St. John’s students come up with solid business plan

Community Oct 25, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

An enterprising idea turned into a $1,000 award for students of Marty Quinlan’s Construction Engineering, Custom Woodworking and Technology class at St. John’s College.

After devising a business plan and estimate, six senior and co-op students submitted their idea to the Mechanical, Industrial, Technology and Construction (MITC) contest that is open to Ontario high schools.

Contest information was provided to them by the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board’s Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP.)

The OYAP co-ordinator “knew that this was an extension of what we were already doing in the program and that we would be an ideal group to be in this competition,” Quinlan said. “Because we’ve been making Muskoka chairs for years and selling them to the community for years now, he thought this contest really fit us perfectly.”

St. John’s is also creating a video to help promote the MITC contest to other schools.

By winning the money, the students were able to purchase wood and tools required to construct cedar Muskoka chairs that are now being sold in order to purchase necessities such as sandpaper, blade sharpening and wood so the class can continue learning about the trades.

Students running the enterprise are not allowed to make a profit but are allowed to cover the cost of overhead and to negotiate prices, which saw local businesses offer discounts on required materials.

“With everything going on in the world like the hurricanes and fires and difficulty trading with other countries, the price of cedar goes up almost everyday,” said Deanne Durant, head of marketing for the project.

“We’re at a point where we can almost not afford (to buy enough cedar.) It’s not just one class that’s getting it, it’s four, so there’s a shortage of wood for sure.”

Project general manager Nathan DeGoey said cedar is an ideal wood to work with because of its price and durability.

“When this program first started, they figured out that a Muskoka chair was the perfect project to start with for each of the students because they could provide all the wood necessary for each student to build at least one chair,” DeGoey said. “It looks nice too.”

Students have gotten quite adept at building the solid wood chairs, added Evan Ryan.

“When it’s not too busy, you can probably get one cut out and everything put together in one class,” he said. “But with all of the classes going on, it can take up to a week. Right now, we’re in production so we’re making all of the pieces first and then we’re going to assemble them after we get all 24 chairs cut out for our first batch.”

Students will construct 24 chairs at a time with a goal to sell 100 by Dec. 1., which will ensure the chairs are ready for Christmas gift giving.

“We figured 24 chairs at a time is manageable and not too cluttered in the shop,” DeGoey said. “We want to be as efficient as possible.”

Teams of builders from each period work on the orders with the senior and co-op students taking the lead roles.

In addition to DeGoey as general manager and Durant as marketing head, Ryan, Justin Carr, Zach Edwards and Easton MacNeil lead production and finishing. Quinlan is CEO and everyone oversees quality control.

Finished chairs can be picked up and paid for at the school upon completion. Chairs cost $100 unfinished or $110 finished with Varathane. People who want a specific paint colour or stain also pay $110 and must provide the specific coating they want.

By creating the enterprise, the students are able to continue honing their skills in the trades while also learning how to run a successful business.

“I’m really impressed,” Quinlan said. “It’s teaching us all about quality control. quality products, customer service, efficiency, delivering on time, team work, what things cost, working within a budget and being part of the community.”

People can place an order by emailing DeGoey at ndegoey0301@bhncdsb.ca.

 


St. John’s students come up with solid business plan

Cedar Muskoka chairs a comfortable fit for construction class

Community Oct 25, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

An enterprising idea turned into a $1,000 award for students of Marty Quinlan’s Construction Engineering, Custom Woodworking and Technology class at St. John’s College.

After devising a business plan and estimate, six senior and co-op students submitted their idea to the Mechanical, Industrial, Technology and Construction (MITC) contest that is open to Ontario high schools.

Contest information was provided to them by the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board’s Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP.)

The OYAP co-ordinator “knew that this was an extension of what we were already doing in the program and that we would be an ideal group to be in this competition,” Quinlan said. “Because we’ve been making Muskoka chairs for years and selling them to the community for years now, he thought this contest really fit us perfectly.”

St. John’s is also creating a video to help promote the MITC contest to other schools.

By winning the money, the students were able to purchase wood and tools required to construct cedar Muskoka chairs that are now being sold in order to purchase necessities such as sandpaper, blade sharpening and wood so the class can continue learning about the trades.

Students running the enterprise are not allowed to make a profit but are allowed to cover the cost of overhead and to negotiate prices, which saw local businesses offer discounts on required materials.

“With everything going on in the world like the hurricanes and fires and difficulty trading with other countries, the price of cedar goes up almost everyday,” said Deanne Durant, head of marketing for the project.

“We’re at a point where we can almost not afford (to buy enough cedar.) It’s not just one class that’s getting it, it’s four, so there’s a shortage of wood for sure.”

Project general manager Nathan DeGoey said cedar is an ideal wood to work with because of its price and durability.

“When this program first started, they figured out that a Muskoka chair was the perfect project to start with for each of the students because they could provide all the wood necessary for each student to build at least one chair,” DeGoey said. “It looks nice too.”

Students have gotten quite adept at building the solid wood chairs, added Evan Ryan.

“When it’s not too busy, you can probably get one cut out and everything put together in one class,” he said. “But with all of the classes going on, it can take up to a week. Right now, we’re in production so we’re making all of the pieces first and then we’re going to assemble them after we get all 24 chairs cut out for our first batch.”

Students will construct 24 chairs at a time with a goal to sell 100 by Dec. 1., which will ensure the chairs are ready for Christmas gift giving.

“We figured 24 chairs at a time is manageable and not too cluttered in the shop,” DeGoey said. “We want to be as efficient as possible.”

Teams of builders from each period work on the orders with the senior and co-op students taking the lead roles.

In addition to DeGoey as general manager and Durant as marketing head, Ryan, Justin Carr, Zach Edwards and Easton MacNeil lead production and finishing. Quinlan is CEO and everyone oversees quality control.

Finished chairs can be picked up and paid for at the school upon completion. Chairs cost $100 unfinished or $110 finished with Varathane. People who want a specific paint colour or stain also pay $110 and must provide the specific coating they want.

By creating the enterprise, the students are able to continue honing their skills in the trades while also learning how to run a successful business.

“I’m really impressed,” Quinlan said. “It’s teaching us all about quality control. quality products, customer service, efficiency, delivering on time, team work, what things cost, working within a budget and being part of the community.”

People can place an order by emailing DeGoey at ndegoey0301@bhncdsb.ca.

 


St. John’s students come up with solid business plan

Cedar Muskoka chairs a comfortable fit for construction class

Community Oct 25, 2017 by Colleen Toms Brant News

An enterprising idea turned into a $1,000 award for students of Marty Quinlan’s Construction Engineering, Custom Woodworking and Technology class at St. John’s College.

After devising a business plan and estimate, six senior and co-op students submitted their idea to the Mechanical, Industrial, Technology and Construction (MITC) contest that is open to Ontario high schools.

Contest information was provided to them by the Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board’s Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP.)

The OYAP co-ordinator “knew that this was an extension of what we were already doing in the program and that we would be an ideal group to be in this competition,” Quinlan said. “Because we’ve been making Muskoka chairs for years and selling them to the community for years now, he thought this contest really fit us perfectly.”

St. John’s is also creating a video to help promote the MITC contest to other schools.

By winning the money, the students were able to purchase wood and tools required to construct cedar Muskoka chairs that are now being sold in order to purchase necessities such as sandpaper, blade sharpening and wood so the class can continue learning about the trades.

Students running the enterprise are not allowed to make a profit but are allowed to cover the cost of overhead and to negotiate prices, which saw local businesses offer discounts on required materials.

“With everything going on in the world like the hurricanes and fires and difficulty trading with other countries, the price of cedar goes up almost everyday,” said Deanne Durant, head of marketing for the project.

“We’re at a point where we can almost not afford (to buy enough cedar.) It’s not just one class that’s getting it, it’s four, so there’s a shortage of wood for sure.”

Project general manager Nathan DeGoey said cedar is an ideal wood to work with because of its price and durability.

“When this program first started, they figured out that a Muskoka chair was the perfect project to start with for each of the students because they could provide all the wood necessary for each student to build at least one chair,” DeGoey said. “It looks nice too.”

Students have gotten quite adept at building the solid wood chairs, added Evan Ryan.

“When it’s not too busy, you can probably get one cut out and everything put together in one class,” he said. “But with all of the classes going on, it can take up to a week. Right now, we’re in production so we’re making all of the pieces first and then we’re going to assemble them after we get all 24 chairs cut out for our first batch.”

Students will construct 24 chairs at a time with a goal to sell 100 by Dec. 1., which will ensure the chairs are ready for Christmas gift giving.

“We figured 24 chairs at a time is manageable and not too cluttered in the shop,” DeGoey said. “We want to be as efficient as possible.”

Teams of builders from each period work on the orders with the senior and co-op students taking the lead roles.

In addition to DeGoey as general manager and Durant as marketing head, Ryan, Justin Carr, Zach Edwards and Easton MacNeil lead production and finishing. Quinlan is CEO and everyone oversees quality control.

Finished chairs can be picked up and paid for at the school upon completion. Chairs cost $100 unfinished or $110 finished with Varathane. People who want a specific paint colour or stain also pay $110 and must provide the specific coating they want.

By creating the enterprise, the students are able to continue honing their skills in the trades while also learning how to run a successful business.

“I’m really impressed,” Quinlan said. “It’s teaching us all about quality control. quality products, customer service, efficiency, delivering on time, team work, what things cost, working within a budget and being part of the community.”

People can place an order by emailing DeGoey at ndegoey0301@bhncdsb.ca.