pain. Through it all, her son, Wayne, 35, has been by her side, helping to care for her and supporting her through her struggle. “When she started her first round of radiation treatments, I went to every single one of them with her,” Wayne said. “I would leave school at 3 p.m. and get home at 3:30 p.m. and get in the car with a volunteer driver who would take us from Burnaby to Vancouver and we would do that every day.” Following a divorce from her husband, Patty returned to her hometown of Brantford with Wayne in 1992. Her son Sean still lives in British Columbia. By 1993, the cancer had returned. In 1995, she had a radical hysterectomy. In total, she faced 47 bouts of radiation over the years. Things stayed steady between 1995 and 2004, with regular appointments at the Juravinski Cancer Centre in Hamilton. “She had nine years of okay health,” Wayne said. “But in 2004 the radiation damage started to present itself. I remember the doctor bringing my mom into the office and saying the radiation damage had started to eat away at her insides. It was extensive.” In February, while getting a second opinion at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, doctors found another tumour in her pelvic region. “It’s been long and painful and arduous and it’s a struggle every day,” Wayne said. Despite the pain, after every diagnosis Patty bounces back, fighting with every ounce of strength she has left to stay alive. “My boys and my sister (Diane) keep me fighting,” Patty said. “Wayne, Sean and my sister are the only ones that keep me fighting. “I don’t know what I would do without (Wayne). He is my rock. A lot of people say that, but I mean it. He’s my rock.” Wayne dedicates his life to caring for his mother 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He does everything from administering her medications and cleaning the house to doing the laundry and carrying her up to bed, since the pain has moved to her sciatic nerve. He recently lost his job because he could no longer balance work and caring for his mother. “I would give up the universe if it meant that she would be well,” Wayne said. “I would give up everything if she could just be okay. “There are times when we both don’t know how to cope and we both fall into a state of extreme sadness and panic, but we seem to get through it.” To help cope, Wayne has started an Indiegogo campaign to raise money to cover the cost of car repairs so he can take his mother to appointments in Toronto and Hamilton, help pay her medical debts and, when the time comes, pay for a proper funeral. The campaign has a goal of raising $26,500, but has so far raised only $682. An additional $1,600 was raised during a recent fundraiser at Charlie’s in West Brant. “There have been a few times in the past where I’ve lost hope in the human race, but when you see people pull together like that in such a short period of time and do what they did, it’s unbelievable,” Wayne said of the money raised. Whether or not they meet the goal, Wayne still wants people to hear his mother’s story. “It’s affected our lives for 24 years, I couldn’t care less about money," he said. "We’ve struggled, but we made the very best of our situation. “I want people to know about her and see how strong she’s been. What a trooper. Twenty-four years of suffering is unbelievable and I think people should know about her.” Visit www.indiegogo.com/projects/please-help-me-help-my-mum or email pcolig@rogers.com for more information.

Continuing a fight for her life

News Jul 06, 2013 by John Zronik Brant News

Lauren Baron BRANT NEWS Patty Colig has been fighting for her life for 24 years. First diagnosed with cervical cancer in April 1989 while living in Burnaby, British Columbia, the Brantford resident has had almost a quarter century of radiation treatments, doctors appointments, relapses and constant pain. Through it all, her son, Wayne, 35, has been by her side, helping to care for her and supporting her through her struggle. “When she started her first round of radiation treatments, I went to every single one of them with her,” Wayne said. “I would leave school at 3 p.m. and get home at 3:30 p.m. and get in the car with a volunteer driver who would take us from Burnaby to Vancouver and we would do that every day.” Following a divorce from her husband, Patty returned to her hometown of Brantford with Wayne in 1992. Her son Sean still lives in British Columbia. By 1993, the cancer had returned. In 1995, she had a radical hysterectomy. In total, she faced 47 bouts of radiation over the years. Things stayed steady between 1995 and 2004, with regular appointments at the Juravinski Cancer Centre in Hamilton. “She had nine years of okay health,” Wayne said. “But in 2004 the radiation damage started to present itself. I remember the doctor bringing my mom into the office and saying the radiation damage had started to eat away at her insides. It was extensive.” In February, while getting a second opinion at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, doctors found another tumour in her pelvic region. “It’s been long and painful and arduous and it’s a struggle every day,” Wayne said. Despite the pain, after every diagnosis Patty bounces back, fighting with every ounce of strength she has left to stay alive. “My boys and my sister (Diane) keep me fighting,” Patty said. “Wayne, Sean and my sister are the only ones that keep me fighting. “I don’t know what I would do without (Wayne). He is my rock. A lot of people say that, but I mean it. He’s my rock.” Wayne dedicates his life to caring for his mother 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He does everything from administering her medications and cleaning the house to doing the laundry and carrying her up to bed, since the pain has moved to her sciatic nerve. He recently lost his job because he could no longer balance work and caring for his mother. “I would give up the universe if it meant that she would be well,” Wayne said. “I would give up everything if she could just be okay. “There are times when we both don’t know how to cope and we both fall into a state of extreme sadness and panic, but we seem to get through it.” To help cope, Wayne has started an Indiegogo campaign to raise money to cover the cost of car repairs so he can take his mother to appointments in Toronto and Hamilton, help pay her medical debts and, when the time comes, pay for a proper funeral. The campaign has a goal of raising $26,500, but has so far raised only $682. An additional $1,600 was raised during a recent fundraiser at Charlie’s in West Brant. “There have been a few times in the past where I’ve lost hope in the human race, but when you see people pull together like that in such a short period of time and do what they did, it’s unbelievable,” Wayne said of the money raised. Whether or not they meet the goal, Wayne still wants people to hear his mother’s story. “It’s affected our lives for 24 years, I couldn’t care less about money," he said. "We’ve struggled, but we made the very best of our situation. “I want people to know about her and see how strong she’s been. What a trooper. Twenty-four years of suffering is unbelievable and I think people should know about her.” Visit www.indiegogo.com/projects/please-help-me-help-my-mum or email pcolig@rogers.com for more information.

Continuing a fight for her life

News Jul 06, 2013 by John Zronik Brant News

Lauren Baron BRANT NEWS Patty Colig has been fighting for her life for 24 years. First diagnosed with cervical cancer in April 1989 while living in Burnaby, British Columbia, the Brantford resident has had almost a quarter century of radiation treatments, doctors appointments, relapses and constant pain. Through it all, her son, Wayne, 35, has been by her side, helping to care for her and supporting her through her struggle. “When she started her first round of radiation treatments, I went to every single one of them with her,” Wayne said. “I would leave school at 3 p.m. and get home at 3:30 p.m. and get in the car with a volunteer driver who would take us from Burnaby to Vancouver and we would do that every day.” Following a divorce from her husband, Patty returned to her hometown of Brantford with Wayne in 1992. Her son Sean still lives in British Columbia. By 1993, the cancer had returned. In 1995, she had a radical hysterectomy. In total, she faced 47 bouts of radiation over the years. Things stayed steady between 1995 and 2004, with regular appointments at the Juravinski Cancer Centre in Hamilton. “She had nine years of okay health,” Wayne said. “But in 2004 the radiation damage started to present itself. I remember the doctor bringing my mom into the office and saying the radiation damage had started to eat away at her insides. It was extensive.” In February, while getting a second opinion at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, doctors found another tumour in her pelvic region. “It’s been long and painful and arduous and it’s a struggle every day,” Wayne said. Despite the pain, after every diagnosis Patty bounces back, fighting with every ounce of strength she has left to stay alive. “My boys and my sister (Diane) keep me fighting,” Patty said. “Wayne, Sean and my sister are the only ones that keep me fighting. “I don’t know what I would do without (Wayne). He is my rock. A lot of people say that, but I mean it. He’s my rock.” Wayne dedicates his life to caring for his mother 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He does everything from administering her medications and cleaning the house to doing the laundry and carrying her up to bed, since the pain has moved to her sciatic nerve. He recently lost his job because he could no longer balance work and caring for his mother. “I would give up the universe if it meant that she would be well,” Wayne said. “I would give up everything if she could just be okay. “There are times when we both don’t know how to cope and we both fall into a state of extreme sadness and panic, but we seem to get through it.” To help cope, Wayne has started an Indiegogo campaign to raise money to cover the cost of car repairs so he can take his mother to appointments in Toronto and Hamilton, help pay her medical debts and, when the time comes, pay for a proper funeral. The campaign has a goal of raising $26,500, but has so far raised only $682. An additional $1,600 was raised during a recent fundraiser at Charlie’s in West Brant. “There have been a few times in the past where I’ve lost hope in the human race, but when you see people pull together like that in such a short period of time and do what they did, it’s unbelievable,” Wayne said of the money raised. Whether or not they meet the goal, Wayne still wants people to hear his mother’s story. “It’s affected our lives for 24 years, I couldn’t care less about money," he said. "We’ve struggled, but we made the very best of our situation. “I want people to know about her and see how strong she’s been. What a trooper. Twenty-four years of suffering is unbelievable and I think people should know about her.” Visit www.indiegogo.com/projects/please-help-me-help-my-mum or email pcolig@rogers.com for more information.