Cultural displays a feast for the senses

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

Senior students proudly displayed Assumption College’s cultural diversity on Monday afternoon.

“This event started with a challenge to my Grade 12s to do a social change project,” social sciences teacher Manuela Torto, said. “They said that they wanted to see social change in their school in the way of honouring their culture.”

The student-driven initiative resulted in the formation of about 30 different displays showcasing varied cultures and religions that make up students' backgrounds.

“Their mid-term is based on this so now they have to go out and collect data and do a report on it,” Torto said. “This is what they wanted to do, to show off who they are.”

About 13 different countries were represented by Assumption’s sociology class at the inaugural Amplify Your Culture event.

“We also got our world religions classes involved by putting together some booths of different religious festivals around the world,” Torto said. “There’s another 12 or 15 of those.”

Students, faculty and staff were invited to the cafeteria to take part in the event that included food and demonstrations.

Dinah Muhamadnor brought her mother Rahidah Ramli and father Muhamadnor to Assumption to help man her display representing the Malay culture. Her display offered tastes of cultural foods and information about Malaysia and Singapore.

“I think I’m the only Malay student in this school so I really wanted to showcase my culture. I’m very proud of it; it’s a beautiful culture,” Dinah said. “This is who I am … I want people to see this side of my life that they don’t always see.”

Dinah and her family moved to Canada from Singapore to pursue educational and job opportunities. Good health care was another reason they chose Canada.

“That’s not to say our country did not have that,” Ramli, said. “But we think that they are open to a more diverse culture here.”

Malory Villa and Tyler Azzarello were manning a display representing the Philippines where her paternal grandmother originated from.

“My family lived in Hawaii, they moved to Hawaii first and then they came to Canada,” Villa said.

Her display taught people about “the history and the traditions, dances, clothes; a lot of stuff that originates from the Philippines.”

Villa baked coconut macaroon cakes to give people a taste of the sweeter side of the Philippine culture.

“My dad gave me the recipe because his mom used to make them all the time,” she said.

Villa wanted to showcase her heritage to help build more community in the school.

“We celebrate a lot of things like Black History Month and the Native American culture in school but we don’t really do a lot of other backgrounds,” she said. “When you say I’m Asian they just think Chinese. No one really goes into depth or don’t really care where you originate from.

“We did this so other people feel it’s OK, you aren’t alone. You have so many other people in this community that have so many other nationalities; it’s not just you.”

Azzarello, who has an Italian background, said the event brought the entire school together for the afternoon.

“We got to represent each others’ countries and get to know everything about everyone,” he said. “I’ve learned a lot about my culture. I learned about all the traditional dances and the secret holidays, so it was kind of cool.”

At the same time, students also discovered many similarities between cultures.

“Every culture has the same aspects,” Azzarello said.

 

 

 


Cultural displays a feast for the senses

Assumption students host Amplify Your Culture event

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

Senior students proudly displayed Assumption College’s cultural diversity on Monday afternoon.

“This event started with a challenge to my Grade 12s to do a social change project,” social sciences teacher Manuela Torto, said. “They said that they wanted to see social change in their school in the way of honouring their culture.”

The student-driven initiative resulted in the formation of about 30 different displays showcasing varied cultures and religions that make up students' backgrounds.

“Their mid-term is based on this so now they have to go out and collect data and do a report on it,” Torto said. “This is what they wanted to do, to show off who they are.”

About 13 different countries were represented by Assumption’s sociology class at the inaugural Amplify Your Culture event.

“We also got our world religions classes involved by putting together some booths of different religious festivals around the world,” Torto said. “There’s another 12 or 15 of those.”

Students, faculty and staff were invited to the cafeteria to take part in the event that included food and demonstrations.

Dinah Muhamadnor brought her mother Rahidah Ramli and father Muhamadnor to Assumption to help man her display representing the Malay culture. Her display offered tastes of cultural foods and information about Malaysia and Singapore.

“I think I’m the only Malay student in this school so I really wanted to showcase my culture. I’m very proud of it; it’s a beautiful culture,” Dinah said. “This is who I am … I want people to see this side of my life that they don’t always see.”

Dinah and her family moved to Canada from Singapore to pursue educational and job opportunities. Good health care was another reason they chose Canada.

“That’s not to say our country did not have that,” Ramli, said. “But we think that they are open to a more diverse culture here.”

Malory Villa and Tyler Azzarello were manning a display representing the Philippines where her paternal grandmother originated from.

“My family lived in Hawaii, they moved to Hawaii first and then they came to Canada,” Villa said.

Her display taught people about “the history and the traditions, dances, clothes; a lot of stuff that originates from the Philippines.”

Villa baked coconut macaroon cakes to give people a taste of the sweeter side of the Philippine culture.

“My dad gave me the recipe because his mom used to make them all the time,” she said.

Villa wanted to showcase her heritage to help build more community in the school.

“We celebrate a lot of things like Black History Month and the Native American culture in school but we don’t really do a lot of other backgrounds,” she said. “When you say I’m Asian they just think Chinese. No one really goes into depth or don’t really care where you originate from.

“We did this so other people feel it’s OK, you aren’t alone. You have so many other people in this community that have so many other nationalities; it’s not just you.”

Azzarello, who has an Italian background, said the event brought the entire school together for the afternoon.

“We got to represent each others’ countries and get to know everything about everyone,” he said. “I’ve learned a lot about my culture. I learned about all the traditional dances and the secret holidays, so it was kind of cool.”

At the same time, students also discovered many similarities between cultures.

“Every culture has the same aspects,” Azzarello said.

 

 

 


Cultural displays a feast for the senses

Assumption students host Amplify Your Culture event

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

Senior students proudly displayed Assumption College’s cultural diversity on Monday afternoon.

“This event started with a challenge to my Grade 12s to do a social change project,” social sciences teacher Manuela Torto, said. “They said that they wanted to see social change in their school in the way of honouring their culture.”

The student-driven initiative resulted in the formation of about 30 different displays showcasing varied cultures and religions that make up students' backgrounds.

“Their mid-term is based on this so now they have to go out and collect data and do a report on it,” Torto said. “This is what they wanted to do, to show off who they are.”

About 13 different countries were represented by Assumption’s sociology class at the inaugural Amplify Your Culture event.

“We also got our world religions classes involved by putting together some booths of different religious festivals around the world,” Torto said. “There’s another 12 or 15 of those.”

Students, faculty and staff were invited to the cafeteria to take part in the event that included food and demonstrations.

Dinah Muhamadnor brought her mother Rahidah Ramli and father Muhamadnor to Assumption to help man her display representing the Malay culture. Her display offered tastes of cultural foods and information about Malaysia and Singapore.

“I think I’m the only Malay student in this school so I really wanted to showcase my culture. I’m very proud of it; it’s a beautiful culture,” Dinah said. “This is who I am … I want people to see this side of my life that they don’t always see.”

Dinah and her family moved to Canada from Singapore to pursue educational and job opportunities. Good health care was another reason they chose Canada.

“That’s not to say our country did not have that,” Ramli, said. “But we think that they are open to a more diverse culture here.”

Malory Villa and Tyler Azzarello were manning a display representing the Philippines where her paternal grandmother originated from.

“My family lived in Hawaii, they moved to Hawaii first and then they came to Canada,” Villa said.

Her display taught people about “the history and the traditions, dances, clothes; a lot of stuff that originates from the Philippines.”

Villa baked coconut macaroon cakes to give people a taste of the sweeter side of the Philippine culture.

“My dad gave me the recipe because his mom used to make them all the time,” she said.

Villa wanted to showcase her heritage to help build more community in the school.

“We celebrate a lot of things like Black History Month and the Native American culture in school but we don’t really do a lot of other backgrounds,” she said. “When you say I’m Asian they just think Chinese. No one really goes into depth or don’t really care where you originate from.

“We did this so other people feel it’s OK, you aren’t alone. You have so many other people in this community that have so many other nationalities; it’s not just you.”

Azzarello, who has an Italian background, said the event brought the entire school together for the afternoon.

“We got to represent each others’ countries and get to know everything about everyone,” he said. “I’ve learned a lot about my culture. I learned about all the traditional dances and the secret holidays, so it was kind of cool.”

At the same time, students also discovered many similarities between cultures.

“Every culture has the same aspects,” Azzarello said.